General Etiquette > All In A Day's Work

It's not my job!

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camlan:
I would start at least letting Adam know he's made a mistake. If you and Eric are just fixing his mistakes without telling him (and I get it, that's exactly what I'd do--fix the mistake and get on with the work), then Adam thinks he makes no mistakes and you and Eric do. He may even see telling you about your mistakes as "helping" you to do your job better.

So I'd tell him quickly, "Say, Adam, there's an X here on J. Smith's record when there should be a Y, I'll go ahead and change that, okay?" He needs to know that you and Eric are not the only ones making mistakes.

And I like SpookyCatLady's wording for when he asks you to correct one of your mistakes. If he's in a hurry, he now knows he can fix things. And if he's not, he can wait for you.

It could be possible that he just doesn't realize that the office standard is to fix whatever you can as quickly as you can.

BarensMom:
In every job description ever written, there is almost always the phrase, "other duties as assigned," or something along those lines.  If you have any authority over Adam, I would refer him to that phrase. 

Yvaine:

--- Quote from: BarensMom on July 02, 2014, 10:30:02 AM ---In every job description ever written, there is almost always the phrase, "other duties as assigned," or something along those lines.  If you have any authority over Adam, I would refer him to that phrase.

--- End quote ---

I know it's annoying when people pull the "that's not my job" thing over petty stuff, but this doesn't sound like the same kind of situation to me; it sounds like he doesn't feel authorized to change another admin's student records, which makes total sense to me. And I think they're all equals.

Lynn2000:
In the example as given, I can see how Adam might not have wanted to correct someone else's mistake. I think it would have been fine if you said, "I'm kind of busy right now, feel free to fix it yourself." And then in the future, when you find a mistake of his, at least mention it to him before you fix it.

I have seen both sides of this. In my office everyone has specific things assigned to them, but there's always miscellaneous stuff not assigned to anyone that still needs to get done. I had one co-worker, Mike, who would not lift a finger to do anything that wasn't specifically part of his own project. He even balked when the boss handed him brief assignments like training someone else. It just felt very ungenerous, like he was better than we were. And it certainly didn't endear him to anyone else.

On the other hand, we have some part-time interns to take care of basic things around the office. If I see something that's part of their job, that they haven't done, I will not take care of it unless it directly affects me. Because if other people do their job for them, they won't learn how to do their jobs. For example if the plasticware cups are empty (specifically one of their jobs to fill) I will get the box down and take out one spoon just for me, and leave the empty cup. If they're around I try to mention the undone duty to them also, but I won't do it for them unless there's an immediate need.

bopper:
Don't worry, usually managers notice who goes above and beyond and who doesn't.

"I will get right to that when I finish the TPS report or you can change it now. Thanks for letting me know."

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