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Author Topic: s/o of Millinery - blatant violation of a dress code  (Read 23370 times)

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violinp

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Re: s/o of Millinery - blatant violation of a dress code
« Reply #15 on: May 28, 2014, 01:19:29 PM »
they have a glitter flower and are a wedge/platform style.

This conflicts with my understanding of a flip-flop = thin, floppy sole.

If it has a wedge, it's more like sandals, and maybe that's why she thinks its reasonable.

POD. They're called flip - flops because the floppy soles make a flip - flop flip - flop sound when you walk.
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whatsanenigma

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Re: s/o of Millinery - blatant violation of a dress code
« Reply #16 on: May 28, 2014, 01:20:22 PM »

I'm several positions above her, but she doesn't report to me directly.  The manager hasn't said anything to her and it really doesn't impact me in any way shape or form. 

Is flouting a rule like this rude? Even if it really has no impact on anyone else's day to day actions?  Is it just annoying?


It might end up impacting you, though, if you have any employees who do report directly to you, who might start asking about why she is allowed to do that and they are not.  It would be maybe prudent of you to find out the specifics of this from the manager just in case you are confronted by this.

Personally I think it's really rude to violate a dress code like that. Even if you have a specific, approved, medical reason, you should keep it as discreet as possible.  Different rules for different people is a bad situation all the way around.

spookycatlady

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Re: s/o of Millinery - blatant violation of a dress code
« Reply #17 on: May 28, 2014, 01:43:24 PM »
They do make that thwipthwop sound and have the thong between the toes.  They're just fancy flip flops, in my opinion (same light rubber material as most beach shoes, but with the glitter flower and wedge), but it's interesting that others have a different definition of the shoe.  Her's kind of look like this:  http://www.kmart.com/bongo-girl-s-roper-pink-black-wedge-flip-flop-flower/p-035VA68619712P

If it helps to add context to her footwear choices: the Crocs are light grey and the socks are black.

I have to just get over myself.  My two direct reports are unlikely to raise a ruckus... However, if one of them came to me to express concern, I'd have a chat with the manager... who managed to both gracefully, professionally and hysterically address the Case of the Too Short Dress last week of one of our researchers.

newbiePA

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Re: s/o of Millinery - blatant violation of a dress code
« Reply #18 on: May 28, 2014, 01:55:53 PM »
The platform/wedge style of the shoe may be the disconnect.  I would not consider them flip flops, no matter what sound they make.  The crocs?  I got nothing ;)
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SingActDance

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Re: s/o of Millinery - blatant violation of a dress code
« Reply #19 on: May 28, 2014, 02:05:46 PM »
After seeing the picture, I'd agree those are too close to flip-flop territory for a business casual environment. I was picturing thong-style espadrilles or something.
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lowspark

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Re: s/o of Millinery - blatant violation of a dress code
« Reply #20 on: May 28, 2014, 02:09:58 PM »
The picture you linked to - I call those flip-flops, regardless of the height of the wedge. I'm guessing some people were thinking more along the lines of something like this:

http://www.dsw.com/shoe/kelly+.and.+katie+brina+wedge+sandal?prodId=297761&category=dsw11cat260004&activeCats=dsw12cat1740004,dsw12cat1970014,dsw11cat260004

Although that's essentially the same construction, it's really considered more of a sandal than something with a black rubber base.
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Outdoor Girl

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Re: s/o of Millinery - blatant violation of a dress code
« Reply #21 on: May 28, 2014, 02:42:22 PM »
...I'd have a chat with the manager... who managed to both gracefully, professionally and hysterically address the Case of the Too Short Dress last week of one of our researchers.

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Surianne

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Re: s/o of Millinery - blatant violation of a dress code
« Reply #22 on: May 28, 2014, 03:12:19 PM »
I wouldn't have thought of the linked picture as flip flops either, so I could see myself not understanding that they counted, because they look quite nice/dress to me -- but I don't know a lot about shoes!

I don't think it's really anyone's business but her supervisor's, though, even if it they were obviously a violation.  Etiquette wise, I think the only thing another employee could do if they thought it was unfair would be to ask his/her own supervisor, "Hey, I was thinking of wearing X shoe, does this fit the dress code or would it be a violation?"  But her choice in footwear isn't about anyone else.

Tea Drinker

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Re: s/o of Millinery - blatant violation of a dress code
« Reply #23 on: May 28, 2014, 03:30:52 PM »
I have worked in places where my supervisor knew that I had medical instructions never to wear shoes with heels (or to go barefoot, but office jobs don't ask that of us), because I told them. I don't consider it private that I have had plantar fasciitis and am trying to prevent a recurrence, but that's my definition of privacy. Someone else, or someone with a different medical issue but similar instructions, might not want their coworkers to know about it, and there's no reason those coworkers need to know.

That said, the timing plus the working barefoot have me thinking this is probably more "you can't make me wear X sort of shoes" than a medical issue, in this case. Still, I agree that there's no reason for OP to get involved.
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Sweet_Thang

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Re: s/o of Millinery - blatant violation of a dress code
« Reply #24 on: May 28, 2014, 09:21:01 PM »
To me, anything that not secured around the heel or ankle, and make that horrible flop flop flop noise, is a flip flop.  Whether it has a wedge heel or not. 

And we have a dress code that is often violated; however no one does anything about it.  It's entirely left up to the managers/supervisors to handle.  Problem is, the Managers/Supervisors are the biggest offenders!!!   

AnnaJ

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Re: s/o of Millinery - blatant violation of a dress code
« Reply #25 on: May 28, 2014, 11:53:50 PM »
So, I'm not saying anything to the violator, as it's not my place.

 
After the last send out, our team's admin assistant immediately started wearing flip flops to work.  And socks with Crocs.  She is otherwise always dressed appropriately.

I'm several positions above her, but she doesn't report to me directly.  The manager hasn't said anything to her and it really doesn't impact me in any way shape or form. 

Is flouting a rule like this rude? Even if it really has no impact on anyone else's day to day actions?  Is it just annoying?
 

Maybe not rude, per say, but definitely affects the morale of everyone else, and its also not fair to the rest who DO follow the policy.

I see this in my PT job. I just worked my umpteenth holiday, and noticed that none of the "new" aka hired within the last few months, folks, worked. And my friend, who also works FT never is scheduled on a holiday. Hmm. why is that?

I also get tired of some of my cws who don't do what they should be doing before they leave for the day (I close so I come in when they are ready to leave) which means we have to do extra work. Yet they're never called on it.

Those examples directly affect you - presumably you could get off some holidays if other employees worked them, and having to do other peoples' work has a direct impact on you.  Someone not meeting the dress code, not really. 

I don't think that flouting a work rule is necessarily rude if it doesn't impact other workers by changing their jobs - not adding tasks or time to their days.  It may be a poor choice for that individual, but not rude.

Cali.in.UK

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Re: s/o of Millinery - blatant violation of a dress code
« Reply #26 on: May 29, 2014, 05:44:26 AM »
Reminded me of a funny dress-code story:
I worked at an office (think a fancy version of KAPLAN) where the men had to wear suits but women had a vague 'business casual' dress code which wasn't monitored too strictly because for the most part it wasn't a problem (once I wore shoes that looked too casual and once a new manager vetoed a dress I had worn many times) but then after a year or so we hired two sisters. I think one of the other female employees wore some long, business casual shorts (the summers were very hot and humid) and the sisters must have taken this as a cue because they started purchasing shorter and shorter shorts that were getting way out of the realm of appropriate. On a casual day one of the sisters wore cut-off short-shorts and black thigh-high boots!
One day (I think very soon after the cutoffs and thigh-high boots day) the entire staff was called into a dress-code meeting and we had to go through each item and then sign in, and a new rule had been added NO SHORTS. It was pretty obvious who it was directed at, but the sisters didn't pick up on it and after the meeting I could hear them loudly complaining about how they had just bought a whole bunch of "office shorts" and now they couldn't wear them and it was so "unfair and annoying!"

DanaJ

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Re: s/o of Millinery - blatant violation of a dress code
« Reply #27 on: May 29, 2014, 10:40:02 AM »
I don't think that flouting a work rule is necessarily rude if it doesn't impact other workers by changing their jobs - not adding tasks or time to their days.  It may be a poor choice for that individual, but not rude.
I disagree. Overtly defying authority in a way that could influence other people's perceptions is rude. By deliberately contravening the rule, you may as well be announcing to all your other co-workers: "This rule is stupid, therefore the managers who came up with it are stupid. They are not worth listening to."

And you should not assume that "being out of uniform" does not impact the work of others.

Aquamarine

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Re: s/o of Millinery - blatant violation of a dress code
« Reply #28 on: May 29, 2014, 12:27:36 PM »
I would stay out of it, keep myself looking well dressed and tidy and let her continue to look like a frump.  Complaining about her wearing her get up could make you look whiney, even if it's a violation of the dress code let it go.  This other person really isn't getting away with much, her choice of footwear will limit her professionally.  I know people say "looks don't matter", well I call BS on that.  In the real professional world, looks matter a whole lot and a person wearing white socks and crocs has just closed herself off from many opportunities.  She may be getting away with breaking some dress code rule but she is doing herself no favors choosing to look like a junior high school student protesting the dress code.

Worry about yourself, concentrate on yourself and save your complaints and anger for something that is seriously important.  I just don't think this is a worthwhile battle to pick.  Remember; the better you look, the worse she looks in comparison, which is just a variation of "living well is the best revenge".
« Last Edit: May 29, 2014, 12:33:12 PM by Rosewater »
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AnnaJ

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Re: s/o of Millinery - blatant violation of a dress code
« Reply #29 on: May 29, 2014, 01:16:17 PM »
I don't think that flouting a work rule is necessarily rude if it doesn't impact other workers by changing their jobs - not adding tasks or time to their days.  It may be a poor choice for that individual, but not rude.
I disagree. Overtly defying authority in a way that could influence other people's perceptions is rude. By deliberately contravening the rule, you may as well be announcing to all your other co-workers: "This rule is stupid, therefore the managers who came up with it are stupid. They are not worth listening to."

And you should not assume that "being out of uniform" does not impact the work of others.

I disagree that defying authority is rude.  It may result in negative consequences for the one defying the rules but that is between them and their employer.  If anyone else allows themselves to be influenced either by being offended (why can she wear pajamas and I can't?) or by trying to jump on the bandwagon (she wore pajamas and didn't get reprimanded, so I'll wear them too!) then that person has a problem. 

If the employer/supervisor cares enough, they will enforce that rule; if they don't, then it's a pretty fair bet they also don't think the rule is particularly important.