Author Topic: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza  (Read 38970 times)

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AzaleaBloom

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Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
« Reply #90 on: August 26, 2014, 03:37:27 PM »
At my work, it used to be they would do things like get pizza or food from a local restaurant delivered for everyone - office staff and line workers included.

Those of us who were part of the office staff (4 of us) knew that if we wanted to eat, we had to get there before line workers did.  Otherwise, they would load up multiple plates and those who were later in line would not get anything.  I think they took the bosses very literally when they said "Help yourselves!  Take as much as you want!"

 I learned to bring lunch with me on those days just in case - I get thirty minutes for lunch and traffic is terrible where I work.  It's almost impossible to get somewhere, get lunch, and get back in thirty minutes.

They resolved this issue by doing things like having one of the bosses grill and hand the food to the employees, or by having someone come in to prepare made-to-order omelets. 





DanaJ

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Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
« Reply #91 on: August 26, 2014, 05:07:11 PM »
This is probably a learn-by-experience thing for most people. When I'm hosting something, I tend to provide way too much food. The horrors of running out! So even if I were in charge of ordering on someone else's dime, as you were, I'd probably over order. But in that case, I'd just check in with the person who was footing the bill.

Our events co-ordinator says she budgets for a minimum 10% over-run. If 50 people are coming, she makes sure there are plated meals for 55.

Reading this thread makes me really appreciate my co-workers. When we have pizza, people take one slice at a time. Sure, some may end up eating three or four slices, but everyone only takes a single slice at a time, so everyone gets a chance to get something.

VorFemme

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Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
« Reply #92 on: August 26, 2014, 06:10:36 PM »
To follow up what I said about mentally dividing the amount of food by the amount of people, so I know what my share is--I know some people, generally reasonable and polite, who don't do that, because when they see "a lot" of food, they assume that whoever provided it knew what they were doing and thus there's enough for everyone to have a "normal" amount. I actually think that's quite reasonable and not at all rude, it's just that unfortunately, those assumptions are not always true.

For example, I was tasked with ordering pizza for the office, which I had little experience with. The boss was paying for it out of her own pocket and had an unrealistic idea of what pizza cost these days, so I was very conscious of not appearing, to her, to be frivolously spending her money. I figured 2 slices/person, because that's what I eat, and I think it was 7 people so I ordered 2 pizzas (16 slices, so a 2-slice margin of error). At the last minute my boss added several extra people to the lunch ::) and of course I was nervous about what I had ordered so I was watching everyone closely. I was pretty surprised to see so many people take 3 slices--couldn't they see there wasn't enough even at 2 slices/person?

And then when I came here to post about it I realized that for a lot of people, 3 slices is normal, so I was wrong in that assumption. And I didn't know what I was doing, and also was constrained by things outside of my control, so there really wasn't enough for everyone to take their "normal" amount. Ideally there should have been, but from my perspective it would have been better if people did a quick count, realized something was wrong, and tried to be part of the solution (taking only 1 slice at a time) instead of part of the problem. But, I can see how that would be well outside the normal thought process for a lot of people. Obviously in this case I was highly invested in seeing how much people ate.

And then you get into situations where you don't know if more is coming! A wedding buffet might be a good example. If you look around and there are about 50 guests, and you only see 25 chicken breasts, does that mean only half of you can get chicken, or will the caterer bring out more when the dish is empty? It's not always easy to guess.

My last job, for several years, the practice had been getting a buffet set up with 300 hamburgers and 300 hot dogs for a set price from the basement cafeteria - for years.  When the manager ordered food for 300 - that was what was meant, understood, and delivered.

Some people got one of each, some got two of one, some got two of the other, and a very few got one of only one.  There would be a call for the leftovers, if there were any, after the staff and then the managers went through the line.  The very few leftovers might be set aside in the break room fridge - in case someone got hungry before the evening shift got served their "lunch".

First lunch in a new building, the manager ordered food for 300 from the new manager of the new cafeteria (same company) in the basement and the price was very, very close to the same amount as it had been three months earlier in the old building.

But what was set up for the 300 people was 150 hamburgers and 150 hot dogs, while everyone was continuing to use the old "get two of something" habit.  A manager asked when they were going to restock and was told about 1/3 of the way through 300 people that only 300 total meals had been prepared...not 600 pieces for 300 meals.

A lot of pizza was immediately ordered with instructions to limit people to no more than 3 slices on the first time through the line with an announcement for people to come back for seconds after everyone had been served.  Managers & supervisors checked their people to make sure that everyone had some food at their desk (this was a perk for working without breaks due to an emergency in our calling area or when another region had lost power/phone service and we were having to cover two regions temporarily - it didn't happen often, but this was the established procedure).

After the fiasco with only half the food expected being delivered and the extra money to cover the emergency order of pizza coming out of the manager's pockets (or so scuttlebutt said) - they no longer ordered hamburgers & hot dogs from the basement cafeteria - but went straight through to ordering a great many pizzas....it was easier to *remind* people to start with three slices of pizza and then come through after everyone had been served.

And those people who had preferred hot dogs or hamburgers to pizza still had the option to grab something downstairs in the cafeteria, just not at company/senior management's expense. 
Let sleeping dragons be.......morning breath......need I say more?

TootsNYC

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Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
« Reply #93 on: August 26, 2014, 08:38:17 PM »
I agree. I don't see this as "free food" at all. I see it as part of the compensation that the company is offering in exchange for the work I'm providing. If one of the employees takes so much that it precludes other employees from having any, he is actually dipping into their compensation.
[/quote

I buy lunch for my people when we are busy and they can't leave their desks.

It's not really compensation, in my mind. It's definitely not a perk. (It actually makes me kind of angry to have it defined that way--when you are working through your lunch period, feeding you is the -least- your boss can do. I get a little "huh?" when my team -thanks- me for ordering lunch. I'm making you work at your desk instead of letting you take a break--why are you thanking me?)

It's a tool for them to do their jobs--just as their computer is a tool, and their desk chair.

I'd be reaming someone out if they took it for themselves, or if they took enough that other people didn't get some. Once it's all leftovers, and everyone on staff has had a full lunch, then I don't care what happens to it.

But up until that point, it's *my* food. And I am giving it to the people who need it to do their jobs.


(I posted about a problem we were having--four departments worked through lunch, and food was ordered, but the email went out to the whole staff. And people from other departments, who weren't on deadline, got all the food, and those of us who were working didn't get there in time. The guy in charge said, "You can't just invite some people." My answer was: "Yes, you can--this isn't a social occasion, this is work.")

Curly Wurly Doggie Breath

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Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
« Reply #94 on: August 26, 2014, 11:57:44 PM »
To follow up what I said about mentally dividing the amount of food by the amount of people, so I know what my share is--I know some people, generally reasonable and polite, who don't do that, because when they see "a lot" of food, they assume that whoever provided it knew what they were doing and thus there's enough for everyone to have a "normal" amount. I actually think that's quite reasonable and not at all rude, it's just that unfortunately, those assumptions are not always true.

For example, I was tasked with ordering pizza for the office, which I had little experience with. The boss was paying for it out of her own pocket and had an unrealistic idea of what pizza cost these days, so I was very conscious of not appearing, to her, to be frivolously spending her money. I figured 2 slices/person, because that's what I eat, and I think it was 7 people so I ordered 2 pizzas (16 slices, so a 2-slice margin of error). At the last minute my boss added several extra people to the lunch ::) and of course I was nervous about what I had ordered so I was watching everyone closely. I was pretty surprised to see so many people take 3 slices--couldn't they see there wasn't enough even at 2 slices/person?

And then when I came here to post about it I realized that for a lot of people, 3 slices is normal, so I was wrong in that assumption. And I didn't know what I was doing, and also was constrained by things outside of my control, so there really wasn't enough for everyone to take their "normal" amount. Ideally there should have been, but from my perspective it would have been better if people did a quick count, realized something was wrong, and tried to be part of the solution (taking only 1 slice at a time) instead of part of the problem. But, I can see how that would be well outside the normal thought process for a lot of people. Obviously in this case I was highly invested in seeing how much people ate.

And then you get into situations where you don't know if more is coming! A wedding buffet might be a good example. If you look around and there are about 50 guests, and you only see 25 chicken breasts, does that mean only half of you can get chicken, or will the caterer bring out more when the dish is empty? It's not always easy to guess.

My last job, for several years, the practice had been getting a buffet set up with 300 hamburgers and 300 hot dogs for a set price from the basement cafeteria - for years.  When the manager ordered food for 300 - that was what was meant, understood, and delivered.

Some people got one of each, some got two of one, some got two of the other, and a very few got one of only one.  There would be a call for the leftovers, if there were any, after the staff and then the managers went through the line.  The very few leftovers might be set aside in the break room fridge - in case someone got hungry before the evening shift got served their "lunch".

First lunch in a new building, the manager ordered food for 300 from the new manager of the new cafeteria (same company) in the basement and the price was very, very close to the same amount as it had been three months earlier in the old building.

But what was set up for the 300 people was 150 hamburgers and 150 hot dogs, while everyone was continuing to use the old "get two of something" habit.  A manager asked when they were going to restock and was told about 1/3 of the way through 300 people that only 300 total meals had been prepared...not 600 pieces for 300 meals.

A lot of pizza was immediately ordered with instructions to limit people to no more than 3 slices on the first time through the line with an announcement for people to come back for seconds after everyone had been served.  Managers & supervisors checked their people to make sure that everyone had some food at their desk (this was a perk for working without breaks due to an emergency in our calling area or when another region had lost power/phone service and we were having to cover two regions temporarily - it didn't happen often, but this was the established procedure).

After the fiasco with only half the food expected being delivered and the extra money to cover the emergency order of pizza coming out of the manager's pockets (or so scuttlebutt said) - they no longer ordered hamburgers & hot dogs from the basement cafeteria - but went straight through to ordering a great many pizzas....it was easier to *remind* people to start with three slices of pizza and then come through after everyone had been served.

And those people who had preferred hot dogs or hamburgers to pizza still had the option to grab something downstairs in the cafeteria, just not at company/senior management's expense.

Was the basement cafe spoken too about the lack of food ?

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eltf177

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Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
« Reply #95 on: August 27, 2014, 06:43:34 AM »
(I posted about a problem we were having--four departments worked through lunch, and food was ordered, but the email went out to the whole staff. And people from other departments, who weren't on deadline, got all the food, and those of us who were working didn't get there in time. The guy in charge said, "You can't just invite some people." My answer was: "Yes, you can--this isn't a social occasion, this is work.")

I would have left for the day at that point if I was treated like that. And no more working through lunch under any circumstances.

Whoever sent the e-mail to everyone should be hit with a clue-by-four, and the uninvited departments should have been told "no food for you!". >:(

lowspark

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Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
« Reply #96 on: August 27, 2014, 09:01:33 AM »
I agree. I don't see this as "free food" at all. I see it as part of the compensation that the company is offering in exchange for the work I'm providing. If one of the employees takes so much that it precludes other employees from having any, he is actually dipping into their compensation.

I buy lunch for my people when we are busy and they can't leave their desks.

It's not really compensation, in my mind. It's definitely not a perk. (It actually makes me kind of angry to have it defined that way--when you are working through your lunch period, feeding you is the -least- your boss can do. I get a little "huh?" when my team -thanks- me for ordering lunch. I'm making you work at your desk instead of letting you take a break--why are you thanking me?)

It's a tool for them to do their jobs--just as their computer is a tool, and their desk chair.

I'd be reaming someone out if they took it for themselves, or if they took enough that other people didn't get some. Once it's all leftovers, and everyone on staff has had a full lunch, then I don't care what happens to it.

But up until that point, it's *my* food. And I am giving it to the people who need it to do their jobs.


(I posted about a problem we were having--four departments worked through lunch, and food was ordered, but the email went out to the whole staff. And people from other departments, who weren't on deadline, got all the food, and those of us who were working didn't get there in time. The guy in charge said, "You can't just invite some people." My answer was: "Yes, you can--this isn't a social occasion, this is work.")

I define compensation as something given or received as an equivalent for services. You gave your staff lunch in return for their work during the lunch hour. So to me, that is compensation.

As to them thanking you, this goes back to the discussion on whether it's necessary or desirable to thank people for doing things which are or can be perceived as an obligation. And again, I fall on the side of, yes, a thank you is appropriate.

I get paid for being here and doing my job every day. But people almost always say thank you to me when I provide the service I've been hired to do. It's common courtesy. By the same token, I thank people who help me do my job by answering questions or providing necessary information.

Thank you does not only apply to when someone goes above and beyond. It's nice to hear a thank you -- a note of appreciation -- even for things that are expected or routine.

jaxsue

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Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
« Reply #97 on: August 27, 2014, 10:02:13 AM »
I once had a boss, a vice-president of the dept, who took home the holiday baskets that companies had sent (the card was to the entire dept). Most of us were making minimum wage, and this guy made very good money. Ironically, we had to send a TY note to the companies on behalf of everyone in the department!  :-\

jaxsue

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Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
« Reply #98 on: August 27, 2014, 10:07:24 AM »
My office once received a gift basket of various foods addressed to everyone (about 10-12 people). Boss was off that day so I opened it and took a package of cookies and some others took other items. Boss came in the next day furious that we had opened the gift basket as she was planning to re-gift it to a client whose relative had died! She still brings it up half-jokingly about the gift basket meant for her that I "stole." Boss makes easily twice what I do and 4-5x what the other employees do. Gifts are never shared if she gets her hands on them first despite who they're addressed to.

I had bosses like that! I already posted about this, but to be short: one boss, a VP who had a high income, would take gift baskets that were intended for the entire dept home to his family.  >:(

jaxsue

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Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
« Reply #99 on: August 27, 2014, 10:10:09 AM »
I find it odd that so many people hog free food, but equally odd that so many people notice and care. No one is entitled to free food - not the people who hog it or the people who didn't.

Sorry, I disagree with this. There is a social contract, and people who are greedy are in the wrong.

VorFemme

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Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
« Reply #100 on: August 27, 2014, 10:53:28 AM »
To follow up what I said about mentally dividing the amount of food by the amount of people, so I know what my share is--I know some people, generally reasonable and polite, who don't do that, because when they see "a lot" of food, they assume that whoever provided it knew what they were doing and thus there's enough for everyone to have a "normal" amount. I actually think that's quite reasonable and not at all rude, it's just that unfortunately, those assumptions are not always true.

For example, I was tasked with ordering pizza for the office, which I had little experience with. The boss was paying for it out of her own pocket and had an unrealistic idea of what pizza cost these days, so I was very conscious of not appearing, to her, to be frivolously spending her money. I figured 2 slices/person, because that's what I eat, and I think it was 7 people so I ordered 2 pizzas (16 slices, so a 2-slice margin of error). At the last minute my boss added several extra people to the lunch ::) and of course I was nervous about what I had ordered so I was watching everyone closely. I was pretty surprised to see so many people take 3 slices--couldn't they see there wasn't enough even at 2 slices/person?

And then when I came here to post about it I realized that for a lot of people, 3 slices is normal, so I was wrong in that assumption. And I didn't know what I was doing, and also was constrained by things outside of my control, so there really wasn't enough for everyone to take their "normal" amount. Ideally there should have been, but from my perspective it would have been better if people did a quick count, realized something was wrong, and tried to be part of the solution (taking only 1 slice at a time) instead of part of the problem. But, I can see how that would be well outside the normal thought process for a lot of people. Obviously in this case I was highly invested in seeing how much people ate.

And then you get into situations where you don't know if more is coming! A wedding buffet might be a good example. If you look around and there are about 50 guests, and you only see 25 chicken breasts, does that mean only half of you can get chicken, or will the caterer bring out more when the dish is empty? It's not always easy to guess.

My last job, for several years, the practice had been getting a buffet set up with 300 hamburgers and 300 hot dogs for a set price from the basement cafeteria - for years.  When the manager ordered food for 300 - that was what was meant, understood, and delivered.

Some people got one of each, some got two of one, some got two of the other, and a very few got one of only one.  There would be a call for the leftovers, if there were any, after the staff and then the managers went through the line.  The very few leftovers might be set aside in the break room fridge - in case someone got hungry before the evening shift got served their "lunch".

First lunch in a new building, the manager ordered food for 300 from the new manager of the new cafeteria (same company) in the basement and the price was very, very close to the same amount as it had been three months earlier in the old building.

But what was set up for the 300 people was 150 hamburgers and 150 hot dogs, while everyone was continuing to use the old "get two of something" habit.  A manager asked when they were going to restock and was told about 1/3 of the way through 300 people that only 300 total meals had been prepared...not 600 pieces for 300 meals.

A lot of pizza was immediately ordered with instructions to limit people to no more than 3 slices on the first time through the line with an announcement for people to come back for seconds after everyone had been served.  Managers & supervisors checked their people to make sure that everyone had some food at their desk (this was a perk for working without breaks due to an emergency in our calling area or when another region had lost power/phone service and we were having to cover two regions temporarily - it didn't happen often, but this was the established procedure).

After the fiasco with only half the food expected being delivered and the extra money to cover the emergency order of pizza coming out of the manager's pockets (or so scuttlebutt said) - they no longer ordered hamburgers & hot dogs from the basement cafeteria - but went straight through to ordering a great many pizzas....it was easier to *remind* people to start with three slices of pizza and then come through after everyone had been served.

And those people who had preferred hot dogs or hamburgers to pizza still had the option to grab something downstairs in the cafeteria, just not at company/senior management's expense.

Was the basement cafe spoken too about the lack of food ?

Scuttlebutt said that there was a talk to the manager of the new cafeteria - but what I remember is that after that fiasco, food was ordered in from other locations (such as the pizza place) instead of from the basement cafeteria.  Apparently the price hadn't changed but the amount of food was cut in half - without any comment as to what was going on with the changes.

Not being a manager, I did not go to any "catered" meetings that might have been set up.  I didn't end up eating in the new cafeteria as I was part time and no longer got a distinct "lunch break" unless I combined my morning break and my afternoon break to get a chance to eat more than a snack.  I do seem to remember that there were comments about it being a bit more expensive but not quite as good (either in the taste of the food or the quantity of food for the money). 

I didn't have much time to listen to scuttlebutt in the break room, as my combined breaks were shorter than the official "lunch break" that full time workers had - I tended to hurry in and eat my food quickly, as if I got there later, there would be more people and it was considered "rude" to ask to heat your food earlier as you had only 30 minutes to eat instead of 45 minutes to an hour...you were supposed to "wait your turn" even if that left you five minutes to eat after your food heated....low power microwave took a little longer to heat things - but it wasn't being replaced until it wore out.  Since everything had been bought brand new when they built the building, that was going to take a while.....
Let sleeping dragons be.......morning breath......need I say more?

Lynn2000

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Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
« Reply #101 on: August 27, 2014, 11:01:06 AM »
Another thing about noticing how much food other people take, is that it isn't always about trying to catch someone out who's being bad and judge them. A lot of the time I'm watching other people for cues on what *I* should do, or if what I've already done is within the (very) local norms.

Like, if I decide to take just 2 cookies, and every other person takes 5, that doesn't mean they're all greedy pigs because they took more than I did. I would say it means that I was conservative in my estimate of what a fair share was, and quite likely it would be totally fine for me to take another 3 cookies at some point.

Similarly, if I take 5 cookies because math-wise, that's my share, but everyone else has just one, I'm going to feel like *I* was being a little greedy, because everyone else's perception of the situation was that only 1 cookie was the appropriate amount to take, for whatever reason. (Possibly they know the cookies aren't very good!) This is the same phenomenon that leads to no one wanting to be the first to cut into the cake or pie, to take roughly the same amount that the person before them took, etc.. I see that a lot in our office.

Of course as with anything there are bound to be mistakes and miscalculations--like the wedding buffet where you don't know if the caterer will be bringing out more food or not. The first people going through could be assuming there's plenty more food in the back, so they're taking their full "normal" portion, but then the later group sees only empty pans that aren't being replenished, so they have to cut back on their portions. It's not necessarily that the first group was rude or greedy, they were just acting under a misapprehension.
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Yvaine

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Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
« Reply #102 on: August 27, 2014, 11:10:45 AM »
Another thing about noticing how much food other people take, is that it isn't always about trying to catch someone out who's being bad and judge them. A lot of the time I'm watching other people for cues on what *I* should do, or if what I've already done is within the (very) local norms.

Like, if I decide to take just 2 cookies, and every other person takes 5, that doesn't mean they're all greedy pigs because they took more than I did. I would say it means that I was conservative in my estimate of what a fair share was, and quite likely it would be totally fine for me to take another 3 cookies at some point.

Similarly, if I take 5 cookies because math-wise, that's my share, but everyone else has just one, I'm going to feel like *I* was being a little greedy, because everyone else's perception of the situation was that only 1 cookie was the appropriate amount to take, for whatever reason. (Possibly they know the cookies aren't very good!) This is the same phenomenon that leads to no one wanting to be the first to cut into the cake or pie, to take roughly the same amount that the person before them took, etc.. I see that a lot in our office.

This. I think observing other people is actually a big part of etiquette, because it's how you get an idea of the norms in the specific setting you're in. It's like the thread we had a few months ago about a shouty person in exercise class. If you're in a class where that's the norm, shout away, but if you realize you're the only one shouting, turn it down.  ;D
« Last Edit: August 27, 2014, 11:35:43 AM by Yvaine »

greencat

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Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
« Reply #103 on: August 27, 2014, 11:31:36 AM »
It is, generally, rude, and frequently extremely noticeable, when one person takes an excessive amount of food or other items that was meant for a group to share.

I had a guest at my home do it once, and although he was welcome to partake of my hospitality, he consumed approximately 75% of the food I had prepared.  I had made enough food to feed about twenty people even though there were only about 6 guests and myself.  We realized it was him because he'd made repeated trips back into the kitchen and had apparently been stuffing his face while standing in the kitchen.

I got a little bug-eyed but didn't say anything.  The other guests, who for the most part had known him a bit longer than I had, laid into him on my behalf.  It ended up being kind of an intervention for him - he learned from the experience and was much more polite about the quantities of food he took from shared dishes in the future.

The Wild One, Forever

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Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
« Reply #104 on: August 27, 2014, 12:23:50 PM »
It is, generally, rude, and frequently extremely noticeable, when one person takes an excessive amount of food or other items that was meant for a group to share.

I had a guest at my home do it once, and although he was welcome to partake of my hospitality, he consumed approximately 75% of the food I had prepared.  I had made enough food to feed about twenty people even though there were only about 6 guests and myself.  We realized it was him because he'd made repeated trips back into the kitchen and had apparently been stuffing his face while standing in the kitchen.

I got a little bug-eyed but didn't say anything.  The other guests, who for the most part had known him a bit longer than I had, laid into him on my behalf.  It ended up being kind of an intervention for him - he learned from the experience and was much more polite about the quantities of food he took from shared dishes in the future.

This happened at a dinner to which I was invited back in my teenaged years, and even at my young age, I knew what a certain guest did was very rude.  I learned from it.

I was out west visiting an aunt and uncle, who lived in the California desert, and one night, the skies opened up and poured rain, which caused a major flood in their town and neighborhood.  (Some people living near them actually lost their lives, it was that horrible.)  Their house was completely filled with water, which we spent the day trying to dry out/clean up as best we could.

Neighbors of theirs down the street lived on slightly higher ground, and had suffered no flood damage at all.  They invited us all down for a meal and a rest later on, which was kind-hearted and very welcome.

In the midst of this chaos, a family friend, Clueless Magoo, shows up.  He lived near the beach in L.A., and had just moseyed on down for a weekend visit without any notice, and without calling first.  He basically sat there and *watched* us suck mud and water from the house with a shop vac and brooms and mops, all the while complaining that the pool was full of mud so he could not use it.   ::)

My aunt called the neighbors and told them there was an additional person at the house, and was told, of course, bring him, too.  The neighbor wife was of Indian descent and had prepared a delicious ethnic meal, chicken and rice and some veggie dish.  We sat down, and Clueless Magoo helped himself to easily *half* of the chicken and rice dish.  The look on the neighbor wife's face was priceless, and one I will never forget.  She was too nice a lady to say anything, but my uncle was not one to hold back emotions or thoughts, ever.  He said something along the lines of," hey Clueless, what in the ehell are the rest of us supposed to eat?  You weren't even supposed to be here and you are helping yourself to all the food, you ignorant so-and-so."  Clueless just shrugged and said he was extra hungry from his drive to the desert, (about 2 hours, maybe 3 in heavy traffic), and scarfed down his meal.  (I realize my uncle was rude, also, but I think Clueless wins the grand prize.)

There would have been plenty for everyone had Clueless not basically emptied the serving bowl onto his plate.  I was very young and inexperienced in etiquette intricacies at the stage of my life, but from that night on, I always made it a point to take very little food on the first pass, so that nobody would ever have to feel as uncomfortable as we all did at the dinner table.    ;D

 
Soft silly music is meaningful, magical