Author Topic: When "No Thank You" dosen't work...what next?  (Read 12084 times)

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nolechica

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Re: When "No Thank You" dosen't work...what next?
« Reply #60 on: April 13, 2014, 05:43:00 PM »
I use my local area code plus 867-5309 if asked to provide a phone number.  I've only had one cashier "get it".  Young kid, who smirked a little bit and then jokingly shouted "Jenny!  I've finally found you!"

When that song made the one-hit wonder list, 12 people actually had that number.

blarg314

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Re: When "No Thank You" dosen't work...what next?
« Reply #61 on: April 13, 2014, 08:34:59 PM »

In Canada postal codes are unique to an address. So unless you live in an apartment building, it *is* your address.

Using credit cards  with an international address in the US can be a pain for some things. In my experience, for example, you cannot use pay at the pump for gas, because the system doesn't recognize non US zip codes, and that's what's used for identification.

Mind you, if you have a US credit card without a chip (I think most don't, right?), you may be out of luck travelling when travelling abroad because you can't enter a PIN, which is the security screening for those cards.

I've had problems using international cards for buying stuff on line. A lot of sites aren't set up for international addresses, and sometimes it's physically impossible to enter my address, or I can't make it match the way it's reading the address to check the credit card payment, or it simply doesn't fit in the amount of space provided.

mmswm

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Re: When "No Thank You" dosen't work...what next?
« Reply #62 on: April 13, 2014, 09:38:41 PM »
I use my local area code plus 867-5309 if asked to provide a phone number.  I've only had one cashier "get it".  Young kid, who smirked a little bit and then jokingly shouted "Jenny!  I've finally found you!"

When that song made the one-hit wonder list, 12 people actually had that number.

As of a couple years ago, somebody in NYC still did, and refuses to give it up.  According to a high level telecommunications engineer I know, quite a number of people had the number when the song came out.  Many of those people requested their numbers to be changed, which the company my father worked for changed without a fee, and then put the number on the "do not issue" list, and let it die a natural death.  The FCC could have also fined the song writer, as there are actually laws regarding numbers that can be used in media.  That's why "555" numbers are used in TV and movies, as that's the prefix the FCC has set aside for fake numbers.

/end hijack.
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shortstuff

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Re: When "No Thank You" dosen't work...what next?
« Reply #63 on: April 13, 2014, 09:50:44 PM »
Yes, in Texas (and most other places I've traveled in the US), a zip code check is a fraud prevention check. If you don't give them the zip code that matches the credit card billing statement, the transaction is denied by the credit card company. I've had that happen numerous times when I moved (changing zip codes) and put in the old zip code without thinking.

How do they cope with international credit cards? Is there some sort of check so they only validate US credit cards?

In my area, as far as I know, only gas stations use the zip code thing as a purely-identity theft feature (here in NJ we cannot pump our own gas ;)).  And even then, not every gas station does it.  So many are locally franchise owned, there's no huge policy in effect, although it happens more often at truck stops and gas stations just off the largest highways. 

When I was in retail, the computer systems in my stores could not accept international information.  It was very frustrating for customers who wanted to be on the spam lists, or sign up for the credit cards. 

The other thing I was always  :o about was typing in the driver's license number for a check, so the bank could validate the account over the phone/internet system.  I felt so bad for foreign travelers who wanted to pay by check but couldn't!  Or the little old lady with out a license.  I understand having to have fraud prevention measures, but it's all very one size fits all from a policy standpoint, and it doesn't always work out in real life. 

AuntieA

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Re: When "No Thank You" dosen't work...what next?
« Reply #64 on: April 14, 2014, 02:43:44 AM »
A liquor store chain here has a discount club, but it's online. In order to use the coupons which one prints off, one must give the clerk their email address. Yeah, like I'm going to say any email address out loud in a liquor store. I just hand the clerk one of the personal cards I made up for myself (name, phone #, email address only). They hand the card back after verifying my membership.
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wolfie

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Re: When "No Thank You" dosen't work...what next?
« Reply #65 on: April 14, 2014, 10:01:19 AM »
I feel for those working the front lines who have to ask for such information, but I am not giving it. However, rather than making their jobs harder I simply make up the information. You want a zip code? How about 12345? It works. Or I know that Arizona begins, at least I think it does, with 845 so I just add two numbers to that even though I live in California. I also do not carry grocery store cards so I just enter the general phone number of the largest employer in my area. It works.

I began doing this a long time ago because I didn't want to make anyone's job harder or be unpleasant about refusing. And it works for me. Corporate gets zip, the cashier gets an easy transaction, and I get out of there, privacy intact.

12345 is in upstate NY. So yes that will always work and if they really are collecting to see where their customer base is then it will throw them off a bit if you are in CA. (not that that is a bad thing) ;-)

wolfie

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Re: When "No Thank You" dosen't work...what next?
« Reply #66 on: April 14, 2014, 10:04:49 AM »
I use my local area code plus 867-5309 if asked to provide a phone number.  I've only had one cashier "get it".  Young kid, who smirked a little bit and then jokingly shouted "Jenny!  I've finally found you!"

When that song made the one-hit wonder list, 12 people actually had that number.

When I went to college all the dorms came with phones and each room had the next number in sequence. Campus has 867 as the first three digits and a male dorm had 53* as it's base. They were not amused when people would call for Jenny.

Morticia

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Re: When "No Thank You" dosen't work...what next?
« Reply #67 on: April 14, 2014, 10:07:23 AM »

In Canada postal codes are unique to an address. So unless you live in an apartment building, it *is* your address.

Using credit cards  with an international address in the US can be a pain for some things. In my experience, for example, you cannot use pay at the pump for gas, because the system doesn't recognize non US zip codes, and that's what's used for identification.


I think you have been misinformed. My neighbours on both sides of my house have the same postal code I do.

I have found using 00000 works at U.S. gas pumps.
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Outdoor Girl

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Re: When "No Thank You" dosen't work...what next?
« Reply #68 on: April 14, 2014, 10:38:31 AM »

In Canada postal codes are unique to an address. So unless you live in an apartment building, it *is* your address.

This is not true - a particular area of a city or town will all have the same postal code.  Until my Dad's town got too big, the entire town had the same postal code.

I will usually give my postal code but comments here have me rethinking that.  I only give personal information to a few very specific shops because it is advantageous for me to do so.  And a few shops that require a membership in order to shop there will have my information, as well.

I usually say 'No, thank you', when asked for personal information.  I, fortunately, have never had anyone insist.  But if they did, I wouldn't be shopping at that store again.  I do the same when asked to donate $2 to whatever their cause of the day is.

The stories about having to suggest other products based on what is in someone's cart reminds me of the day I was not very eHell worthy.  I was at the cashier in the grocery store when a college aged man put one small pumpkin pie on the belt, with two cans of whipped cream.  So I opened my big mouth and said, 'You know, one can of whipped cream is more than enough for that pie.  Unless you are planning more fun for later.'  I couldn't believe those words came out of my mouth; I don't know what came over me.  The kid paused, gave me a grin, and said he was planning on more fun.  The cashier just howled.  And I got the heck out of there.
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Morty'sCleaningLady

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Re: When "No Thank You" dosen't work...what next?
« Reply #69 on: April 14, 2014, 10:52:31 AM »
I use my local area code plus 867-5309 if asked to provide a phone number.  I've only had one cashier "get it".  Young kid, who smirked a little bit and then jokingly shouted "Jenny!  I've finally found you!"

A local plumber has that number in my area code.  They run the song in their ads.  love it!
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TootsNYC

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Re: When "No Thank You" dosen't work...what next?
« Reply #70 on: April 14, 2014, 12:42:19 PM »
I guess I don't understand how it's a violation of privacy to give a zip code.   :-\

I'm honestly not trying to be snarky or start anything, I'm genuinely baffled...can one of you explain?

I surely understand it on phone numbers, email addys and home address, etc.

I love EHell!  I learn so much. :)

Apparently your zip code combined with the name from your credit card can be enough to uniquely identify you when those items are combined with consumer information databases that companies can buy.  The info then matches you with your address, purchasing history, and whatever other data they've mined from other sources.  It's downright creepy.

I also remember reading once that the fact that you gave them your ZIP Code can be used to claim that you have established a business relationship with them, and they can spam you to whatever degree they would have been otherwise prohibited from doing.

But I've also been told the "checking on where our customer base is" as the reason. I'm generally willing to give that out.

nuit93

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Re: When "No Thank You" dosen't work...what next?
« Reply #71 on: April 14, 2014, 01:22:13 PM »
Please don't blame the cashier.  Corporate people often insist on these kinds of things thinking it will help, or be useful information, or whatever, and the cashiers (or whoever deals with customers face to face) are often under threat of being fired of they don't  comply with the "script".

When I was in university I was actually fired from my job at the hardware store I was working in because I didn't meet my quota for 3 filled out store credit card applications per day.

I think you handled things very well, considering how annoying those kinds of things can be (I'm buying jeans, you don't need my postal code!) but I would also like to suggest you contact their corporate offices and inform them that you don't care for their policy of asking for your personal information at every purchase and will choose to spend your money someplace that doesn't do so.  The strongest statement you can make is to take your money elsewhere.

I was almost fired from a department store for the same reason, despite the fact that I would constantly hear complaints from customers about how we badgered them for the store card.

Please, PLEASE don't take it out on the cashier.  S/he could get in trouble even if you just refuse to go through with the transaction.  Give fake information if you have to and complain to corporate.

livluvlaf

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Re: When "No Thank You" dosen't work...what next?
« Reply #72 on: April 14, 2014, 01:47:41 PM »

In Canada postal codes are unique to an address. So unless you live in an apartment building, it *is* your address.


This is not true - a particular area of a city or town will all have the same postal code.  Until my Dad's town got too big, the entire town had the same postal code.


Definitely not true. My grandparents and my Aunt live over 15km apart, and share the same postal code. As do the rest of the farmers in their region.

I live in a densely populated city, 12 of my neighbours share my postal code. But when I lived in a 20 story building, it had a unique postal code to the rest of the neighbourhood.

livluvlaf

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Re: When "No Thank You" dosen't work...what next?
« Reply #73 on: April 14, 2014, 01:57:58 PM »
Yes, in Texas (and most other places I've traveled in the US), a zip code check is a fraud prevention check. If you don't give them the zip code that matches the credit card billing statement, the transaction is denied by the credit card company. I've had that happen numerous times when I moved (changing zip codes) and put in the old zip code without thinking.

How do they cope with international credit cards? Is there some sort of check so they only validate US credit cards?

I recently attended a conference in the US general stores with regular processing credit card terminals have no problem accepting my Canadian CC. They also asked for my Zip code, but I just told them I was visiting from out of country. It didn't hinder the trancation in the least. But many of the vendors at the conference trade show were using "portable terminals" (Square) which couldn't accept my credit card. Their software wasn't set up to process a card without the Zip confirmation.  OTOH - my Canadian bank card only works at ATM machines cannot use it at retail terminals.

dawbs

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Re: When "No Thank You" dosen't work...what next?
« Reply #74 on: April 14, 2014, 02:03:11 PM »
I guess I don't understand how it's a violation of privacy to give a zip code.   :-\

I'm honestly not trying to be snarky or start anything, I'm genuinely baffled...can one of you explain?

I surely understand it on phone numbers, email addys and home address, etc.

I love EHell!  I learn so much. :)

There are some good articles on it too:
http://www.forbes.com/sites/adamtanner/2013/06/19/theres-a-billion-reasons-not-to-give-stores-your-zip-code-ever/

http://business.time.com/2013/07/11/when-retailer-asks-can-i-have-your-zip-code-just-say-no/