General Etiquette > Family and Children

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Gone:
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Drunken Housewife:
I think that it depends upon her personality.  Since we don't know her, it's hard to guess whether she's the type who wants to feel included and be invited, even if she can't go, or if she would feel like it was a gift grab and insensitive given her situation.

One of my husband's half brothers got really offended that we sent him a wedding invitation, and he was able bodied but doesn't fly (I don't know why; it may or may not involve a fear of flying).  Evidently it was quite rude of us to invite a person who lives a few time zones away to our wedding when they don't fly  ::) 

I can see this going either way, being offensive not sending it or being offensive sending it.  Someone who actually knows her would be better able to guess which way to go.

AuntyEm:
Yes, if she is not desperately ill at this time (not conscious, in the hospital, etc. ), then I think you should send her an invitation.  She is always free to decline but if you don't even invite her, she doen't get a choice. 

GreenBird:
Any chance she could "attend" part of the shower via Facetime or Skype?  If so, your invitation could give that option or mention the idea to her.  It could be a fun way to include her in the festivities without her having to travel.

MrTango:
I'd send it, and then give her a phone call before it gets to her house.  Let her know that you know her health will make it difficult for her to attend, but if she's feeling up to it, she's very welcome.

POD to GreenBird.  I've heard of that being done among LadyTango's friends, and it always seems that the person who can't physically make it to the event really appreciates the effort to include them.

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