Author Topic: Paying for the school musical  (Read 8972 times)

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JoieGirl7

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Re: Paying for the school musical
« Reply #15 on: May 06, 2014, 10:41:21 PM »
You say that she is a generous friend.  Should I take that to mean that she brings treats for your daughter and gives her presents and/or money on birthdays and other gift giving holidays?

If that is the case, then I think you should pay for the extra ticket and count yourself lucky to have a friend who is so positivley invested in your child.  Think of it as creating your own VIP list.

If we were talking about tickets that cost a hundred dollars, i might advise differently just because of the burden of the cost, but at $15-$30 you are essentially arguing a principle with her. Let her "win." Sometimes what we gain by letting someone else win is far greater than what we would have if we "won."

purple

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Re: Paying for the school musical
« Reply #16 on: May 06, 2014, 10:43:53 PM »
I also agree with the consensus.

Proper invitation = host pays.
Notification = everyone pays for themselves.

JenJay

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Re: Paying for the school musical
« Reply #17 on: May 06, 2014, 10:44:44 PM »
Thanks for the quick responses.

I never offered to pay, she just immediately reminded me what her philosophy is so I wouldn't think she'd be paying. After she made that clear, I figured I had no real choice but to keep things civil by splitting the diff -- paying for the first night, and telling her she's on her own for the second night.

Her attendance at these things with our family is just assumed, and most events don't cost money, so I guess it hasn't come up before.

Personally, I wouldn't invite her to any more paid events. Her rationale doesn't make any sense to me. If you called her up and said "DD's event will be Date at Time and we'd love for you to join us. Can I get you a ticket?" Fine. I can't imagine ever saying to anyone "Hey, I want to go to that thing but I have this policy against paying for stuff if *circumstance* so I'll need you to pay." Um no.

Be ready for when she find out there was an event and you didn't invite her. Something like "I know how you feel about paying for school things, and we weren't able to cover you, so I didn't want to put you on the spot by asking."

Oh Joy

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Re: Paying for the school musical
« Reply #18 on: May 06, 2014, 11:09:53 PM »
How about this approach? 

'I know!  These ticket prices for kids' shows are completely out of hand!   I have to go - I'm her mom - but you certainly don't.  You're such a steady presence in her life that she's not going to mind if you don't go to the paid events.  I'll be sure to show you the pictures of her in her costume.'

Delivered breezily in your own words, of course.

LifeOnPluto

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Re: Paying for the school musical
« Reply #19 on: May 06, 2014, 11:18:59 PM »
My first reaction is that your friend is being a little... tacky and demanding, in expecting you to pay for her tickets. Then I read this:

You say that she is a generous friend.  Should I take that to mean that she brings treats for your daughter and gives her presents and/or money on birthdays and other gift giving holidays?

If that is the case, then I think you should pay for the extra ticket and count yourself lucky to have a friend who is so positivley invested in your child.  Think of it as creating your own VIP list.

If we were talking about tickets that cost a hundred dollars, i might advise differently just because of the burden of the cost, but at $15-$30 you are essentially arguing a principle with her. Let her "win." Sometimes what we gain by letting someone else win is far greater than what we would have if we "won."

If she's generous in other areas, I'd spring $10-$15 for a ticket (only for the first night though - I think paying for the same show twice is a bit much).

That said, I don't think you'd be rude in nicely telling her that everyone pays for their own ticket, and you'll understand if she prefers to skip the paid events in future.

Sweetling

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Re: Paying for the school musical
« Reply #20 on: May 06, 2014, 11:28:30 PM »
I was touched by JoieGirl7's post too. BFF does deserve a win.

But we're generous too. BFF eats a lot of home-cooked gourmet food here, and DH sometimes helps fix things at her house. It's a real friendship - there's a lot of giving on all sides.

If I do pay for both nights, I think I will tell her that the second night is a gift, not to be a permanent expectation.

aussie_chick

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Re: Paying for the school musical
« Reply #21 on: May 07, 2014, 04:46:33 AM »
If I feel like i've been invited to something i'm expected to attend - e.g more of a summons than an invite then sure I expect the parents to pay. Likewise if I get the old "oh but you have to go. Little Johnny will be devastated if cool aunty aussie_chick isn't there"
If it's something I ask if I can go to or inform that i'm going to because I really want to, then I pay.

Sweetling

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Re: Paying for the school musical
« Reply #22 on: May 07, 2014, 07:33:41 AM »
It's kind of a mutual ongoing thing. We assume she'll come to nearly everything because she absolutely, positively wants to see my girl's events. So far, most of them have been free.

DianeRN

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Re: Paying for the school musical
« Reply #23 on: May 07, 2014, 07:41:29 AM »
First, I think some people are thinking of a different type of show. Most shows that are all or most kids, like the Christmas pageant, are generally still free. The OP is talking about a full production with stages, sets, months of rehearsals. Those usually have a fairly reasonable charge.

Second, my niece and nephews live two hours away. When we go down for their shows, sporting events, whatever, we always pay our own way. Sometimes, my BIL tries to pay but we feel that it our choice to be there because we love seeing the kids and it shouldn't cost them for our admissions.

etiquettenut

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Re: Paying for the school musical
« Reply #24 on: May 07, 2014, 07:55:22 AM »
You say that she is a generous friend.  Should I take that to mean that she brings treats for your daughter and gives her presents and/or money on birthdays and other gift giving holidays?

If that is the case, then I think you should pay for the extra ticket and count yourself lucky to have a friend who is so positivley invested in your child.  Think of it as creating your own VIP list.

If we were talking about tickets that cost a hundred dollars, i might advise differently just because of the burden of the cost, but at $15-$30 you are essentially arguing a principle with her. Let her "win." Sometimes what we gain by letting someone else win is far greater than what we would have if we "won."

I actually disagree with this because of the principle. This is not a one time deal; similar opportunities will only increase as the OP's child gets older. Should the OP be on the hook for paying for everything her BFF wants to attend? I think that this sets a dangerous precedent.

I also think BFF is completely off here and have never heard of her philosophy. Sure, if OP was inviting her I could see her expecting her ticket to be paid for. But the OP didn't invite her, she invited herself and then announced OP can pay for her. I think she was pretty rude actually. And a second show? No way!

I would go with the "different philosophies" wording from above because I think this is something that should be addressed since it will probably keep coming up in the future.

shhh its me

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Re: Paying for the school musical
« Reply #25 on: May 07, 2014, 08:06:22 AM »
My first reaction is that your friend is being a little... tacky and demanding, in expecting you to pay for her tickets. Then I read this:

You say that she is a generous friend.  Should I take that to mean that she brings treats for your daughter and gives her presents and/or money on birthdays and other gift giving holidays?

If that is the case, then I think you should pay for the extra ticket and count yourself lucky to have a friend who is so positivley invested in your child.  Think of it as creating your own VIP list.

If we were talking about tickets that cost a hundred dollars, i might advise differently just because of the burden of the cost, but at $15-$30 you are essentially arguing a principle with her. Let her "win." Sometimes what we gain by letting someone else win is far greater than what we would have if we "won."

If she's generous in other areas, I'd spring $10-$15 for a ticket (only for the first night though - I think paying for the same show twice is a bit much).

That said, I don't think you'd be rude in nicely telling her that everyone pays for their own ticket, and you'll understand if she prefers to skip the paid events in future.

I still think she's being rude and demanding and completely wrong  BUT friends stance on this is a known " quirk" so I think that mitigates it a little. Not in the sense that making your owns rules well know makes it polite but in the sense that you have the opportunity to just not invite her. 

Plus with everyone we have to weigh whether they are "worth putting up with their quirks" OP likes friend enough to tolerate this quirk.

Harriet Jones

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Re: Paying for the school musical
« Reply #26 on: May 07, 2014, 08:26:26 AM »
I find the friend's philosophy a little off, too -- she invites herself to the event and expects the OP to pay for her.  Since there does seem to be a lot of reciprocity in the relationship, I don't see any problem with paying for the first night's ticket only.

Also, since this is something that's likely to continue, the OP should make it clear up front to the friend exactly what she is willing to pay for.

Owly

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Re: Paying for the school musical
« Reply #27 on: May 07, 2014, 08:40:35 AM »
It's kind of a mutual ongoing thing. We assume she'll come to nearly everything because she absolutely, positively wants to see my girl's events. So far, most of them have been free.

Wow, no, I'm sorry. No matter how close you are or how generous she is, it's way over the top to basically be telling you that she's going to be attending all of your daughter's events on your dime. I would nip this in the bud now, I can't believe how entitled it is. I'd tell her I'd treat her this time, to one show, but it's not in my budget to pay for her to go to every event, and if that means she chooses not to go I'll totally understand. Since she is so close, I think you can be upfront about how (as others have said) your philosophies differ.

I'd still invite her once in awhile when I could afford to pay (and wanted to), otherwise she would be on her own.

TootsNYC

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Re: Paying for the school musical
« Reply #28 on: May 07, 2014, 08:46:54 AM »
You say that she is a generous friend.  Should I take that to mean that she brings treats for your daughter and gives her presents and/or money on birthdays and other gift giving holidays?

If that is the case, then I think you should pay for the extra ticket and count yourself lucky to have a friend who is so positivley invested in your child.  Think of it as creating your own VIP list.

If we were talking about tickets that cost a hundred dollars, i might advise differently just because of the burden of the cost, but at $15-$30 you are essentially arguing a principle with her. Let her "win." Sometimes what we gain by letting someone else win is far greater than what we would have if we "won."

I actually disagree with this because of the principle. This is not a one time deal; similar opportunities will only increase as the OP's child gets older. Should the OP be on the hook for paying for everything her BFF wants to attend? I think that this sets a dangerous precedent.

I also think BFF is completely off here and have never heard of her philosophy. Sure, if OP was inviting her I could see her expecting her ticket to be paid for. But the OP didn't invite her, she invited herself and then announced OP can pay for her. I think she was pretty rude actually. And a second show? No way!

I would go with the "different philosophies" wording from above because I think this is something that should be addressed since it will probably keep coming up in the future.

I am glad I'm not the only one having this reaction!

I think the principle would be enough for me to say, "You know, I don't agree with you. I know it's only $15, but it's also only $15 for you. And it's not the money. We aren't pressuring you to attend. If you want to come, you should come. I don't like feeling that I am purchasing your friendship for our daughters."


(I also think that getting an invitation that is more like a summons, or  getting a guilt trip, has -nothing- to do with whether you buy your own ticket. I believe that unless you are explicitly invited, you pay your own way. Period. Being able to resist a guilt trip is part of being a grownup; and if you aren't able to do it, well, consider that a practice round, with an built-in negative reinforcer.)

KarenK

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Re: Paying for the school musical
« Reply #29 on: May 07, 2014, 08:59:30 AM »
While I'm torn on paying for the Friday show, I absolutely would not pay for the Saturday show. No way, no how. That is a choice that BFF has made to attend more than one show.

I might pay for the Friday show, but sit down with her and let her know that this is the last time I will be doing this. As the OP's daughter gets older, and if she continues to perform, it could start getting really pricy to be covering tickets for the performances.

See, I think BFF has overplayed her hand. The OP sort of expects to pay for her ticket when she goes with them, but by demanding that they pay for the Saturday ticket too, she has pushed too far. This might result in the cessation of ticket coverage for good.