Author Topic: Things you love from other countries...  (Read 6115 times)

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Venus193

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Re: Things you love from other countries...
« Reply #45 on: July 01, 2014, 09:46:52 AM »
Salt and vinegar potato chips from Britain.  US companies can't get that flavor to work.

Nikko-chan

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Re: Things you love from other countries...
« Reply #46 on: July 01, 2014, 10:05:59 AM »
not so much food but a thing and i can make it right here at home. Bento. Oh my lord. many different foods and just a few bites of each one? Heck yes!

mime

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Re: Things you love from other countries...
« Reply #47 on: July 01, 2014, 01:47:44 PM »
With the internet, some things are getting so much easier to get my hands on, but sometimes they still cost a lot---

Lingonberry preserves, or lingonberry anything, really.

Chocolate: Slitti (Italy), Pralus (France).

And I agree with Nikk-chan on Bento. A friend of mine who lived in Japan for many years introduced me to the concept. She also explained the idea that a satisfying meal had to have at least 13 elements, and her lunches did even though they were so compact. It's something I try to achieve now, but don't usually get there!

Julia Mercer

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Re: Things you love from other countries...
« Reply #48 on: July 01, 2014, 03:20:27 PM »
Orkney Fudge from Scotland, just melts in your mouth, used to get it all the time when mom and dad and I used to visit family there

StarDrifter

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Re: Things you love from other countries...
« Reply #49 on: July 11, 2014, 02:34:21 AM »
mmmm I made the mistake of getting meatballs with mashed potato and that creamy delicious sauce from IKEA the first time we went there.
Now, every time we go to IKEA I make sure to get at least ten or fifteen packets of the gravy, as well as a few bags of the meatballs. It's two hours to the nearest one.
Thankfully, getting ahold of American candy is much easier than it used to be - there's a specialty store here in my town that stocks things like Dr Pepper, Milk Duds and various flavours of Pop Tarts - not stuff available in the supermarket normally.

I got onto IrnBru when I visited the UK and that was a silly thing, because it tastes just that bit different to anything else that there is NO substitute. However, again - I found it at the supermarket the other day.

I have a reciprocal agreement, though, with some friends in the US - they send me US iTunes store gift cards, I send them Caramello Koalas, Tim Tams and salt and vinegar chips.
... it might frighten them.
Victoria,

jmarvellous

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Re: Things you love from other countries...
« Reply #50 on: July 11, 2014, 09:28:44 AM »
French cheeses. I cannot buy them, but I love them. When I buy cheese, I eat nothing but cheese, crackers/bread and fruit until the cheese is gone.

I'll join the Ikea love. We currently have 2 matching desks, chairs, bookcases and storage from Ikea; my first room away from home was 100% furnished by Ikea thanks to some gift cards, and I loved it. I will pass on all the food but the lingonberry soda, though.

I know it's an American store, but it's basically 100% imports -- I love to browse the international products/foods at Cost Plus/World Market. Give me some pickledy things from Italy and crispbreads from Northern Europe, and soaps from somewhere like France, and I'm a happy lady.

VorFemme

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Re: Things you love from other countries...
« Reply #51 on: July 11, 2014, 12:42:10 PM »
Rooibos (red bush) tea from South Africa - I fell in love with it when a resort used it as the tea that they left in the room with a small amount of coffee for guests to use for their first cup...it was not easily found in stores, so I would treasure the tea bags when we stayed there...

VorGuy tasted some when I found some on sale for about 60% off at a store that specializes in clearing out other stores' stock.  It was still expensive enough that it was a "treat" rather than our everyday beverage.

He liked it, so I found some loose tea at a farmer's market...and then when that spice jar full was half empty in less than two weeks, went looking online for more, a lot more.

Apparently it only grows well in South Africa, but it grows everywhere there...and it is good!

Excuse me, I need to refill my glass...
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SamiHami

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Re: Things you love from other countries...
« Reply #52 on: July 11, 2014, 12:53:12 PM »
Jaffa cakes...my English coworker has given me some in the past and they are sooo delicious!

My other one, sadly, I think has been discontinued; Caramilk Dark (got it in Canada).

What have you got? Is it food? Is it for me? I want it whatever it is!

Bobbie

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Re: Things you love from other countries...
« Reply #53 on: July 11, 2014, 01:09:36 PM »
not so much food but a thing and i can make it right here at home. Bento. Oh my lord. many different foods and just a few bites of each one? Heck yes!

I love Bento.  When I visit Hawaii I go to Shirokiya and eat.  I love Matsumoto Shave Ice on the North shore of Hawaii.  My parents love on the hill above it and its a must stop for lychee shave ice no beans.

I love World Cost Plus Market, I get my Japanese candy, choco mushrooms, there.  A must stop in Seattle is Uwajimayas (Asian grocery store) I stock up while the family watches the Seattle Mariners, baseball, the stadium is right next door.  I also go to the Southcenter Mall in Renton to get my Japanese bamboo ear cleaners, longs wash clothes, and back scratchers.

I really miss the restaurants in Japan.  I miss corn soup, katsu, okonomiyaki, sukiyaki, cold soba, and donburi.

jmarvellous

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Re: Things you love from other countries...
« Reply #54 on: July 11, 2014, 01:44:07 PM »
Rooibos (red bush) tea from South Africa - I fell in love with it when a resort used it as the tea that they left in the room with a small amount of coffee for guests to use for their first cup...it was not easily found in stores, so I would treasure the tea bags when we stayed there...

VorGuy tasted some when I found some on sale for about 60% off at a store that specializes in clearing out other stores' stock.  It was still expensive enough that it was a "treat" rather than our everyday beverage.

He liked it, so I found some loose tea at a farmer's market...and then when that spice jar full was half empty in less than two weeks, went looking online for more, a lot more.

Apparently it only grows well in South Africa, but it grows everywhere there...and it is good!

Excuse me, I need to refill my glass...

I haven't been to a grocery store in the last 3-5 years that didn't sell some type of rooibos. I don't recall it being significantly more expensive than other types of tea, either (well, more expensive than the 40-pack of Lipton). Have you tried a grocery store?


I do love tea, and I suppose it's an imported good in most places!

magicdomino

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Re: Things you love from other countries...
« Reply #55 on: July 11, 2014, 04:12:25 PM »
Celestial Seasonings has roobois tea bags; smaller companies are getting into it as well, but aren't as widely distributed.  I still get my supply from online sellers, because I prefer loose teas at home.  Roobois is probably available from brick-and-mortar specialty shops as well, but then I'd have to drive there.   ;)

VorFemme

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Re: Things you love from other countries...
« Reply #56 on: July 11, 2014, 07:04:39 PM »
I checked the price at Teavanna for rooibos ($5 for 3.5 oz. instead of $7 for 16 ounces - so more than four times as much tea for 40% increase in cost) and the price for various companies that sell it in tea bags (also broken down to see how many ounces I'm getting for the money.  The loose tea lets me adjust the strength to suit our tastes more easily than tea bags do and was much cheaper.  VorGuy is an accountant and a bit of a cheapskate - he was happier to get enough tea that he won't run out for a good price (even though I had to find an airtight metal tea canister for storing it - Goodwill).

I found out that a very clean coffee maker (no traces of coffee smell) makes a pretty good substitute for a tea maker - based on what a tea place in Georgia was using to make their specialty tea.  The tea doesn't over steep (and end up "stewed") with a bitter under taste to it (not a problem with rooibos - but a few others in the collection do get an off flavor if they steep too long).

I just have to stay by the coffee maker to take the carafe off the heat & turn the thing off.  And clean it between using it for tea and using it for coffee.  Or use my Hamilton Beach iced tea maker that turns itself off after dispensing the tea into a glass that won't crack if it has ice in it and hot tea drips into it (works very well).
« Last Edit: July 11, 2014, 07:08:23 PM by VorFemme »
Let sleeping dragons be.......morning breath......need I say more?

Library Dragon

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Re: Things you love from other countries...
« Reply #57 on: July 11, 2014, 07:20:52 PM »
It's a very long list.

Italy: fresh Pecorino cheese, gelato and those small, flat peaches from Sicily
France: all those lovely Normandy cheeses (Camembert, Pont-L'Evêque and Livarot), baguette and crepes
Germany: a poppyseed pastry I never seen anywhere else, wine (we were told the best wines were never exported) and a pear schapps we had frequently at a bar/restaurant near where we stayed in Hamburg (the owner made it himself and gave it away because he wasn't allowed to sell it)
England: ginger beer

Italian peaches! We have very good local peaches, but these flat peaches are so delicious.

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alkira6

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Re: Things you love from other countries...
« Reply #58 on: July 11, 2014, 07:21:36 PM »
I miss Irish and Welsh cheese - always so fresh and sharp.  I also miss getting up and walking to the market in Swansea and getting fresh pasties and Welsh cakes and snacking on cockles with vinegar.

Good scones and thick shred marmalade.  I have found ginger beer here lately.  Our local Kroger will order it, give me a call, and I'll buy the entire order of Fever Tree ginger beer.  They also have golden syrup so that I can make flapjacks when I have a craving for them.

A Tesco brand cheese cracker that was absolutely delicious.  It was extremely thin and in a waffle pattern.  I haven't had those in years.

ETA: Teavanna has lost all custom from me. There were one too many times that I bought some delicious tea from them after sampling and when I made it at home it was a pale imitation of what the sample tasted like.  The sales associates told me that I was making it wrong, and come to find out they were using 4-6 times the amount of tea to make the samples.  Doubly deceptive since one of their selling points is how inexpensive each cup of tea is if made according to the directions, but if you do this then it tastes like faintly flavored water instead of the rich robist cup you had when sampling.
« Last Edit: July 11, 2014, 07:27:48 PM by alkira6 »

VorFemme

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Re: Things you love from other countries...
« Reply #59 on: July 11, 2014, 09:20:38 PM »
I am getting good flavor with 1/3 the amount of the loose rooibos that I found (fresher tea, I think, so more flavor) in the Hamilton Beach iced tea maker (both the tea and the small appliance were bought off eBay - but Wal*Mart is supposed to have the tea maker or you can buy an inexpensive Mr. Coffee or Mr. Tea and just pour the results into a pitcher to chill, I'm sure - it's what I'm doing in the resort mini-kitchen).

I also have a Black & Decker coffee maker that makes up to 15 oz. of tea, coffee, or hot water into a travel mug (which comes with it and coincidentally holds 15 oz.) - it works very well & has a built in filter, no paper filters needed.  I have been steeping the tea in the hot water, instead of using it in the filter.  Since I didn't bring it with us on vacation - I'll have to try it once I get home.

I have an espresso machine, a 12 cup coffee maker, a 4 cup Mr. Coffee, the Black & Decker coffee maker, the Hamilton Beach iced tea maker, and a French Press (never used) - it may go to a fund raising garage sale the next time VorGuy's students set one up...and I almost forgot the clear glass tea pot with glass infuser (intended for blooming teas) that does NOT work with loose tea - the infuser slots are too large & I have to filter the tea.

Um - I may have been trying too hard to find the "perfect" tea and coffee makers...may need to post getting rid of a couple of these to the decluttering thread!  I can't get rid of the 4 & 12 cup coffee makers as long as VorGuy is teaching school, as they get taken on field trips to make large batches of tea or hot chocolate (or even coffee - depending on what is wanted by various students & chaperoning parents).

« Last Edit: July 11, 2014, 09:34:28 PM by VorFemme »
Let sleeping dragons be.......morning breath......need I say more?