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Author Topic: How to bring this to the boss  (Read 3871 times)

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rashea

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How to bring this to the boss
« on: July 31, 2014, 11:35:35 AM »
I'm going to try to keep this short and not release much info, so ask if you have questions.

I work in mental health. One of my co-workers has been having issues with his own mental health recently. He's out for a while. In meeting the other day two co-workers were bad mouthing him for his disability and for needing to take time off and for not pulling his weight. It left me feeling very angry on his behalf (note, I ham a friend of his) and concerned for myself since when winter comes my knee will probably flare up and I will likely have days when I don't pull my weight.

I'm debating having this conversation with my boss, but I'm not really sure how to start. I am aware I'm looking for magic words, but I thought it worth throwing out there.
"Manners change, principles don't. It's about treating people with consideration, respect and honesty." Peter Post

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DanaJ

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Re: How to bring this to the boss
« Reply #1 on: July 31, 2014, 12:33:54 PM »
"Good accommodation plans and return-to-work programs foster a healthy and productive workforce. We have an excellent programs for short- and long-term disability, and accommodation plans that help our workers return to full productivity. However, there seems to be a morale issue: many co-workers are making derogatory remarks about their peers who are away or returning from disability leave/accommodation.

That unfairly stigmatizes recovering workers and may impede progress made towards a return to full duties. It may also have the effect of creating an unpleasant work environment that may affect employee performance in general."

Then go into the types of trash talk you witness as an example and ask if there is a way to put an end to it, since everyone benefits from a healthier, supportive workplace. It may go over better if you make a good business case for promoting a friendlire atmosphere, rather than being outraged that they are trash talking.

Focus on the positive and what positive outcomes could come about.

Bast

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Re: How to bring this to the boss
« Reply #2 on: July 31, 2014, 01:05:49 PM »
I'd suggest going off of what DanaJ says, but a touch less formal.

"<boss>, I'm concerned about a conversation that I heard the other day during our meeting.  People were saying things about <co-worker> and how he's sick and not pulling his weight.  My biggest worry is that this is going to affect how we all work together in the future, since I know how quickly rumors can get around.  I'm worried that the attitudes that some of my coworkers are showing are going to affect how we, as a team, work and how that will affect patient care.  I'd like your advice for the situation."

Mental health care - and yes, I have worked in it - requires an amazing amount of teamwork.  I'd focus on that and how it could affect patient care.
"They may forget your name but they will never forget how you made them feel." ~Maya Angelou

Lynn2000

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Re: How to bring this to the boss
« Reply #3 on: July 31, 2014, 01:22:53 PM »
If I were the boss of a mental health care facility, I would definitely want to know that two of my employees were denigrating a co-worker who was dealing with a mental health issue. To me that indicates a major disconnect from the attitude they ought to be taking with clients.
~Lynn2000

rashea

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Re: How to bring this to the boss
« Reply #4 on: July 31, 2014, 02:02:38 PM »
Thanks all. I asked for a few minutes, and let him know that I had been made uncomfortable by comments and he knew what I was talking about. I was able to add to his knowledge of what was said, and it left me feeling a bit better. At least he's aware and watching.
"Manners change, principles don't. It's about treating people with consideration, respect and honesty." Peter Post

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veronaz

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Re: How to bring this to the boss
« Reply #5 on: July 31, 2014, 02:26:26 PM »
OP Ė I understand your feelings regarding the insensitivity of your co-workers.

What I donít understand is why you didnít speak up at the time the remarks were made.

If I was the boss, I would ask that Ė i.e. ďAnd what did you say to them?Ē

I also donít see your possible future knee flare-ups as being an issue, anymore than someone possibly having to be out with the flu or dental surgery or whatever..

rashea

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Re: How to bring this to the boss
« Reply #6 on: July 31, 2014, 02:45:24 PM »
OP Ė I understand your feelings regarding the insensitivity of your co-workers.

What I donít understand is why you didnít speak up at the time the remarks were made.

If I was the boss, I would ask that Ė i.e. ďAnd what did you say to them?Ē

I also donít see your possible future knee flare-ups as being an issue, anymore than someone possibly having to be out with the flu or dental surgery or whatever..

Some of it is that I didn't want to interrupt the meeting, and they were talking between them. And some of it is that it's an open secret why he's out.

And I guess I don't see his flare up as being different than mine. For that matter, one of the gossips has been out a lot more than this recently.
"Manners change, principles don't. It's about treating people with consideration, respect and honesty." Peter Post

Vermont