Author Topic: Getting a second job  (Read 1109 times)

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Psychopoesie

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Getting a second job
« on: June 03, 2014, 03:42:03 AM »
Hi all

I've noticed that getting another job is sometimes suggested in response to financial issues. It came up on Breaking Bad too, where Walter was working at the car wash as well as teaching. It sounds like it's the norm.

This isn't something I've heard commonly suggested (I live in Oz). I'm not from a particularly wealthy or privileged background.

Some uni students I know work a couple of part-time or casual jobs to help make ends meet. I've known a few people with side-businesses, like crafts they sell at local markets. A coworker used to work at fruit and veg market at the weekend so she could afford the sports car she wanted. My mum did some casual cleaning work for a while on top of her day job for about a year to help save for something big. When I was still a bub, she took on a couple of casual jobs because she couldn't commit to full-time hours and look after me too, even with my grandma's help. A few people I know have played in bands in addition to their day job but I doubt that was for the extra money. Or they work in the family business or farm plus their salaried job elsewhere.

Some workplaces aren't too happy if you take a second job, even a small one - sometimes you have to get approval from your current bosses to do outside work. If it's seen to be affecting your performance at your primary job, they can put the kibosh on it. There can also be issues if there's a perceived conflict of interest.

Maybe it's more common in other parts of the world. So I was curious to know if that was right or if I'd gotten the wrong end of the stick. Are a lot of people doing this? Is it expected?


Mel the Redcap

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Re: Getting a second job
« Reply #1 on: June 03, 2014, 04:48:05 AM »
I agree that it's not generally a "thing" here in Australia... probably directly related to the fact that minimum wage here is actually enough to live off. My first ever full-time job was as a (slightly) glorified cleaner in a lab, paid minimum wage - minimum youth wage, if I remember right - and I still made enough to pay rent, bills, food, etc., while supporting a major book habit and even saving a little. ;D
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Margo

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Re: Getting a second job
« Reply #2 on: June 03, 2014, 04:59:09 AM »
Here (UK) it's not uncommon for people in low-paid jobs to have more than one part time job. Sometimes it is easier to find 2 part time jobs than one full time one, particularly for people who are trying to fit work around other commitments such as child care.

I would not say it is common for people in full time, salaried jobs to have a second job, but obviously if someone is in financial difficulties the options are to try to reduce expenditure and/or increase income, so it does happen.

Unless it was specifically included in the employment contract, an employer could not prevent their employee having a second job, although there are rules about the number of hours people can work.




shhh its me

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Re: Getting a second job
« Reply #3 on: June 03, 2014, 08:07:09 AM »
   I can only think of one person with 2 "jobs" thats they have a main job and do some side work about 4-8 hours a week.

When I was working in mortgages I saw a lot of people who could have benefited from a second job (people consistently earning a couple thousand dollars a year less then what they needed)

What I have seen is a lot of people take a second job to save for a house or other major expense. OR , people working on a hobbie , interest or otherwise pursue a dream.  IE weekend bands , working at a barn to offset your horses board etc.


When someone says "I earn X(per year) , I spend X+$2,000. I can not get a raise or lower expenses any further" I don't know that there is any advice other then "get a second job.(part time)"

Harriet Jones

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Re: Getting a second job
« Reply #4 on: June 03, 2014, 08:13:27 AM »
I'm sure it's more common for people with lower incomes.  For example, I've known several teachers who have also waited tables.

Miss Cathy

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Re: Getting a second job
« Reply #5 on: June 03, 2014, 09:18:10 AM »
Harriet, is teaching a particularly low paying profession? In Australia, the starting salary for a graduate is close to $60,000.

z_squared82

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Re: Getting a second job
« Reply #6 on: June 03, 2014, 09:27:48 AM »
I have contemplated getting a second job. I make a decent enough wage, but I have a lot of student loans and want to save for a house. So for me it’s less “I need to make more money to live” and more “I want to make more money now for the lifestyle changes I want.”

My sister in law is looking at getting a second job. Her primary job has become completely erratic, so she’ll looking for a new primary job, but she and my brother are also saving  up for a house. And they’ll probably need to replace her car soon. And my brother’s hours are so inconsistent (not the amount per week, but morning v. afternoon v. evening hours) that he can’t take on a second job. For them it’s less “I need a second job to stay afloat” and more “I need a second job if I’m ever going to get ahead.”

So, kind of similar reasons, but hers are much more urgent.

jmarvellous

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Re: Getting a second job
« Reply #7 on: June 03, 2014, 09:28:40 AM »
Harriet, is teaching a particularly low paying profession? In Australia, the starting salary for a graduate is close to $60,000.

I think so.

My mother is a teacher and within five years of retirement (though she's inclined to work longer because of her desire for a comfortable retirement income). She is OK working just that job, but she does tutor in the evenings and in the summer so that she's not living so close to the edge. Many of her peers do the same, or other part-time/summer work.

When she started  full-time teaching after a few years away and was the only income in a family of five, we qualified for the reduced lunch price program in our public schools because her income was so low.

When I was in school, I typically had 2 part-time jobs, and I did the same right after graduating until one job went full-time. For a few years, I've supplemented my income with freelance work, which is like a second job (or my only job, now that I'm in school again).

There's a varying threshold above which people are comfortable, but below that, it's reasonably common to find additional work until you earn enough to make ends meet. I would not speculate about percentages or numbers of jobs, though!

I'll just say that if I find out a person is making minimum wage at one job, I'm never surprised to find out they're working a second gig, too.

Psychopoesie

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Re: Getting a second job
« Reply #8 on: June 03, 2014, 09:40:17 AM »
Harriet, is teaching a particularly low paying profession? In Australia, the starting salary for a graduate is close to $60,000.

Exactly what I was wondering. My mum was a teacher so I grew up with lots of teachers in our social circle. The wage wasn't low. A second job wasn't usually part of the deal.

Btw minimum wage here is about $16ph (roughly $622pw or about $32000pa) if it helps to know.

RubyCat

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Re: Getting a second job
« Reply #9 on: June 03, 2014, 09:51:12 AM »
I think the teacher salaries vary from region to region and also vary greatly by what city or town you work in. A friend's brother works in Boston and she says he makes over $100,000. He has advanced degrees but that's a lotta money.

I woke as a nurse and it's not uncommon to have a per diem job on the side. I'm "only" working one job right now but have worked more than one in the past. There are many reasons. I like not having all my eggs in one basket. I like learning and seeing how other places do things. I like being exposed to different types of work. My facility is one of the lowest paid in the area. I like my coworkers and my schedule so I stay, but if I want to feel like I'm not just getting by, I need something on the side.

Harriet Jones

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Re: Getting a second job
« Reply #10 on: June 03, 2014, 10:18:47 AM »
Teacher salaries aren't particularly high.  I found a document from a couple of years ago that has starting salary at $40,000 in my area.  If you have an advanced degree or certain certifications, it would be higher.  Unfortunately, the cost of living in our area is also pretty high and even $60K isn't a particularly high wage.

DaisyG

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Re: Getting a second job
« Reply #11 on: June 03, 2014, 11:58:45 AM »
I have done some tutoring and sewing on the side but found it too much as I have just over an hour's commute each way to work. I didn't let my employer know about this but would have to if I had a 'proper' employed 2nd job.

My husband's hours were drastically cut at his job a few months ago so he also now has a 2nd job. I think with low-paid jobs its now quite hard to get a full-time post in the UK so more and more people have to get 2 part-time jobs.

My mum used to teach full time but is now part time so she has private classes which could count as a 2nd job. Her colleagues, some part time, some full time, also have private classes on the side. I work with some social workers and mental health professionals and it's not unusual for them to do some consulting or forensic work on the side which not only helps financially but can also help build their reputation.

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Getting a second job
« Reply #12 on: June 03, 2014, 12:04:15 PM »
I know a few people with a 9 to 5, M to F job who pick up either a weekend job or odd jobs to make ends meet or to save for something special.  I considered it myself but because I was picky on what I wanted to do, I didn't end up getting the second job.  I have very few weekend committments with my current job and they are generally scheduled well in advance so it wouldn't be an issue to have a weekend job on top of my main one.
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Library Dragon

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Re: Getting a second job
« Reply #13 on: June 03, 2014, 12:17:55 PM »
I had a second job when I was single and wanted to earn enough to pay my car insurance.  I had a friend who was a police officer in Germany.  He had a second job at a sports club as the bartender.  He did it to pay off bills from his divorce. 

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shhh its me

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Re: Getting a second job
« Reply #14 on: June 03, 2014, 12:34:06 PM »
Harriet, is teaching a particularly low paying profession? In Australia, the starting salary for a graduate is close to $60,000.

I think so.

My mother is a teacher and within five years of retirement (though she's inclined to work longer because of her desire for a comfortable retirement income). She is OK working just that job, but she does tutor in the evenings and in the summer so that she's not living so close to the edge. Many of her peers do the same, or other part-time/summer work.

When she started  full-time teaching after a few years away and was the only income in a family of five, we qualified for the reduced lunch price program in our public schools because her income was so low.

When I was in school, I typically had 2 part-time jobs, and I did the same right after graduating until one job went full-time. For a few years, I've supplemented my income with freelance work, which is like a second job (or my only job, now that I'm in school again).

There's a varying threshold above which people are comfortable, but below that, it's reasonably common to find additional work until you earn enough to make ends meet. I would not speculate about percentages or numbers of jobs, though!

I'll just say that if I find out a person is making minimum wage at one job, I'm never surprised to find out they're working a second gig, too.

A teachers starting salary is very low when compared with their education but I think its a "living wage".  *before you factor in supplies and hours. Which will vary by teacher , district and subject* 

For comparison using a 40 hour week and 50 week year.
A good house painter, well paid factory worker , some office staff (more advanced then a receptionist ) , very well paid CS, maybe an LPN would make about the same as a first year teacher in this area.

Anyone in IT , a specialized factory worker ,  an electrification , RN ,dental hygienist, some specialized office work ,  would make more.