Author Topic: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza  (Read 27076 times)

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Goosey

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Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
« Reply #75 on: August 26, 2014, 01:57:48 PM »
Nope - not at all, and not at all what I said.  I said I would not personally notice what other people did or did not eat unless I were right there and they were preventing me from taking my share, at which point I would say something.

So, (and again, not angry, just curious) why would you come into a thread about people noticing this type of thing and caring and declare that you'd neither notice nor care because its not important to you? Just seems very contrary and judgmental to those who do notice and care. Not to mention rather goading.

It's rather like going into a fan club just to say you do not like the subject of their gathering and other people shouldn't care so much about it either. Leaves everyone going  ??? and a little  >:( that you went out of your way just to poop on their discussion.
« Last Edit: August 26, 2014, 02:18:33 PM by Goosey »

chi2kcldy

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Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
« Reply #76 on: August 26, 2014, 01:59:53 PM »
This reminds me of the temp admin we had previously. We assumed something was up with the Thank You gifts from clients. Whenever she signed for a gift the basket was unwrapped before the rest of us could look at it. Eventually we caught on to what she was doing. The admin would open up the gift and take out the "good stuff."

Our director told her to not open anything and give him all the gifts from vendors going forward. She did not listen and opened a gift from a vendor to a coworker. It was a lovely Godiva Chocolate tower. Although the gift came from a common vendor, the vendor was the coworkers husband. Yep, genius opened our Senior Manager's present. Then ate a good portion of it. Needless to say, our director requested a new temp the following week.

It's a shame because he was going to hire her after the 90 days were up. ::)


amylouky

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Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
« Reply #77 on: August 26, 2014, 02:01:48 PM »
Fine. But that doesn't mean that taking more than your share is not rude to others who would like to part take. And that's what this thread is really about. YMMV.
And when it is food, EMuir is correct, a lot of times--and in a lot of jobs--you don't have time to get a different lunch. No, nobody's "entitled" to free food, but once the company has promised it, I think it's fair to assume it will be there and factor it into your day. Especially if it's meant to be a "working lunch."

And it's funny that there's the sentiment that "no one is entitled to free food" when the complainant is asking for their fair share, but perfectly okay when a higher up takes enough for their entire family.  ::)

Of course that is weird and rude.  I simply would not likely ever notice.  And I wouldn't be upset about not getting something for free.  Clearly not everyone agrees and that is fine.

I think that, in the OP case, it's not really "free food". Leftovers set out in a first come first serve area is free food. This was intended to provide lunch for everyone, as a thank you for working long hours/outside normal schedule. Taking the food issue out of it, say the boss came in with a stack of $tarbucks gift certs, and set them out for everyone. Would it be piggy/rude for someone to scoop most/all of them up? Of course. 

Lynn2000

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Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
« Reply #78 on: August 26, 2014, 02:16:30 PM »
Yes, the first round of the pizza is not really "free" in this case--the employees didn't have to pay cash for it, but they're giving up their weekend to be at the office, and providing them with food at the office not only boosts morale but also keeps them from going out to lunch (possibly taking longer to get back to work). So I would say everyone working at the office that day was entitled to a fair share of that lunch. Companies have different policies, but I think a safe assumption is that the food is meant to be eaten at the office, by employees, working that day, with all employees in the group getting roughly equal amounts.

So, taking any home would violate that, whether it was for yourself (living alone) or your family. Taking it for your family would also violate the rule that only employees can eat it. As would taking substantially more than the others in the group are getting, even if you intend to eat it yourself right then. Also, an employee who wasn't working that day, coming in specifically to get food, would violate the rule.

Which is not to say all of those behaviors are automatically rude--my boss would rather send a four-day-old pizza home with someone on Friday, than have it sit at the office untouched all weekend and be thrown out on Monday. But she gets to make that call because she's the boss. And taking home a pizza that others have had several days to eat on, is very different from taking home a fresh pizza the day it was delivered.
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DanaJ

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Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
« Reply #79 on: August 26, 2014, 02:20:52 PM »
We had a food thief at a school I taught at.  The thief would go into lunches and just take part of the lunch.  We though we knew who it was, but noone had caught the thief.  So, one week we all made two lunches for a few days.  One we kept with us and the other--with an extra little bit of an added ingredient--went in the fridge.
Sure enough we were able to figure out for sure who the thief was as he had to make several extra bathroom trips during the day. 
Nothing was ever said by us or thieft but we never had a food thief again.

When I see posts like this I feel I need to remind people that even though the thief wouldn't suffer if not for his/her own criminal activity in many, many juristictions if you tamper with food that you know someone will consume you can be charged with a criminal offense. Where I live, a similar office prank resulted in charges of "administering a noxious substance" and assault against the person who spiked their lunch with a laxative to punish a lunch thief.

Similarly, in many (if not most) North American locations you can not booby trap a car with the intent of injuring a would-be thief.

lowspark

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Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
« Reply #80 on: August 26, 2014, 02:22:45 PM »
I agree. I don't see this as "free food" at all. I see it as part of the compensation that the company is offering in exchange for the work I'm providing. If one of the employees takes so much that it precludes other employees from having any, he is actually dipping into their compensation.

AfleetAlex

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Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
« Reply #81 on: August 26, 2014, 02:33:23 PM »
I think I've told this story in another thread, but I used to work in a media office and we always got free food delivered from new restaurants or regular advertisers so that the on-air staff would talk about it. Our receptionist used to regularly take home a stack of food for her extended family (her children were grown but I think she lived with at least one of them) and the management didn't seem to care. For example, we got three trays of muffins sent over; she took a whole one home before some of us had a chance to even see them. (We worked odd shifts, not just 8-5, so there was a chance a couple on-air staff members wouldn't even know they were in the building.) That always rankled me.
I have a chronic case of foot-in-mouth disease.

Goosey

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Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
« Reply #82 on: August 26, 2014, 02:38:57 PM »
I agree. I don't see this as "free food" at all. I see it as part of the compensation that the company is offering in exchange for the work I'm providing. If one of the employees takes so much that it precludes other employees from having any, he is actually dipping into their compensation.
Even if it weren't compensation and just a random treat, though, I think common descency says you shouldn't take all of it or a significant portion of it yourself and deny others the chance

lowspark

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Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
« Reply #83 on: August 26, 2014, 02:40:51 PM »
I agree. I don't see this as "free food" at all. I see it as part of the compensation that the company is offering in exchange for the work I'm providing. If one of the employees takes so much that it precludes other employees from having any, he is actually dipping into their compensation.
Even if it weren't compensation and just a random treat, though, I think common descency says you shouldn't take all of it or a significant portion of it yourself and deny others the chance

I agree. I was just referring to the OP.

Goosey

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Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
« Reply #84 on: August 26, 2014, 02:43:20 PM »
I agree. I don't see this as "free food" at all. I see it as part of the compensation that the company is offering in exchange for the work I'm providing. If one of the employees takes so much that it precludes other employees from having any, he is actually dipping into their compensation.
Even if it weren't compensation and just a random treat, though, I think common decency says you shouldn't take all of it or a significant portion of it yourself and deny others the chance

I agree. I was just referring to the OP.
Oh, sorry!

I do think it's definitely MORE egregious when it's part of compensation!

Lynn2000

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Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
« Reply #85 on: August 26, 2014, 02:49:51 PM »
To follow up what I said about mentally dividing the amount of food by the amount of people, so I know what my share is--I know some people, generally reasonable and polite, who don't do that, because when they see "a lot" of food, they assume that whoever provided it knew what they were doing and thus there's enough for everyone to have a "normal" amount. I actually think that's quite reasonable and not at all rude, it's just that unfortunately, those assumptions are not always true.

For example, I was tasked with ordering pizza for the office, which I had little experience with. The boss was paying for it out of her own pocket and had an unrealistic idea of what pizza cost these days, so I was very conscious of not appearing, to her, to be frivolously spending her money. I figured 2 slices/person, because that's what I eat, and I think it was 7 people so I ordered 2 pizzas (16 slices, so a 2-slice margin of error). At the last minute my boss added several extra people to the lunch ::) and of course I was nervous about what I had ordered so I was watching everyone closely. I was pretty surprised to see so many people take 3 slices--couldn't they see there wasn't enough even at 2 slices/person?

And then when I came here to post about it I realized that for a lot of people, 3 slices is normal, so I was wrong in that assumption. And I didn't know what I was doing, and also was constrained by things outside of my control, so there really wasn't enough for everyone to take their "normal" amount. Ideally there should have been, but from my perspective it would have been better if people did a quick count, realized something was wrong, and tried to be part of the solution (taking only 1 slice at a time) instead of part of the problem. But, I can see how that would be well outside the normal thought process for a lot of people. Obviously in this case I was highly invested in seeing how much people ate.
~Lynn2000

lowspark

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Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
« Reply #86 on: August 26, 2014, 02:52:41 PM »
I agree. I don't see this as "free food" at all. I see it as part of the compensation that the company is offering in exchange for the work I'm providing. If one of the employees takes so much that it precludes other employees from having any, he is actually dipping into their compensation.
Even if it weren't compensation and just a random treat, though, I think common decency says you shouldn't take all of it or a significant portion of it yourself and deny others the chance

I agree. I was just referring to the OP.
Oh, sorry!

I do think it's definitely MORE egregious when it's part of compensation!

No apology necessary. I had to go back and read the OP to see what the actual story was again because I began posting additional comments but realized they didn't apply at all.  ;D

Yvaine

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Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
« Reply #87 on: August 26, 2014, 02:53:58 PM »
To follow up what I said about mentally dividing the amount of food by the amount of people, so I know what my share is--I know some people, generally reasonable and polite, who don't do that, because when they see "a lot" of food, they assume that whoever provided it knew what they were doing and thus there's enough for everyone to have a "normal" amount. I actually think that's quite reasonable and not at all rude, it's just that unfortunately, those assumptions are not always true.

For example, I was tasked with ordering pizza for the office, which I had little experience with. The boss was paying for it out of her own pocket and had an unrealistic idea of what pizza cost these days, so I was very conscious of not appearing, to her, to be frivolously spending her money. I figured 2 slices/person, because that's what I eat, and I think it was 7 people so I ordered 2 pizzas (16 slices, so a 2-slice margin of error). At the last minute my boss added several extra people to the lunch ::) and of course I was nervous about what I had ordered so I was watching everyone closely. I was pretty surprised to see so many people take 3 slices--couldn't they see there wasn't enough even at 2 slices/person?

And then when I came here to post about it I realized that for a lot of people, 3 slices is normal, so I was wrong in that assumption. And I didn't know what I was doing, and also was constrained by things outside of my control, so there really wasn't enough for everyone to take their "normal" amount. Ideally there should have been, but from my perspective it would have been better if people did a quick count, realized something was wrong, and tried to be part of the solution (taking only 1 slice at a time) instead of part of the problem. But, I can see how that would be well outside the normal thought process for a lot of people. Obviously in this case I was highly invested in seeing how much people ate.

And then you get into situations where you don't know if more is coming! A wedding buffet might be a good example. If you look around and there are about 50 guests, and you only see 25 chicken breasts, does that mean only half of you can get chicken, or will the caterer bring out more when the dish is empty? It's not always easy to guess.

lowspark

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Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
« Reply #88 on: August 26, 2014, 02:56:18 PM »
To follow up what I said about mentally dividing the amount of food by the amount of people, so I know what my share is--I know some people, generally reasonable and polite, who don't do that, because when they see "a lot" of food, they assume that whoever provided it knew what they were doing and thus there's enough for everyone to have a "normal" amount. I actually think that's quite reasonable and not at all rude, it's just that unfortunately, those assumptions are not always true.

For example, I was tasked with ordering pizza for the office, which I had little experience with. The boss was paying for it out of her own pocket and had an unrealistic idea of what pizza cost these days, so I was very conscious of not appearing, to her, to be frivolously spending her money. I figured 2 slices/person, because that's what I eat, and I think it was 7 people so I ordered 2 pizzas (16 slices, so a 2-slice margin of error). At the last minute my boss added several extra people to the lunch ::) and of course I was nervous about what I had ordered so I was watching everyone closely. I was pretty surprised to see so many people take 3 slices--couldn't they see there wasn't enough even at 2 slices/person?

And then when I came here to post about it I realized that for a lot of people, 3 slices is normal, so I was wrong in that assumption. And I didn't know what I was doing, and also was constrained by things outside of my control, so there really wasn't enough for everyone to take their "normal" amount. Ideally there should have been, but from my perspective it would have been better if people did a quick count, realized something was wrong, and tried to be part of the solution (taking only 1 slice at a time) instead of part of the problem. But, I can see how that would be well outside the normal thought process for a lot of people. Obviously in this case I was highly invested in seeing how much people ate.

This is probably a learn-by-experience thing for most people. When I'm hosting something, I tend to provide way too much food. The horrors of running out! So even if I were in charge of ordering on someone else's dime, as you were, I'd probably over order. But in that case, I'd just check in with the person who was footing the bill.

"There are going to be seven people eating, I'm thinking three large pizzas plus a couple orders of breadsticks. Does that sound about right to you?"

They can then chime in to say it's too much or not enough or whatever. I'd just way rather have leftovers than have someone looking for more food and not finding it.

siamesecat2965

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Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
« Reply #89 on: August 26, 2014, 03:25:24 PM »
One company I worked at handled this situation very well-if there were parties for clients, etc, it was always announced "Guests are served first, and then staff". People were very cooperative all around concerning food.

 

Several jobs ago, we did this as well. I worked for a large pharma company, on the executive floor, so we got a lot of higher ups from our home office, overseas. And they would go all out for meals and such for meetings. I still recall one, wehre they put out such a spread,

Hot food, salads, sandwiches, desserts, what have you, and it was barely touched. After it was over, we could go in and grab some food, but were amazed at just how much was left!   We all took some for lunch, and our boss kept encouraging us to take the rest home for us and our families, as it would go to waste, but like I said, small floor, not a lot of staff, but wow.  But I know that isn't the norm.