Author Topic: How to Respond to These Customers?  (Read 8284 times)

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violinp

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Re: How to Respond to These Customers?
« Reply #15 on: August 11, 2014, 08:27:05 PM »
For the third scenario, while I agree you don't have to see every movie, I think you should have a basic knowledge of all the movies showing. I do box office work myself, and while I don't see every company/piece we present, everyone who works in the box office is expected to be able to speak to the general tone/content and guide patrons to shows they'd be interested in. It's good for business, and it's good customer service.

I do know, and make it my business to know about the content. It's that they say, "Have you seen this movie yet?" as if I will see it eventually because it's there to be watched. It does make me giggle when they ask that of a movie that's only been out two days, though - as if I would want to brave opening night crowds when I work there to see a movie just because it's new and shiny (plus we're not allowed to, per employee policy, but I don't feel as if going into the employee code of conduct is beneficial for our interaction).

Maybe I'm missing the tone, but I don't think asking the person from whom you are buying the tickets if they have seen the movie is all that weird. Is it the addition of "yet" to the end that bugs you? Or do they act shocked when you say that you haven't? I'm just trying to understand where your frustration is coming from.   Unless the person is being rude or pushy, I think your best bet is just to respond "Nope! Not yet.  But I've heard it's good" or something equally noncommittal.

It's the "yet" that's bugging me - as if I have nothing better to do with my time and want to spend all my time at my job, plus it's assuming I'd actually want to see that particular movie, or that it wouldn't trigger horrible memories for me (Into the Storm, because I've experienced tornadoes in real life). There's loads of movies out right now, but I don't necessarily want to see all of them, and getting into why could potentially be awkward - "What do you mean, you don't like that actor? He's the greatest actor of all time!" "I can't believe you don't like that genre!"
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ChiGirl

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Re: How to Respond to These Customers?
« Reply #16 on: August 11, 2014, 09:10:25 PM »
I think you need to embrace your inner humorless female-dog. There's no rule that says you have to be super cheery and jovial with these people. I would not smile (because that encourages people) and just be really dead-pan/borderline bored looking.

Actually....at the movie theater I worked at (worst! job! ever!), there was, in fact, a rule that you had to be smiley/friendly to customers.  So you could either cultivate a polite smile, or maybe a super-cheery fake persona.  Either can be discarded the moment the theater doors close.  But in my experience, there is no way to keep a job at a movie theater without playing along with the customers' stupid jokes or answering the same question over and over and over again.

I feel for you, OP.  I once got called into the manager's office because a customer complained that I had thrown a soda cup at them.  Complete lie. 


MrsJWine

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Re: How to Respond to These Customers?
« Reply #17 on: August 11, 2014, 10:25:40 PM »
It's the "yet" that's bugging me - as if I have nothing better to do with my time and want to spend all my time at my job, plus it's assuming I'd actually want to see that particular movie, or that it wouldn't trigger horrible memories for me (Into the Storm, because I've experienced tornadoes in real life). There's loads of movies out right now, but I don't necessarily want to see all of them, and getting into why could potentially be awkward - "What do you mean, you don't like that actor? He's the greatest actor of all time!" "I can't believe you don't like that genre!"

I think you're really overthinking this. They probably have nothing of the sort going on in their minds. You're going to exhaust yourself reading nefarious implications into everything people say. They're probably thinking, "If I had a job at a movie theater, I would see EVERY movie, I wonder if she's seen this one yet?" or, "I am so excited about this one. Everyone is so excited about this one. Hey, I should ask this person who works here." It's not personal. I mean this in the nicest way possible (because I have to say it to myself all the time): No one is thinking about you that much. That much in-depth contemplation about the lives of strangers just doesn't happen most of the time.

I don't think they are trying to be annoying, I think they are trying to engage. I asked a friend once who worked in the service industry how they could handle the monotony of the same question over and over many times a day, every day. He said, "For me, it's the millionth time, for them it's the first time. I have to treat each one like the first one."

This is so true. I waited tables for a long time. If there's a tired old joke to be made involving a restaurant or restaurant work, I've heard it. You just smile and nod.

I guarantee you've thoughtlessly done the same to a retail worker, or a waiter, or some other service worker. I know I have. It's not because we're mean and evil. Some things are funny the first time you think of them, and you want to share them with a person you think will appreciate it. Assume that of the people who tell you the same old joke for the billionth time. Or, again, you're just going to wear yourself out over nothing.


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Utah

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Re: How to Respond to These Customers?
« Reply #18 on: August 11, 2014, 11:30:32 PM »
Pod to MrsJWine. My mom always told me that no one is thinking about me as much as I'm thinking about me. What they /are/ all doing is thinking about themselves as much as I'm thinking about myself.

lollylegs

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Re: How to Respond to These Customers?
« Reply #19 on: August 11, 2014, 11:41:35 PM »
For the third scenario, while I agree you don't have to see every movie, I think you should have a basic knowledge of all the movies showing. I do box office work myself, and while I don't see every company/piece we present, everyone who works in the box office is expected to be able to speak to the general tone/content and guide patrons to shows they'd be interested in. It's good for business, and it's good customer service.

I do know, and make it my business to know about the content. It's that they say, "Have you seen this movie yet?" as if I will see it eventually because it's there to be watched. It does make me giggle when they ask that of a movie that's only been out two days, though - as if I would want to brave opening night crowds when I work there to see a movie just because it's new and shiny (plus we're not allowed to, per employee policy, but I don't feel as if going into the employee code of conduct is beneficial for our interaction).

Maybe I'm missing the tone, but I don't think asking the person from whom you are buying the tickets if they have seen the movie is all that weird. Is it the addition of "yet" to the end that bugs you? Or do they act shocked when you say that you haven't? I'm just trying to understand where your frustration is coming from.   Unless the person is being rude or pushy, I think your best bet is just to respond "Nope! Not yet.  But I've heard it's good" or something equally noncommittal.

It's the "yet" that's bugging me - as if I have nothing better to do with my time and want to spend all my time at my job, plus it's assuming I'd actually want to see that particular movie, or that it wouldn't trigger horrible memories for me (Into the Storm, because I've experienced tornadoes in real life). There's loads of movies out right now, but I don't necessarily want to see all of them, and getting into why could potentially be awkward - "What do you mean, you don't like that actor? He's the greatest actor of all time!" "I can't believe you don't like that genre!"

How would a customer even know something like this?

Pod to MrsJWine, I think you're overthinking that one.

Eeep!

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Re: How to Respond to These Customers?
« Reply #20 on: August 12, 2014, 12:01:10 AM »
For the third scenario, while I agree you don't have to see every movie, I think you should have a basic knowledge of all the movies showing. I do box office work myself, and while I don't see every company/piece we present, everyone who works in the box office is expected to be able to speak to the general tone/content and guide patrons to shows they'd be interested in. It's good for business, and it's good customer service.


I do know, and make it my business to know about the content. It's that they say, "Have you seen this movie yet?" as if I will see it eventually because it's there to be watched. It does make me giggle when they ask that of a movie that's only been out two days, though - as if I would want to brave opening night crowds when I work there to see a movie just because it's new and shiny (plus we're not allowed to, per employee policy, but I don't feel as if going into the employee code of conduct is beneficial for our interaction).

Maybe I'm missing the tone, but I don't think asking the person from whom you are buying the tickets if they have seen the movie is all that weird. Is it the addition of "yet" to the end that bugs you? Or do they act shocked when you say that you haven't? I'm just trying to understand where your frustration is coming from.   Unless the person is being rude or pushy, I think your best bet is just to respond "Nope! Not yet.  But I've heard it's good" or something equally noncommittal.

It's the "yet" that's bugging me - as if I have nothing better to do with my time and want to spend all my time at my job, plus it's assuming I'd actually want to see that particular movie, or that it wouldn't trigger horrible memories for me (Into the Storm, because I've experienced tornadoes in real life). There's loads of movies out right now, but I don't necessarily want to see all of them, and getting into why could potentially be awkward - "What do you mean, you don't like that actor? He's the greatest actor of all time!" "I can't believe you don't like that genre!"

How would a customer even know something like this?

Pod to MrsJWine, I think you're overthinking that one.

I have to agree. I think most people just tack the "yet" on the end without even thinking about it.
I truly doubt anyone is thinking "oh I bet this person has no life and sits in the movie theater on all of their off hours." They are just thinking "hey! They work at movie theater. Wonder if they've seen this one!" Or if they do think you watch every movie , it would be because that's what they think they would do. So it's a reflection on them, not you.
"Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind." - Dr. Seuss

bopper

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Re: How to Respond to These Customers?
« Reply #21 on: August 12, 2014, 08:55:12 AM »
I didn't know my FIL went to your movie theater!

He loves to "joke" with waiters, etc....my favorite was when we were in Germany and he was trying to joke in English.

TomatoBunny

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Re: How to Respond to These Customers?
« Reply #22 on: August 13, 2014, 10:11:39 AM »
-The ones who think they're clever by intentionally messing up the name of the movie they're seeing, like in the vein of "Mist of the Monkeys" for "Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" (this was an actual one). This kind of thing really throws me off, because I have to try to decipher what they mean before I can even tell them whether they can go in yet.

I have to wonder, does shortening(/mangling the actual title) cause the same confused response? I'd probably call that movie 'Dawn of the Apes' or 'Planet of the Apes' just because it's so long the title wouldn't string together in my mind when you asked me.  :-\   I tend to shorten down titles; recently "How to Train Your Dragon 2" became just 'Dragons' when I was trying to remind the person I was with what movie we were seeing (she had an unexpected brain blip or something and didn't answer the employee when asked), but the order taker overheard me and guessed/took the order off of it.  :-[   If I went to see "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles", I'd probably just call it "Turtles".  Or I drop the subtitle it may have, like Star Trek: Into Darkness is just "Star Trek". 

I feel like, well, it's not like there was another 'Star Trek' film playing at the same time. Or more than likely, not another movie about turtles available. But, I also don't want to be needlessly confusing people because I'm not taking an extra second to say the actual title properly, since just because I know what I mean, doesn't mean other people will.

violinp

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Re: How to Respond to These Customers?
« Reply #23 on: August 13, 2014, 04:09:59 PM »
-The ones who think they're clever by intentionally messing up the name of the movie they're seeing, like in the vein of "Mist of the Monkeys" for "Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" (this was an actual one). This kind of thing really throws me off, because I have to try to decipher what they mean before I can even tell them whether they can go in yet.

I have to wonder, does shortening(/mangling the actual title) cause the same confused response? I'd probably call that movie 'Dawn of the Apes' or 'Planet of the Apes' just because it's so long the title wouldn't string together in my mind when you asked me.  :-\   I tend to shorten down titles; recently "How to Train Your Dragon 2" became just 'Dragons' when I was trying to remind the person I was with what movie we were seeing (she had an unexpected brain blip or something and didn't answer the employee when asked), but the order taker overheard me and guessed/took the order off of it.  :-[   If I went to see "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles", I'd probably just call it "Turtles".  Or I drop the subtitle it may have, like Star Trek: Into Darkness is just "Star Trek". 

I feel like, well, it's not like there was another 'Star Trek' film playing at the same time. Or more than likely, not another movie about turtles available. But, I also don't want to be needlessly confusing people because I'm not taking an extra second to say the actual title properly, since just because I know what I mean, doesn't mean other people will.

Oh, no; as long as there's an word that's actually from the title, I can understand easily what someone means. I just don't want something on the level of "The Fish Girl" when you (general) actually mean "The Little Mermaid." That's just obfuscation on purpose, though for what reason I have yet to fathom.
"It takes a great deal of courage to stand up to your enemies, but even more to stand up to your friends" - Harry Potter


VorFemme

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Re: How to Respond to These Customers?
« Reply #24 on: August 13, 2014, 04:33:33 PM »
 >:( :( The Fish Girl???  :o 8) ??? :P :-[  Oh, my diety, no!  :-X :-\ :'(

Seriously, Hans Christian Andersen did not write "The Fish Girl"!

Disney did not swipe parts of the plot from his "The Little Mermaid" to make a movie entitled "The Fish Girl"!

Disney swipes only the best out-of-copyright classics in literature to rewrite for their movies - or in some cases (Mary Poppins comes to mind) actually pays for the movie rights before re-writing things to put the Disney slant on the original...

Snarky and Evil actually fainted, I think....they have been known to be overly dramatic, though - so they could just be acting...
« Last Edit: August 13, 2014, 04:52:36 PM by VorFemme »
Let sleeping dragons be.......morning breath......need I say more?

Raintree

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Re: How to Respond to These Customers?
« Reply #25 on: August 14, 2014, 04:35:54 AM »
I feel your pain; I used to work in a drugstore, and customers seemed to expect me to have tried every product in the store. So I'd get "which of these laundry detergents is better?" Or a question about a product that can easily be gleaned from reading the box, which the customers would expect me to do for them. They'd get all mad that I didn't "know the products." Well it's a drugstore, not a specialty shoe store. The pharmacist will know about the drug products but apart from that, I think you are on your own.

lowspark

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Re: How to Respond to These Customers?
« Reply #26 on: August 14, 2014, 09:14:01 AM »
Another pod to MrsJWine.

You are in a job where you work with the public. That means you are going to get inane comments and silly questions. It's just the nature of that job. I worked in retail for years in high school and college. I got all sorts of comments and questions that were, among other things, bizarre, repetitive, answer-in-front-of-their-nose, rude, impossible to answer, etc. I had people who came to the store because they were lonely or bored or something, wanting to have long chats about their lives.

Mostly it's just a case of spewing out the first thing that comes into their head. Asking if you've seen the movie is a question they might ask anyone, a friend, coworker, etc. But because you are working there, there is even more chance you've seen it. Sure they are making an assumption that you see all of them since you do work there, but really, is there harm in that? Just say, "No, not yet." Period. End of conversation.

I get that it becomes irritating to get this question, but I think assigning some kind of malice to it or spinning it into your own personal experience is way overthinking it. Sometimes the best way to get through the day is to just smile and go along to get along.

Dealing with the public can be tedious and frustrating and annoying. But it can also be interesting and entertaining and challenging. So if you find yourself thinking of it in negative ways too often, it might be better to seek out a job (if possible) that has less contact with the public.

magicdomino

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Re: How to Respond to These Customers?
« Reply #27 on: August 14, 2014, 11:30:55 AM »
I can understand someone thinking that a theater employee will have seen at least part of all of the movies, even if it is just stepping inside for a few minutes.  Something along the lines of some restaurants where the chef prepares samples of the day's specials for the servers.  That way, when a customer asks about the sauce, the server can answer, "It's a creamy white wine sauce with capers and parsley," rather than "It's, um, white."   ;)


Yvaine

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Re: How to Respond to These Customers?
« Reply #28 on: August 14, 2014, 11:33:10 AM »
I can understand someone thinking that a theater employee will have seen at least part of all of the movies, even if it is just stepping inside for a few minutes.  Something along the lines of some restaurants where the chef prepares samples of the day's specials for the servers.  That way, when a customer asks about the sauce, the server can answer, "It's a creamy white wine sauce with capers and parsley," rather than "It's, um, white."   ;)

I've seen little sheets at movie theaters that summarize the basic plot and the reasons for the rating (like, it's violent or racy or whatever). I've seen them set out for customers to read, but I bet employees get them too in those places. So even if you haven't seen the movie or tasted the sauce, you have an idea of what's in it.

bopper

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Re: How to Respond to These Customers?
« Reply #29 on: September 03, 2014, 03:41:18 PM »