Author Topic: The address in your email signature  (Read 3285 times)

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Roses

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Re: The address in your email signature
« Reply #15 on: April 17, 2014, 11:58:53 PM »
I don't use my work e-mail for personal correspondence for exactly this reason.  I think if you don't want people to have or use your work information, the safest thing to do is to not send it to them.

veronaz

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Re: The address in your email signature
« Reply #16 on: April 18, 2014, 01:20:41 PM »
I don't use my work e-mail for personal correspondence for exactly this reason.  I think if you don't want people to have or use your work information, the safest thing to do is to not send it to them.

Bingo.  Makes sense.

JoieGirl7

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Re: The address in your email signature
« Reply #17 on: April 18, 2014, 01:39:38 PM »
I don't use my work e-mail for personal correspondence for exactly this reason.  I think if you don't want people to have or use your work information, the safest thing to do is to not send it to them.

Bingo.  Makes sense.

Generally, I would agree but the people the OP was dealing with have an obligation to use the address that is on file, not any address they might find at the bottom of an email.

For example, a business owner may have the physical address of their shop at the bottom of their email forms but use a PO Box or office address for billing, taxes and other senstivie information.

The people who handle those accounts should not take it upon themselves to change the client's preferred address without being specifically directed to do so by the client.  It's not their decision to make particularly when sensitive information is involved.

veronaz

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Re: The address in your email signature
« Reply #18 on: April 18, 2014, 01:44:21 PM »
Using a work email for personal correspondence is a bad idea - for many reasons.

JoieGirl7

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Re: The address in your email signature
« Reply #19 on: April 18, 2014, 01:53:09 PM »
Using a work email for personal correspondence is a bad idea - for many reasons.

I agree, but many people do.  In some places it is hard to access a personal account due to a fire wall.  My husband uses his work email all the time if needs to send me an email during the day.  Don't think we don't think very carefully about what we say or how we say it!  :)

I still can't absolve someone from changing a client's address on the basis of an email sig.  Address changes should only be done if the client deliberately requests it.

veronaz

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Re: The address in your email signature
« Reply #20 on: April 18, 2014, 02:00:51 PM »
Quote
Address changes should only be done if the client deliberately requests it.

Should.  Yes.  I think everyone would agree with how address changes should be done.

Accountant's office made the mistake.  I said that earlier.

But OP should have called and spoken to someone to make sure the items would not be sent to her office (instead of sending yet another email which was not read in a timely manner).



« Last Edit: April 19, 2014, 10:14:15 PM by veronaz »

aussie_chick

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Re: The address in your email signature
« Reply #21 on: April 19, 2014, 07:38:12 PM »
Using a work email for personal correspondence is a bad idea - for many reasons.

I agree, but many people do.  In some places it is hard to access a personal account due to a fire wall.  My husband uses his work email all the time if needs to send me an email during the day.  Don't think we don't think very carefully about what we say or how we say it!  :)

I still can't absolve someone from changing a client's address on the basis of an email sig.  Address changes should only be done if the client deliberately requests it.

Many people do but maybe they shouldn't? If there is a firewall or something like that in place to stop you (general you) accessing a private account, then doesn't that say "you're at work and shouldn't be doing personal business on company time"?

I do agree that for any sensitive or private information, companies should only use the address specifically provided to them for such use. However, if you feel strongly about it, don't give them the option of using anything else.

DanaJ

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Re: The address in your email signature
« Reply #22 on: April 19, 2014, 08:06:50 PM »
Many people do but maybe they shouldn't? If there is a firewall or something like that in place to stop you (general you) accessing a private account, then doesn't that say "you're at work and shouldn't be doing personal business on company time"?
That is an extremely unrealistic statement. Some personal business can only be conducted during 9-5 business hours. The firewalls are not to restrict you from doing personal business from your office, they are generally set up at institutions as a security measure to protect sensitive data.

For example, my friend works in finance. All external email programs and social media platforms are blocked because they must be able to track and log communications leaving their business. It protects the company from things like allegations of insider trading and helps to mitigate other security risks, such as sending very sensitive information over unsecured networks or easily hackable systems. For example, my Yahoo email was compromised by the Heartbleed bug, I can guarantee my friend's workplace servers were not. His computer also doesn't come with any USB ports or anything that would allow portable data storage, so he could not take copies of sensitive data out of the office.

My SO can only use office email while at work. Luckily, we've never had a service provider do something silly like copy information from a signature and use that to update their records without permission. That's very unprofessional of them.

Possum

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Re: The address in your email signature
« Reply #23 on: April 19, 2014, 10:46:45 PM »
I have this problem with phone numbers.  I don't do enough phone calls to warrant getting a smart phone, so I have a pay-as-you-go.  Our household also has a shared landline, so I frequently make outgoing calls on it, and ask to be called back at my smart phone number.  But people so frequently just ignore it--or miss it--and call me back at my house.

Sometimes it's just a matter of inconvenience, sometimes it's more.  I finally figured out how to block my number on caller ID, so I'm going to be using it for the future--even though it means fewer people actually picking up the phone when I call.