Author Topic: Television Series  (Read 2211 times)

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lady_disdain

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Television Series
« on: May 12, 2014, 09:25:51 AM »
Ok, please help me out. I am hopelessly confused by television series having "seasons".

Here in Brazil, television series run continuously through the year: a novela will have a new episode daily, miniseries usually run daily as well for two or three weeks, sitcoms and dramas will have a new episode weekly, for example, throughout the year. A year's worth of programming will be around 250 episodes for a novela (every weekday) or around 52 episodes for a weekly. However, it seems that US and British shows don't run through out the year, so a year's worth of a weekly show will only be 20-26 episodes. Is this right? When are the new episodes run and what is shown during the rest of the year?

oz diva

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Re: Television Series
« Reply #1 on: May 12, 2014, 09:36:43 AM »
Here in Australia what you call a novella sounds like what we call a soap opera. A new episode, slowly progressing the story every week day.

Other shows are things like series which have anything from 8 to 20+ episodes, usually only shown once a week. With repeat screenings at less favourable times during the week.

There are reality shows, cooking, home maintenance etc. News and current affairs.

Other shows (to fill up the time) are repeat screenings of old shows eg Friends, Seinfield or The Simpsons.

We have about 30 free to air TV stations in Australia and cable TV, I don't have cable myself.

Victoria

veronaz

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Re: Television Series
« Reply #2 on: May 12, 2014, 09:41:29 AM »
Here in the US a new network television season usually begins in September (although that sometimes varies).  A drama or comedy series lasts about 13 weeks.  If a show has low ratings/poor viewer reception, it can be canceled after a few weeks or even sooner.  After the season finale, reruns are sometimes shown or the spot is filled with a replacement show for the summer.

Soap operas air a new episode every weekday.  Some talk shows air new episodes year-round (but periodically air repeat  episodes).
« Last Edit: May 12, 2014, 09:43:10 AM by veronaz »

lady_disdain

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Re: Television Series
« Reply #3 on: May 12, 2014, 11:22:08 AM »
That sounds like a lot of reruns on prime time! But now I understand why people look forward to season premieres so much. Thanks!

PastryGoddess

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Re: Television Series
« Reply #4 on: May 12, 2014, 11:38:02 AM »
A full season of shows on network television is ~22 episodes and start in the fall. Most premium cable shows have a full season of only 13 episodes. They can start in the fall or spring.   Networks television shows that are introduced mid-season in the spring may only go for 13 episodes to see how their ratings are.  If they do well, then they are picked up for a full season in the fall. 

There are also 1-2 week breaks  in the fall for sporting events such as the world series

camlan

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Re: Television Series
« Reply #5 on: May 12, 2014, 11:42:49 AM »
Part of the confusion may come from the fact that British and US tv use the words "season" and "series" differently.

In the US, a tv show is also called a tv series. Each year that the show/series is on air, it has a new season. So, The Big Bang Theory, a tv series, first aired in 2007. Another way to say this is that the first season of TBBT was in 2007, the second season started in 2008, and so on.

For British tv, as least the shows from the BBC that we get here in the US, the word "series" seems to be used in the way the US uses the word "season." So the 4th "series" of Downton Abbey in the UK becomes the 4th "season" of Downton Abbey in the US.

In the US, regular tv series usually have 20-22 episodes a year. These are aired twice during the year. Frequently, a network will show the first 10 or 11 episodes, then re-run them, then show the last 10-11 episodes and re-run them. This month, a lot of series are showing their final episodes of the "TV year."

Over the summer, there will either be more re-runs or special summer replacement series, which have fewer individual episodes than the standard series that start in September/October. Under the Dome is a summer replacement series that did fairly well last summer and is coming back for a second summer season of 13 episodes. I think Buffy the Vampire Slayer started as a summer series but made it to full-time status.

And many of the cable networks, as opposed to the big broadcast networks (ABC, NBC, CBS, etc.) will start shows at various times during the year. There's probably a pattern to when they start a new season or a new series, but I haven't figured it out yet.
Nothing is impossible, the word itself says, “I’m possible!” –Audrey Hepburn


Library Dragon

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Re: Television Series
« Reply #6 on: May 12, 2014, 03:10:25 PM »
Fortunately we are getting more summer replacement series in the US.  There are some programs (Under the Dome is a good example) that could quickly get irritating if it had a 26 episode story arc instead of the shorter 13 episode run.  Instead I'm excited that it's coming back. 

It gives me as a viewer more television series (US usage) to watch instead of reruns. 

On a totally unrelated, but related, note:  My DISH receiver had a hard drive failure yesterday and so I missed all my Sunday evening programs.   Arrrrggghhhh! 

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camlan

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Re: Television Series
« Reply #7 on: May 12, 2014, 03:29:38 PM »
I often wish we had more than 22 new episodes of my favorite shows each year. I'm rather jealous that the OP can get 52 new episodes of a tv show yearly.

As for what is shown when there aren't new episodes--the summer or mid-season replacement series, re-runs and specials--sporting events, awards shows, concerts, holiday broadcasts (for example, there's a Memorial Day concert in Washington, DC, that's televised every year).

There's Monday Night Football every fall/winter, which displaces Monday night tv shows. The Fox channel is always bumping tv shows for various sports. (I gave up watching Star Trek: Deep Space Nine because I could never find out when it was on, because it was bumped for either football or baseball so much.) During March, college basketball preempts a lot of shows.

So, except at the beginning of a new season and during May sweeps (when the networks are putting out their best work), you basically never know what will be on when you sit down to watch your favorite show--a new episode, a re-run, or something else entirely. Unless you spend a lot of time online tracking down this stuff.
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lady_disdain

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Re: Television Series
« Reply #8 on: May 12, 2014, 03:38:15 PM »
Don't be - most local shows aren't that good. They tend to be comedy and my sense of humour is certainly not compatible (too much slap stick, sex and cringe worthy jokes).

But all the sports messing up the scheduling would drive me crazy.

PastryGoddess

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Re: Television Series
« Reply #9 on: May 12, 2014, 04:48:06 PM »
Don't be - most local shows aren't that good. They tend to be comedy and my sense of humour is certainly not compatible (too much slap stick, sex and cringe worthy jokes).

But all the sports messing up the scheduling would drive me crazy.

Luckily the sports are confined to only a few network stations.  However, when it's a major sporting event, most networks will air re-runs for a week or two. They know that most of their audience will be watching the sporting event and don't want to waste a new episode. 

Although I just realized that the cable networks didn't start their season premiere's until April AFTER March Madness was over:)


English1

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Re: Television Series
« Reply #10 on: May 13, 2014, 11:22:02 AM »
It depends on the scale of the programme as well. Big budget dramas with multiple settings, lots of sets, characters etc, take a lot of time to prepare for and film.

Example - Game of Thrones series one - ten episodes. Filmed between July and December 2010 in Northern Island (rumours of over 50 different locations there) and in Malta. You simply couldn't churn out the same quality of programme at one a week :-)

nayberry

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Re: Television Series
« Reply #11 on: May 14, 2014, 03:02:20 PM »
plus we only get 3 Sherlock episodes every other year :/

Carotte

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Re: Television Series
« Reply #12 on: May 14, 2014, 03:16:47 PM »
What always makes me wonder is when a tv serie doesn't have a new episodes for one or two week...
I'm not in the US and use a website who tells me what was/will be broadcasted this month (for the shows I choose).
And you mostly get always the same shows always the same days, for exemple Bones every tuesdays (broadcasted on monday in the US, I watch it later), but sometimes there's no new episode for a few weeks...
Sometimes it's replaced by sport I guess, but otherwise I have no idea.

magicdomino

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Re: Television Series
« Reply #13 on: May 14, 2014, 04:00:03 PM »
What always makes me wonder is when a tv serie doesn't have a new episodes for one or two week...I'm not in the US and use a website who tells me what was/will be broadcasted this month (for the shows I choose).
And you mostly get always the same shows always the same days, for exemple Bones every tuesdays (broadcasted on monday in the US, I watch it later), but sometimes there's no new episode for a few weeks...
Sometimes it's replaced by sport I guess, but otherwise I have no idea.

Two reasons that I can think of off-hand:

1.  Stretching out the available episodes.  Broadcast channels like CBS and NBC have "sweeps" months during which careful counts are made of the number of viewers.  In turn, these numbers affect the price that the broadcasters can charge for ads.  So, they make sure their best episodes show during sweeps months.  In order to do that, they may run repeats for a week or two to make sure things work out on time.

2.  Low potential viewers.  There's something else going on that will draw most of the regular viewers, so why waste a new episode.  The Super Bowl is an excellent example.  The hosting channel usually shows a new episode of whatever series they are promoting, but the other broadcasters stick with reruns.  March has a lot of reruns because of March Madness basketball games.  In December, viewers either want to watch Christmas specials, or simply have other things to do.  Until the last few years, summer was rerun season because people would go away on vacation to places that either have poor reception or more interesting things to do at night.

Cable television is a whole 'nother world with rules of its own.  I have no idea what's going on there.   :)

PastryGoddess

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Re: Television Series
« Reply #14 on: May 14, 2014, 04:07:59 PM »
What always makes me wonder is when a tv serie doesn't have a new episodes for one or two week...
I'm not in the US and use a website who tells me what was/will be broadcasted this month (for the shows I choose).
And you mostly get always the same shows always the same days, for exemple Bones every tuesdays (broadcasted on monday in the US, I watch it later), but sometimes there's no new episode for a few weeks...
Sometimes it's replaced by sport I guess, but otherwise I have no idea.


It's either been pre-empted by sports OR it could have been replaced by a mid-season replacement series due to low ratings.  The rest of the episodes will usually air in the summer to finish the season. 


Or what magicdomino said  ;D