Author Topic: Cool Whip, why???  (Read 6412 times)

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ladyknight1

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Re: Cool Whip, why???
« Reply #75 on: June 13, 2014, 01:53:02 PM »
Even the largest of the large stores, Wal-mart, has freshly baked Cuban and French bread several times a day, plus the varieties of sandwich bread and sweet bread.

For the gelatin questions, I like to make a gelatin salad with fruit in it, to have with my lunch.

123sandy

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Re: Cool Whip, why???
« Reply #76 on: June 13, 2014, 02:22:42 PM »
I have seen mention of Jello cookbooks and Jello salads - as a naive aussie (I have tried Cool Whip, spent 6 weeks in the USA on exchange, it was not to my taste) can someone please elaborate?

Is a Jello salad a dessert or does it actually form part of a salad/side - what are they made of/what do you eat with

I confess, a lot of the US foods I tried when I visited (after seeing them on TV for years) - or even just things like bread, cereal etc were far too sweet - I know that other friends/family have reported similar reactions.  I wouldn't have thought there would be too much difference between products in AUS and USA - have others noticed anything similar, or have USA visitors found that Aussie foods aren't sweet enough?

What else do you use Cool Whip with? I'm trying to think of an Australian equivalent...

I can't eat the bread. Too sweet, nasty texture. I find a lot of their food too sweet for my taste.

I can appreciate that you don't enjoy eating bread in the United States, but I think saying it has "nasty" texture is a little bit uncalled for. Surely there are other adjectives that would describe what you dislike about it?

I would also like to point out, for the record, that the bread available in the United States is as varied as anywhere else in the world (if not more so). There's everything from national companies that sell pre-packaged bread in the grocery store to the small bakery around the corner. It's not like the US has one homogenous style of bread that is the only type available.

No, to me the texture is nasty. It's claggy and sticks to the roof of the mouth. I have tried many brands of US bread and find them all to be similar, I'm not basing this on one slice of wonder bread. You don't have to feel bad for liking it, it's what you've grown up with and what you're used to.

Dindrane

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Re: Cool Whip, why???
« Reply #77 on: June 13, 2014, 03:54:30 PM »
I have seen mention of Jello cookbooks and Jello salads - as a naive aussie (I have tried Cool Whip, spent 6 weeks in the USA on exchange, it was not to my taste) can someone please elaborate?

Is a Jello salad a dessert or does it actually form part of a salad/side - what are they made of/what do you eat with

I confess, a lot of the US foods I tried when I visited (after seeing them on TV for years) - or even just things like bread, cereal etc were far too sweet - I know that other friends/family have reported similar reactions.  I wouldn't have thought there would be too much difference between products in AUS and USA - have others noticed anything similar, or have USA visitors found that Aussie foods aren't sweet enough?

What else do you use Cool Whip with? I'm trying to think of an Australian equivalent...

I can't eat the bread. Too sweet, nasty texture. I find a lot of their food too sweet for my taste.

I can appreciate that you don't enjoy eating bread in the United States, but I think saying it has "nasty" texture is a little bit uncalled for. Surely there are other adjectives that would describe what you dislike about it?

I would also like to point out, for the record, that the bread available in the United States is as varied as anywhere else in the world (if not more so). There's everything from national companies that sell pre-packaged bread in the grocery store to the small bakery around the corner. It's not like the US has one homogenous style of bread that is the only type available.

No, to me the texture is nasty. It's claggy and sticks to the roof of the mouth. I have tried many brands of US bread and find them all to be similar, I'm not basing this on one slice of wonder bread. You don't have to feel bad for liking it, it's what you've grown up with and what you're used to.

I'm not sure what the word "claggy" means, but I think that even if you personally find a particular style of food to be "nasty", good manners dictates that you find a different adjective to describe what you don't like about it when sharing your opinion in mixed company. Calling food "nasty" is insulting to people who enjoy that food, and telling me it's okay because it's what I grew up with (with the strong implication that it's okay because I don't know any better) does not make it less insulting.

Aside from that, not all bread for sale in the US is branded, and much of what you would find baked fresh would be not substantially different than what you can find in bakeries around the world. Much of the bread that is pre-packaged and branded is what I would call "sandwich bread," so it tends to conform to a similar style because it's intended to serve a similar purpose. I personally rarely eat pre-packaged bread because I prefer other styles, so I buy it from the bakery section in my grocery store or go to an actual bakery to get it.


lowspark

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Re: Cool Whip, why???
« Reply #78 on: June 13, 2014, 04:39:04 PM »
I have seen mention of Jello cookbooks and Jello salads - as a naive aussie (I have tried Cool Whip, spent 6 weeks in the USA on exchange, it was not to my taste) can someone please elaborate?

Is a Jello salad a dessert or does it actually form part of a salad/side - what are they made of/what do you eat with

I confess, a lot of the US foods I tried when I visited (after seeing them on TV for years) - or even just things like bread, cereal etc were far too sweet - I know that other friends/family have reported similar reactions.  I wouldn't have thought there would be too much difference between products in AUS and USA - have others noticed anything similar, or have USA visitors found that Aussie foods aren't sweet enough?

What else do you use Cool Whip with? I'm trying to think of an Australian equivalent...

I can't eat the bread. Too sweet, nasty texture. I find a lot of their food too sweet for my taste.

I can appreciate that you don't enjoy eating bread in the United States, but I think saying it has "nasty" texture is a little bit uncalled for. Surely there are other adjectives that would describe what you dislike about it?

I would also like to point out, for the record, that the bread available in the United States is as varied as anywhere else in the world (if not more so). There's everything from national companies that sell pre-packaged bread in the grocery store to the small bakery around the corner. It's not like the US has one homogenous style of bread that is the only type available.

No, to me the texture is nasty. It's claggy and sticks to the roof of the mouth. I have tried many brands of US bread and find them all to be similar, I'm not basing this on one slice of wonder bread. You don't have to feel bad for liking it, it's what you've grown up with and what you're used to.

I'm not sure what the word "claggy" means, but I think that even if you personally find a particular style of food to be "nasty", good manners dictates that you find a different adjective to describe what you don't like about it when sharing your opinion in mixed company. Calling food "nasty" is insulting to people who enjoy that food, and telling me it's okay because it's what I grew up with (with the strong implication that it's okay because I don't know any better) does not make it less insulting.

Aside from that, not all bread for sale in the US is branded, and much of what you would find baked fresh would be not substantially different than what you can find in bakeries around the world. Much of the bread that is pre-packaged and branded is what I would call "sandwich bread," so it tends to conform to a similar style because it's intended to serve a similar purpose. I personally rarely eat pre-packaged bread because I prefer other styles, so I buy it from the bakery section in my grocery store or go to an actual bakery to get it.

POD to everything Dindrane said. I, personally, haven't eaten branded prepackaged bread in years. I always buy bakery fresh bread. I know exactly what you mean when you describe the branded bread and it's fine that you don't like it. I don't much care for it either.

However, that is not the only kind of bread available in the US as several of us have already pointed out. In fact, the great thing about the grocery stores I have access to is that I can get pretty much any kind of bread I want. Freshly baked. And the only "brand" on them is the name of the grocery store in whose kitchen, on site, where they were just baked. French bread, Italian bread, bagels, pita, naan, tortillas, sourdough, whole grain, rye, pumpernickel, etc. The list goes on. I can't even think of all the different kinds. And none of them are like the "many brands of US bread" that you have apparently tried.

veryfluffy

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Re: Cool Whip, why???
« Reply #79 on: June 13, 2014, 05:50:33 PM »
It all makes me wonder how, uh, different this packaged bread is! I bake most of my own bread, but for a real treat I buy a fluffy white bread by Warburtons, one of the biggest brands in the UK. It makes the most amazing toast -- to me, nothing compares with its toasty wonderfulness with some good butter. DH also likes it "raw" (ie untoasted), although I can't eat sliced white bread that way.

Does the US packaged stuff at least toast nicely?
   

jmarvellous

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Re: Cool Whip, why???
« Reply #80 on: June 13, 2014, 06:04:39 PM »
Veryfluffy, I don't know about UK bread, but I looked up the ingredients and nutrition information in multigrain and whole wheat US and Australian breads, and they were essentially indistinguishable.

My thought is that you can find cheap or bad food anywhere.

I don't know what bread doesn't toast well, really.

Bottlecaps

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Re: Cool Whip, why???
« Reply #81 on: June 14, 2014, 12:28:18 AM »
I've only had real whipped cream once, and I liked it. My family uses Cool Whip in many, many things though - most likely for the convenience. I really do like Cool Whip too.

All this Cool Whip talk made me crave a piece of cake that we have here, topped with Cool Whip icing. :-P I much prefer Cool Whip icing to buttercream. (Buttercream is just too sweet for me.)
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melbelle39

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Re: Cool Whip, why???
« Reply #82 on: June 14, 2014, 06:58:38 AM »
Thank you for the responses, I hope I didn't offend anyone, I certainly know that everywhere has variety - especially somewhere as large as the United States.

We travelled pretty widely, and true there wasn't a lot of home cooking - but eating out from fancy restaurants to casual cafes and hot dog carts... and I did find things to be sweeter than I was used to.
It was not a criticism, just an observation.

When I was in the Uk, I also noticed that the same brands taste totally different - Cadburys for example (I prefer the UK stuff)

I kind of think I know an equivalent of a jello salad here - we kind of use it as a snack/dessert....

For those that have been to Australia - how did you find our food in comparison (apart from so much more expensive - just like everything else)

Oh - and Do they still make Girl Scout Thin Mints.... I love those things

Yvaine

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Re: Cool Whip, why???
« Reply #83 on: June 14, 2014, 10:05:16 AM »
Thank you for the responses, I hope I didn't offend anyone, I certainly know that everywhere has variety - especially somewhere as large as the United States.

We travelled pretty widely, and true there wasn't a lot of home cooking - but eating out from fancy restaurants to casual cafes and hot dog carts... and I did find things to be sweeter than I was used to.
It was not a criticism, just an observation.

When I was in the Uk, I also noticed that the same brands taste totally different - Cadburys for example (I prefer the UK stuff)

I kind of think I know an equivalent of a jello salad here - we kind of use it as a snack/dessert....

For those that have been to Australia - how did you find our food in comparison (apart from so much more expensive - just like everything else)

Oh - and Do they still make Girl Scout Thin Mints.... I love those things

Nah, it wasn't the "sweet" descriptor that bugged anyone. :) It was subsequent posts about "nastiness" and the like. Sometimes these Trans-Atlantic threads sort of spiral down into "America: Why do you eat such horrible gross food, and wash it down with a cup of gasoline?" and it kind of wears on the nerves after a while.  ;D And there's more diversity of food here than people sometimes realize.

But having something be sweeter than you expect--I get that. I got annoyed at Outback a while ago because I ordered this fish dish with two sides and for whatever reason they'd made all three dishes sweet, so there was no contrast, nowhere to rest the taste buds between bites of sweet stuff, if you will.

And yes, they do still make Girl Scout Thin Mints! They're practically a religion. If you ever want a similar taste when it's not GS cookie season, Keebler's Grasshopper cookies are very similar and are inexpensive.

perpetua

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Re: Cool Whip, why???
« Reply #84 on: June 14, 2014, 10:37:47 AM »
Thank you for the responses, I hope I didn't offend anyone, I certainly know that everywhere has variety - especially somewhere as large as the United States.

We travelled pretty widely, and true there wasn't a lot of home cooking - but eating out from fancy restaurants to casual cafes and hot dog carts... and I did find things to be sweeter than I was used to.
It was not a criticism, just an observation.

When I was in the Uk, I also noticed that the same brands taste totally different - Cadburys for example (I prefer the UK stuff)

I kind of think I know an equivalent of a jello salad here - we kind of use it as a snack/dessert....

For those that have been to Australia - how did you find our food in comparison (apart from so much more expensive - just like everything else)

Oh - and Do they still make Girl Scout Thin Mints.... I love those things

Nah, it wasn't the "sweet" descriptor that bugged anyone. :) It was subsequent posts about "nastiness" and the like. Sometimes these Trans-Atlantic threads sort of spiral down into "America: Why do you eat such horrible gross food, and wash it down with a cup of gasoline?" and it kind of wears on the nerves after a while.  ;D And there's more diversity of food here than people sometimes realize.


Actually - it isn't that. It really isn't. I think there are cultural issues at work even in the threads. "Nasty" isn't an offensive word here and I was suprised that anyone took offense at what the PP was saying. It's just descriptive to mean "unpleasant" and it isn't rude to say you find something unpleasant, even if someone else does like it (it seems to be in America, though. This is the second time this "yucking someone's yum" issue has come up in a week. British people generally are not offended by someone saying they find something that they like unpleasant and sad to say I do find people who are to be extremely oversensitive). I totally understood what the PP was saying. She was simply saying she found something unpleasant and there really isn't anything wrong with that.

Similarly, from the opposite side of the coin, sometimes *I* feel like the transatlantic threads spiral into "Rest of the world: Why don't you like what we like? Everything here is better than what you have, and if you say you don't like it we're going to be offended by a) that opinion and b) your perfectly innocuous word choices!" and that also really wears on the nerves too - it works both ways :)

Can't we all just get along and realise that not everyone likes the same things and that's OK and nobody's being offensive by saying so? :)

Now, what's a Thin Mint? Is it like an After Eight mint? If so, they sound delicious.

Yvaine

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Re: Cool Whip, why???
« Reply #85 on: June 14, 2014, 10:48:51 AM »
Thank you for the responses, I hope I didn't offend anyone, I certainly know that everywhere has variety - especially somewhere as large as the United States.

We travelled pretty widely, and true there wasn't a lot of home cooking - but eating out from fancy restaurants to casual cafes and hot dog carts... and I did find things to be sweeter than I was used to.
It was not a criticism, just an observation.

When I was in the Uk, I also noticed that the same brands taste totally different - Cadburys for example (I prefer the UK stuff)

I kind of think I know an equivalent of a jello salad here - we kind of use it as a snack/dessert....

For those that have been to Australia - how did you find our food in comparison (apart from so much more expensive - just like everything else)

Oh - and Do they still make Girl Scout Thin Mints.... I love those things

Nah, it wasn't the "sweet" descriptor that bugged anyone. :) It was subsequent posts about "nastiness" and the like. Sometimes these Trans-Atlantic threads sort of spiral down into "America: Why do you eat such horrible gross food, and wash it down with a cup of gasoline?" and it kind of wears on the nerves after a while.  ;D And there's more diversity of food here than people sometimes realize.


Actually - it isn't that. It really isn't. I think there are cultural issues at work even in the threads. "Nasty" isn't an offensive word here and I was suprised that anyone took offense at what the PP was saying. It's just descriptive to mean "unpleasant" and it isn't rude to say you find something unpleasant, even if someone else does like it (it seems to be in America, though. This is the second time this "yucking someone's yum" issue has come up in a week. British people generally are not offended by someone saying they find something that they like unpleasant and sad to say I do find people who are to be extremely oversensitive). I totally understood what the PP was saying. She was simply saying she found something unpleasant and there really isn't anything wrong with that.

Similarly, from the opposite side of the coin, sometimes *I* feel like the transatlantic threads spiral into "Rest of the world: Why don't you like what we like? Everything here is better than what you have, and if you say you don't like it we're going to be offended by a) that opinion and b) your perfectly innocuous word choices!" and that also really wears on the nerves too - it works both ways :)

Can't we all just get along and realise that not everyone likes the same things and that's OK and nobody's being offensive by saying so? :)

Now, what's a Thin Mint? Is it like an After Eight mint? If so, they sound delicious.

Oh! That's something I didn't know about "nasty"--I guess that's some more useful trans-Atlantic knowledge. :) Nasty is pretty bad here. Not like a swear word or anything, but it's way stronger than "unpleasant" and it's like saying "That's disgusting garbage."

A Thin Mint is a cookie (biscuit possibly, for you?). The inside is chocolate cookie with mint flavor in it, and it's coated in chocolate.

nayberry

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Re: Cool Whip, why???
« Reply #86 on: June 14, 2014, 10:53:21 AM »
Melbelle - i spent a few years in Oz and i agree the cadburys is very different, although since kraft took them over the uk ones seem to have changed somewhat.
i found seafood much more accessible and the chip shops had some of the flakiest loveliest fried fish i've ever had.

and when we were there the prices were good, think it was 3$aus to the ish. 

i do miss timtams, i can get them in the UK but not all the fab flavours,  a friend sent me some of the orange ones!!!  CRUD MONKEYS!!

perpetua

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Re: Cool Whip, why???
« Reply #87 on: June 14, 2014, 10:58:33 AM »
Thank you for the responses, I hope I didn't offend anyone, I certainly know that everywhere has variety - especially somewhere as large as the United States.

We travelled pretty widely, and true there wasn't a lot of home cooking - but eating out from fancy restaurants to casual cafes and hot dog carts... and I did find things to be sweeter than I was used to.
It was not a criticism, just an observation.

When I was in the Uk, I also noticed that the same brands taste totally different - Cadburys for example (I prefer the UK stuff)

I kind of think I know an equivalent of a jello salad here - we kind of use it as a snack/dessert....

For those that have been to Australia - how did you find our food in comparison (apart from so much more expensive - just like everything else)

Oh - and Do they still make Girl Scout Thin Mints.... I love those things

Nah, it wasn't the "sweet" descriptor that bugged anyone. :) It was subsequent posts about "nastiness" and the like. Sometimes these Trans-Atlantic threads sort of spiral down into "America: Why do you eat such horrible gross food, and wash it down with a cup of gasoline?" and it kind of wears on the nerves after a while.  ;D And there's more diversity of food here than people sometimes realize.


Actually - it isn't that. It really isn't. I think there are cultural issues at work even in the threads. "Nasty" isn't an offensive word here and I was suprised that anyone took offense at what the PP was saying. It's just descriptive to mean "unpleasant" and it isn't rude to say you find something unpleasant, even if someone else does like it (it seems to be in America, though. This is the second time this "yucking someone's yum" issue has come up in a week. British people generally are not offended by someone saying they find something that they like unpleasant and sad to say I do find people who are to be extremely oversensitive). I totally understood what the PP was saying. She was simply saying she found something unpleasant and there really isn't anything wrong with that.

Similarly, from the opposite side of the coin, sometimes *I* feel like the transatlantic threads spiral into "Rest of the world: Why don't you like what we like? Everything here is better than what you have, and if you say you don't like it we're going to be offended by a) that opinion and b) your perfectly innocuous word choices!" and that also really wears on the nerves too - it works both ways :)

Can't we all just get along and realise that not everyone likes the same things and that's OK and nobody's being offensive by saying so? :)

Now, what's a Thin Mint? Is it like an After Eight mint? If so, they sound delicious.

Oh! That's something I didn't know about "nasty"--I guess that's some more useful trans-Atlantic knowledge. :) Nasty is pretty bad here. Not like a swear word or anything, but it's way stronger than "unpleasant" and it's like saying "That's disgusting garbage."


Oh no, it's definitely not that bad here. It just means unpleasant. Actually now you mention it I've heard 'nasty' used on US TV (admittedly on Springer and Jeremy Kyle and the like) to refer to people (usually women) of dubious character too. Like 'skanky'. Yeah. Definitely doesn't mean that here.

I think the best way forward is to assume that someone's not being rude, especially if they're obviously from a different part of the world to you (general). This is an etiquette site, after all, not populated by the sort of folks who'd generally do that.  I just see an awful lot of offence taken where none is intended (and a lot of defensiveness. It's really OK if someone else doesn't like something you like - it's not some terrible slur on your opinions!)

Quote
A Thin Mint is a cookie (biscuit possibly, for you?). The inside is chocolate cookie with mint flavor in it, and it's coated in chocolate.

Oh, that sounds good. Different to an After Eight then. An After Eight is literally a very thin mint - a square of dark chocolate with a centre of mint fondant and they're awesome.


shhh its me

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Re: Cool Whip, why???
« Reply #88 on: June 14, 2014, 12:43:17 PM »
Thank you for the responses, I hope I didn't offend anyone, I certainly know that everywhere has variety - especially somewhere as large as the United States.

We travelled pretty widely, and true there wasn't a lot of home cooking - but eating out from fancy restaurants to casual cafes and hot dog carts... and I did find things to be sweeter than I was used to.
It was not a criticism, just an observation.

When I was in the Uk, I also noticed that the same brands taste totally different - Cadburys for example (I prefer the UK stuff)

I kind of think I know an equivalent of a jello salad here - we kind of use it as a snack/dessert....

For those that have been to Australia - how did you find our food in comparison (apart from so much more expensive - just like everything else)

Oh - and Do they still make Girl Scout Thin Mints.... I love those things

Nah, it wasn't the "sweet" descriptor that bugged anyone. :) It was subsequent posts about "nastiness" and the like. Sometimes these Trans-Atlantic threads sort of spiral down into "America: Why do you eat such horrible gross food, and wash it down with a cup of gasoline?" and it kind of wears on the nerves after a while.  ;D And there's more diversity of food here than people sometimes realize.


Actually - it isn't that. It really isn't. I think there are cultural issues at work even in the threads. "Nasty" isn't an offensive word here and I was suprised that anyone took offense at what the PP was saying. It's just descriptive to mean "unpleasant" and it isn't rude to say you find something unpleasant, even if someone else does like it (it seems to be in America, though. This is the second time this "yucking someone's yum" issue has come up in a week. British people generally are not offended by someone saying they find something that they like unpleasant and sad to say I do find people who are to be extremely oversensitive). I totally understood what the PP was saying. She was simply saying she found something unpleasant and there really isn't anything wrong with that.

Similarly, from the opposite side of the coin, sometimes *I* feel like the transatlantic threads spiral into "Rest of the world: Why don't you like what we like? Everything here is better than what you have, and if you say you don't like it we're going to be offended by a) that opinion and b) your perfectly innocuous word choices!" and that also really wears on the nerves too - it works both ways :)

Can't we all just get along and realise that not everyone likes the same things and that's OK and nobody's being offensive by saying so? :)

Now, what's a Thin Mint? Is it like an After Eight mint? If so, they sound delicious.

Oh! That's something I didn't know about "nasty"--I guess that's some more useful trans-Atlantic knowledge. :) Nasty is pretty bad here. Not like a swear word or anything, but it's way stronger than "unpleasant" and it's like saying "That's disgusting garbage."


Oh no, it's definitely not that bad here. It just means unpleasant. Actually now you mention it I've heard 'nasty' used on US TV (admittedly on Springer and Jeremy Kyle and the like) to refer to people (usually women) of dubious character too. Like 'skanky'. Yeah. Definitely doesn't mean that here.

I think the best way forward is to assume that someone's not being rude, especially if they're obviously from a different part of the world to you (general). This is an etiquette site, after all, not populated by the sort of folks who'd generally do that.  I just see an awful lot of offence taken where none is intended (and a lot of defensiveness. It's really OK if someone else doesn't like something you like - it's not some terrible slur on your opinions!)

Quote
A Thin Mint is a cookie (biscuit possibly, for you?). The inside is chocolate cookie with mint flavor in it, and it's coated in chocolate.

Oh, that sounds good. Different to an After Eight then. An After Eight is literally a very thin mint - a square of dark chocolate with a centre of mint fondant and they're awesome.

I wouldn't say "nasty" is offensive as a word in the sense you would not be rude for saying it publicly but its a harsh insult. So a person would be perfectly justified to be offended by the harsh insult if you called them nasty or their cooking/home nasty.

perpetua

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Re: Cool Whip, why???
« Reply #89 on: June 14, 2014, 01:27:38 PM »
Thank you for the responses, I hope I didn't offend anyone, I certainly know that everywhere has variety - especially somewhere as large as the United States.

We travelled pretty widely, and true there wasn't a lot of home cooking - but eating out from fancy restaurants to casual cafes and hot dog carts... and I did find things to be sweeter than I was used to.
It was not a criticism, just an observation.

When I was in the Uk, I also noticed that the same brands taste totally different - Cadburys for example (I prefer the UK stuff)

I kind of think I know an equivalent of a jello salad here - we kind of use it as a snack/dessert....

For those that have been to Australia - how did you find our food in comparison (apart from so much more expensive - just like everything else)

Oh - and Do they still make Girl Scout Thin Mints.... I love those things

Nah, it wasn't the "sweet" descriptor that bugged anyone. :) It was subsequent posts about "nastiness" and the like. Sometimes these Trans-Atlantic threads sort of spiral down into "America: Why do you eat such horrible gross food, and wash it down with a cup of gasoline?" and it kind of wears on the nerves after a while.  ;D And there's more diversity of food here than people sometimes realize.


Actually - it isn't that. It really isn't. I think there are cultural issues at work even in the threads. "Nasty" isn't an offensive word here and I was suprised that anyone took offense at what the PP was saying. It's just descriptive to mean "unpleasant" and it isn't rude to say you find something unpleasant, even if someone else does like it (it seems to be in America, though. This is the second time this "yucking someone's yum" issue has come up in a week. British people generally are not offended by someone saying they find something that they like unpleasant and sad to say I do find people who are to be extremely oversensitive). I totally understood what the PP was saying. She was simply saying she found something unpleasant and there really isn't anything wrong with that.

Similarly, from the opposite side of the coin, sometimes *I* feel like the transatlantic threads spiral into "Rest of the world: Why don't you like what we like? Everything here is better than what you have, and if you say you don't like it we're going to be offended by a) that opinion and b) your perfectly innocuous word choices!" and that also really wears on the nerves too - it works both ways :)

Can't we all just get along and realise that not everyone likes the same things and that's OK and nobody's being offensive by saying so? :)

Now, what's a Thin Mint? Is it like an After Eight mint? If so, they sound delicious.

Oh! That's something I didn't know about "nasty"--I guess that's some more useful trans-Atlantic knowledge. :) Nasty is pretty bad here. Not like a swear word or anything, but it's way stronger than "unpleasant" and it's like saying "That's disgusting garbage."


Oh no, it's definitely not that bad here. It just means unpleasant. Actually now you mention it I've heard 'nasty' used on US TV (admittedly on Springer and Jeremy Kyle and the like) to refer to people (usually women) of dubious character too. Like 'skanky'. Yeah. Definitely doesn't mean that here.

I think the best way forward is to assume that someone's not being rude, especially if they're obviously from a different part of the world to you (general). This is an etiquette site, after all, not populated by the sort of folks who'd generally do that.  I just see an awful lot of offence taken where none is intended (and a lot of defensiveness. It's really OK if someone else doesn't like something you like - it's not some terrible slur on your opinions!)

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A Thin Mint is a cookie (biscuit possibly, for you?). The inside is chocolate cookie with mint flavor in it, and it's coated in chocolate.

Oh, that sounds good. Different to an After Eight then. An After Eight is literally a very thin mint - a square of dark chocolate with a centre of mint fondant and they're awesome.

I wouldn't say "nasty" is offensive as a word in the sense you would not be rude for saying it publicly but its a harsh insult. So a person would be perfectly justified to be offended by the harsh insult if you called them nasty or their cooking/home nasty.

Oh, I understand that.  What I was saying was that it wasn't really a harsh insult in the context in which it was said, given that it was said by a person who isn't from a country where it *is* considered a harsh insult, and given that this is an etiquette site and nobody is deliberately setting out to offend, perhaps the benefit of the doubt might be an idea before someone takes offence.

It's like when you guys go on about 'handicapped' people. Where I'm from, it's a horrible and patronising way to refer to disabled people and I wince every time I see it, but I appreciate the cultural difference and that it isn't meant as an insult. Therefore I don't either take offence or pull you up on doing something I think is rude (which is rude in and of itself, no?)

Bit of tolerance, is all I'm saying.