General Etiquette > All In A Day's Work

It's not my job!

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Coley:
I'm for starting by letting Adam know that he can fix these errors in the moment. It gives him the benefit of the doubt. With the wording PPs have suggested, this doesn't have to be done aggressively, but it can let him know that he is empowered to make the correction. If he refuses to do it, then you may have a better understanding of the problem. I agree with TootsNYC about listening to Adam to find out his take on the situation. This clarifies the problem not just from your perspective but his as well.

If you determine that Adam's mindset is, "It's not my error; it's yours. You need to correct it," then you can let him know that office culture supports everyone correcting each other's mistakes: You do it for Eric; Eric does it for you; and you and Eric do it for Adam. There's no territoriality, and no one's keeping score about errors. Errors happen, and everyone shares the responsibility to correct them. You might make a mental note of the incident that just occurred in which he insisted you should correct your error, and you found one of his and corrected it as well -- in the spirit of providing good service to the student. This would be a good example to share with Adam.

If Adam continued to refuse to help with correcting these errors after that, I'd probably seek guidance from a supervisor who can clarify the expectations for everyone involved.

shadowfox79:
Thanks to everyone for all these suggestions.

Coley, your suggestion about getting guidance from a supervisor is a good one. Our manager has always made it clear that we are a team and are expected to assist each other during busy periods, but this is also something Adam doesn't do - Eric and I assist each other all the time but Adam's response on being asked for help is generally along the lines of "That's not my responsibility." As another example, I was covering a board two weeks ago at which he was scheduled to be my assistant, but when I had to take a day off mid-preparation to take my mother to hospital, it was Eric who helped out with the prep because Adam interpreted his role as "turn up and work the PowerPoints" and nothing else. I didn't feel I could say much since it was technically my issue to solve, but it ticked me off - actually, this might be why I'm starting to notice it more. I would always be willing to step in and help someone else in that position, but I suppose in reality Adam has the right to refuse.

I'll think about raising it with my manager.

mime:
My first in-career job was at a company where several people had posted signs on their cubicle walls saying "NMP" (for "Not My Problem".

I had encountered some exhibits that didn't reconcile, but those who created the exhibits didn't think it was worth their time to correct them... before they were sent to our regulators in New York. I eventually got things substantially repaired, and learned the value of a "statement of reliance" (standard practice in my profession). Clear communication with my boss was crucial in all of this.

When a handful of those "NMP" people were laid off, I bought a cupcake at lunch time to have my own quiet little celebration. When my company was bought out by a larger company because it was struggling with regulatory issues, I wasn't surprised.

I'm happy to work in a much better environment now.

OP, I hope that Adam either grows out of his attitude or the difference in value between an Eric and an Adam are noticed by your leaders.


Coley:

--- Quote from: shadowfox79 on July 03, 2014, 01:18:48 PM ---Thanks to everyone for all these suggestions.

Coley, your suggestion about getting guidance from a supervisor is a good one. Our manager has always made it clear that we are a team and are expected to assist each other during busy periods, but this is also something Adam doesn't do - Eric and I assist each other all the time but Adam's response on being asked for help is generally along the lines of "That's not my responsibility." As another example, I was covering a board two weeks ago at which he was scheduled to be my assistant, but when I had to take a day off mid-preparation to take my mother to hospital, it was Eric who helped out with the prep because Adam interpreted his role as "turn up and work the PowerPoints" and nothing else. I didn't feel I could say much since it was technically my issue to solve, but it ticked me off - actually, this might be why I'm starting to notice it more. I would always be willing to step in and help someone else in that position, but I suppose in reality Adam has the right to refuse.

I'll think about raising it with my manager.

--- End quote ---

To borrow from mime's post, the more I hear about Adam, the more I get the impression that he is NATP: Not A Team Player. It sounds like Adam may have a narrower interpretation of his responsibilities than you and Eric do. If his job is X, Y, Z, and your job is A, B, C, then he isn't going to pitch in with C because it's not his problem. However, that's not the office culture, and it doesn't reflect your manager's expectations.

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