A Civil World. Off-topic discussions on a variety of topics. > Time For a Coffee Break!

s/o -- Special Snowflake collective awards or punishments

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pearls n purls:
I remember classrooms could win popcorn parties for bringing in the most money for fundraisers.  I have no problem with that, but I do not like collective punishments.

I remember teachers making the whole class put their heads down on the desks for punishment if a few kids were misbehaving.  It didn't bother me too much in elementary school, but I felt it humiliating in high school.

While not quite the same thing, we had some group projects and grades.  I had the highest in the class, so I was put with the two kids with the lowest grades.  I tried to encourage the boys to help, but I wound up doing almost all of the work.  I wrote out their parts for the presentation, but when I presented my piece, they were talking and goofing off behind me.  We were docked an entire grade for their misbehavior.

The example that bothered me the most was when about 1/3 of the class were talking during the beginning of a PE class.  The teacher made us do drills that we weren't use to doing and at a much higher intensity that what we were used to.  About halfway through the class, most of us were groaning in pain and the teacher was grinning from ear to ear.  Yes, it was a sizable group of kids misbehaving, but it was the popular clique and I don't think anyone else felt comfortable shushing them when they were talking.

SCAJAfamily:
I hate collective punishments as well.  When A was in 3rd grade the teacher did this for recesses.  If there was too much talking, everyone stayed in for 50% or all of recess.  According to A, this happened over half the time, which I doubted.  Other parents agreed it happened "a lot". 

I never did say anything because it has to be really bad for me to question a teacher.  A did say it got better later in the year, so either the students shut up or the teacher wanted her recess break back.

Asharah:

--- Quote from: SCAJAfamily on April 26, 2014, 06:16:26 PM ---I hate collective punishments as well.  When A was in 3rd grade the teacher did this for recesses.  If there was too much talking, everyone stayed in for 50% or all of recess.  According to A, this happened over half the time, which I doubted.  Other parents agreed it happened "a lot". 

I never did say anything because it has to be really bad for me to question a teacher.  A did say it got better later in the year, so either the students shut up or the teacher wanted her recess break back.

--- End quote ---
Or she learned the natural consequences of not letting the kids out to run off some of that over-abundant energy.  ;D

Mikayla:
I encountered this only once in my life and I'm still not sure what I think.   It was a variation on the "honor code" used in military academies, where if you stand by knowing wrong was done, you're equally guilty.

In 8th grade, I was in an accelerated courseload, and we went through some additional testing to determine our placements in high school.  The teacher discovered somehow that a copy of part of the test had been removed from her desk and then returned.  This may even have been a trap she set.

She told us that we were to get together as a group, figure out who had taken it, and report that person to her.  Otherwise, all of us would get incompletes on that portion of the test.  (I doubt she would have followed through on this, but we didn't know that). 

Ultimately, we did get it figured out after several hours.  When I told my parents, my dad thought it was brilliant teaching; my mom called the superintendent of schools the next morning.  I tend to agree with my dad.  I learned a lot that day and remember a lot of it very clearly!

HGolightly:
My eighth grade teacher was like this as well as my fourth grade math teacher.  One such punishment day, my 8th grade teacher kept us all in from a track and field day as punishment for the behaviour of "the usual suspects". I told him it was unfair so he offered me the reward of doing marking for him....gee....thanks. I told him no thank you, I would rather earn the punishment and called him a petty tyrant.

I was part of a gifted and enrichment class that met once a cycle for the entire afternoon. We were pulled from our regular classes for this and it was wonderful.  Our math teacher gave us double the math work to make up for the next day because we could figure it out if we were soooo special.  He usually introduced new math concepts on those days. Eventually the parents found out and objected to this.

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