Author Topic: Cool Whip, why???  (Read 6529 times)

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Margo

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Re: Cool Whip, why???
« Reply #60 on: June 06, 2014, 07:29:27 AM »
I was interested in this idea that whipped cream doesn't hold together for some reason. In general, over here in the UK we use double cream for making desserts, which is 48% fat, rather than whipping cream which is 35%. In the US whipping cream seems to start at 30% fat, and then heavy cream is 36%.  I guess double cream whips up more firmly, whereas whipping cream gives a lighter texture. I just whip it as I need it, though, so I never even thought about how long it holds up for.

We would use single cream (18%) to pour over desserts like crumble.

Huh. I never thought there might be a difference between cream across countries, but that makes sense!

That makes a lot of sense. I find with whipped cream it does hold up over time but tends to get a little harder it you keep it - presumably as it dries out  slightly. It depends how much you whip it, too, if you only lightly whip to a 'folding' consistency then I think it can get more thin and floppy if you leave it.

If I was whipping cream for something where the presentation was important, I would include a small amount of icing sugar and a dash of vanilla essence to make it a little firmer, but mostly I'd just use it as  it comes.

I know you can buy 'elmlea' which is a sort of UHT long-life cream substitute - you can buy it in different thicknesses to replace different types of real cream, but it tastes nothing like cream to me. I think it's made of buttermilk and vegetable oil, so perhaps in the same general family as cool whip? I can't stand it, and would sooner go without, but I had a friend at university who would drink it by the spoonful, given half a chance. Maybe you have to be exposed to it at an impressionable age?

(BTW, in our family we don't pour single cream on crumble. Clotted cream all the way :) Or double cream, if we have failed to get any clotted cream in.  But we do come from Devon, originally.)

I don't think I have ever had Cool Whip or Dream Topping. I don't like the whipped cream in a can you can get as it always tastes quite thin and watery to me (which is inconsistent of me, as I prefer skimmed milk to any other kind, and find full milk just tastes fatty, to me)

melbelle39

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Re: Cool Whip, why???
« Reply #61 on: June 13, 2014, 12:03:07 AM »
I have seen mention of Jello cookbooks and Jello salads - as a naive aussie (I have tried Cool Whip, spent 6 weeks in the USA on exchange, it was not to my taste) can someone please elaborate?

Is a Jello salad a dessert or does it actually form part of a salad/side - what are they made of/what do you eat with

I confess, a lot of the US foods I tried when I visited (after seeing them on TV for years) - or even just things like bread, cereal etc were far too sweet - I know that other friends/family have reported similar reactions.  I wouldn't have thought there would be too much difference between products in AUS and USA - have others noticed anything similar, or have USA visitors found that Aussie foods aren't sweet enough?

What else do you use Cool Whip with? I'm trying to think of an Australian equivalent...


jedikaiti

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Re: Cool Whip, why???
« Reply #62 on: June 13, 2014, 12:40:46 AM »
The one time a year my Mom is willing to touch Jello is at Thanksgiving when she makes a Jello salad - it's jello with celery and cranberries and I don't recall what else, and it's served as a salad. That's the only version I know of.
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Venus193

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Re: Cool Whip, why???
« Reply #63 on: June 13, 2014, 06:40:08 AM »
I have three of the Jello cookbooks and have never done any of the "salad" things.  Since Jello itself is sweet whether the original or sugar-free, I can't see how it could combine well with vegetables.

123sandy

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Re: Cool Whip, why???
« Reply #64 on: June 13, 2014, 06:54:40 AM »
I have seen mention of Jello cookbooks and Jello salads - as a naive aussie (I have tried Cool Whip, spent 6 weeks in the USA on exchange, it was not to my taste) can someone please elaborate?

Is a Jello salad a dessert or does it actually form part of a salad/side - what are they made of/what do you eat with

I confess, a lot of the US foods I tried when I visited (after seeing them on TV for years) - or even just things like bread, cereal etc were far too sweet - I know that other friends/family have reported similar reactions.  I wouldn't have thought there would be too much difference between products in AUS and USA - have others noticed anything similar, or have USA visitors found that Aussie foods aren't sweet enough?

What else do you use Cool Whip with? I'm trying to think of an Australian equivalent...

I can't eat the bread. Too sweet, nasty texture. I find a lot of their food too sweet for my taste.

menley

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Re: Cool Whip, why???
« Reply #65 on: June 13, 2014, 07:13:16 AM »
I have seen mention of Jello cookbooks and Jello salads - as a naive aussie (I have tried Cool Whip, spent 6 weeks in the USA on exchange, it was not to my taste) can someone please elaborate?

Is a Jello salad a dessert or does it actually form part of a salad/side - what are they made of/what do you eat with

I confess, a lot of the US foods I tried when I visited (after seeing them on TV for years) - or even just things like bread, cereal etc were far too sweet - I know that other friends/family have reported similar reactions.  I wouldn't have thought there would be too much difference between products in AUS and USA - have others noticed anything similar, or have USA visitors found that Aussie foods aren't sweet enough?

What else do you use Cool Whip with? I'm trying to think of an Australian equivalent...

I can't eat the bread. Too sweet, nasty texture. I find a lot of their food too sweet for my taste.

I'm an American who has been living in Europe and traveling for a couple of years. It's really interesting how different things taste - Coca-Cola for example has different levels of sweetness and carbonation in almost every country.

I was just in France for 2 weeks and found that the bottled tea there (Nestea) was the perfect level of sweetness - I came back to Hungary and their Nestea (same type) is *far* too sweet for me! So even between two EU countries there are differences. Hungarians have major sweet cravings - I think their tastes rival the Americans'.

In general, I do think American stuff is sweeter than most of the rest of the world. Having grown up there, of course, I didn't notice it, but having lived away for several years I definitely notice when I go back for visits. 

Margo

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Re: Cool Whip, why???
« Reply #66 on: June 13, 2014, 07:35:56 AM »
yes, as a Brit visiting the USA what I noticed immediately was how much sweeter a lot of food seemed to be, to what I am used to. I think the one which I found most surprising was taking a bite from a sandwich and finding that the bread was sweet. And then reading the packaging to see whether we'd inadvertently bought a Brioche style sweet loaf.

I found a lot of packaged foods to be much blander that the UK equivalents, too.

I found that savoury things were much saltier- fries in both restaurants and fast food places being particularly noticeable, particularly when I was on the verge of sending something back for being horribly salty and others at the table were tasting the same thing and then adding extra salt!

I haven't noticed it to the same degree in different European countries but that may be because I tend to try to find local products rather than familiar ones, so would not normally be comparing like-for-like.



shhh its me

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Re: Cool Whip, why???
« Reply #67 on: June 13, 2014, 08:25:48 AM »
I have seen mention of Jello cookbooks and Jello salads - as a naive aussie (I have tried Cool Whip, spent 6 weeks in the USA on exchange, it was not to my taste) can someone please elaborate?

Is a Jello salad a dessert or does it actually form part of a salad/side - what are they made of/what do you eat with

I confess, a lot of the US foods I tried when I visited (after seeing them on TV for years) - or even just things like bread, cereal etc were far too sweet - I know that other friends/family have reported similar reactions.  I wouldn't have thought there would be too much difference between products in AUS and USA - have others noticed anything similar, or have USA visitors found that Aussie foods aren't sweet enough?

What else do you use Cool Whip with? I'm trying to think of an Australian equivalent...

I've only had the dessert kinds of jello salad (adding fruit , nuts , marshmallows) and I've not seen those for years.

I can taste the sweetness difference between wonder bread type white bread and baked on site french bread. 

Katana_Geldar

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Re: Cool Whip, why???
« Reply #68 on: June 13, 2014, 08:52:20 AM »
I would say that's the high fructose corn syrup that ubiquitous over there. In Australia most things are made with cane sugar.

Yvaine

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Re: Cool Whip, why???
« Reply #69 on: June 13, 2014, 09:16:40 AM »
Is a Jello salad a dessert or does it actually form part of a salad/side - what are they made of/what do you eat with

I confess, a lot of the US foods I tried when I visited (after seeing them on TV for years) - or even just things like bread, cereal etc were far too sweet - I know that other friends/family have reported similar reactions.  I wouldn't have thought there would be too much difference between products in AUS and USA - have others noticed anything similar, or have USA visitors found that Aussie foods aren't sweet enough?

In my experience, Jello salad is Jello with various things suspended in it. It's often a dessert, like with fruit suspended in it, but back in the fifties there were a lot more savory ones. They'd use gelatin that wasn't sweetened and suspend other stuff in it, like meat and veggies. This has gone out of style to a large extent.

Some of the breads and cereals in the US are pretty sweet but there's a big variety--it's a matter of taste. I like the "grainier" breads myself and they're just as readily available, though sometimes more expensive.

miranova

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Re: Cool Whip, why???
« Reply #70 on: June 13, 2014, 10:09:11 AM »
Is a Jello salad a dessert or does it actually form part of a salad/side - what are they made of/what do you eat with

I confess, a lot of the US foods I tried when I visited (after seeing them on TV for years) - or even just things like bread, cereal etc were far too sweet - I know that other friends/family have reported similar reactions.  I wouldn't have thought there would be too much difference between products in AUS and USA - have others noticed anything similar, or have USA visitors found that Aussie foods aren't sweet enough?

In my experience, Jello salad is Jello with various things suspended in it.

Am I the only one picturing a calculator suspended in jello now?  With Dwight tattling on Jim to Michael?

Dindrane

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Re: Cool Whip, why???
« Reply #71 on: June 13, 2014, 11:01:02 AM »
I have seen mention of Jello cookbooks and Jello salads - as a naive aussie (I have tried Cool Whip, spent 6 weeks in the USA on exchange, it was not to my taste) can someone please elaborate?

Is a Jello salad a dessert or does it actually form part of a salad/side - what are they made of/what do you eat with

I confess, a lot of the US foods I tried when I visited (after seeing them on TV for years) - or even just things like bread, cereal etc were far too sweet - I know that other friends/family have reported similar reactions.  I wouldn't have thought there would be too much difference between products in AUS and USA - have others noticed anything similar, or have USA visitors found that Aussie foods aren't sweet enough?

What else do you use Cool Whip with? I'm trying to think of an Australian equivalent...

I can't eat the bread. Too sweet, nasty texture. I find a lot of their food too sweet for my taste.

I can appreciate that you don't enjoy eating bread in the United States, but I think saying it has "nasty" texture is a little bit uncalled for. Surely there are other adjectives that would describe what you dislike about it?

I would also like to point out, for the record, that the bread available in the United States is as varied as anywhere else in the world (if not more so). There's everything from national companies that sell pre-packaged bread in the grocery store to the small bakery around the corner. It's not like the US has one homogenous style of bread that is the only type available.


lowspark

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Re: Cool Whip, why???
« Reply #72 on: June 13, 2014, 11:09:10 AM »
Thank you Dindrane! I wanted to say the same thing.

This has been said before but maybe it bears repeating. Saying "xxx" in the US can always be described identically might be the same as saying "xxx" in Europe can always be described identically. Every region, state, city, neighborhood, has different people, different foods, different tastes, etc.

Yes, there are plenty of things that are the same nationally. Name brands sold nationwide, chain restaurants, etc. But those national brands aren't the only things available.

For example, the vast majority of grocery stores in my area bake their own bread and have a minimum of a dozen varieties available in addition to also offering national prepackaged brands. A few stores in particular have something like 30 different kinds of fresh baked breads for sale daily.

So no, they aren't all the same flavor, texture, size, or purpose. It's generally not a good idea to generalize.  ;)

jmarvellous

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Re: Cool Whip, why???
« Reply #73 on: June 13, 2014, 11:22:35 AM »
Just thinking of my local grocery store, there are 3 different places in the store to buy bread:
The big sandwich and breakfast bread aisle:
http://rumpydog.files.wordpress.com/2013/09/025.jpg

The specialty bread aisle, with gluten free and unusual grain options:
http://truehealthyme.files.wordpress.com/2013/06/img_0383.jpg

And the bakery section:
http://lh5.ggpht.com/_3-PWZ861xD4/S3YrQc09uUI/AAAAAAAAH1c/ZIfDpC_Cs5c/Bakery_thumb%5B1%5D.jpg

Plus, we have a specialty organic grocer with all the same types of bread plus more, a couple of specialty Russian grocers with lots of bread (emphasis on rye), a couple of American bakeries, a specialty French-Algerian bakery with bread and pastries, a Portuguese bakery or two, a Mexican bakery, bagel shops, coffee shops with in-house bakers, and small Middle Eastern markets with lots of flatbreads. All within a mile of my house. (And that doesn't even count all the restaurants or dessert cafes with their own breads!)

Yvaine

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Re: Cool Whip, why???
« Reply #74 on: June 13, 2014, 11:32:35 AM »
Thank you Dindrane! I wanted to say the same thing.

This has been said before but maybe it bears repeating. Saying "xxx" in the US can always be described identically might be the same as saying "xxx" in Europe can always be described identically. Every region, state, city, neighborhood, has different people, different foods, different tastes, etc.

Yes, there are plenty of things that are the same nationally. Name brands sold nationwide, chain restaurants, etc. But those national brands aren't the only things available.

For example, the vast majority of grocery stores in my area bake their own bread and have a minimum of a dozen varieties available in addition to also offering national prepackaged brands. A few stores in particular have something like 30 different kinds of fresh baked breads for sale daily.

So no, they aren't all the same flavor, texture, size, or purpose. It's generally not a good idea to generalize.  ;)

This. I remember a post a while back where a poster was worried that the US only had sugary, flavored yogurt. It was a sincere question and not veiled snark--she'd been on a cruise and that's all the ship had. But in our actual stores, we have more kinds of yogurt than you can even imagine. It's the same with bread and cereal. There are some items that are more common in tourist-type settings, I think, because they're cheap and keep well--like "standard" white bread--but they're not by any means the only stuff available in our actual stores.