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Author Topic: Play date - how far would you go to accommodate 'fussy eater'?  (Read 17575 times)

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Outdoor Girl

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Re: Play date - how far would you go to accommodate 'fussy eater'?
« Reply #75 on: October 14, 2014, 08:30:20 AM »
We moved our entire house a mile and half up the road when I was 5.  The whole neighbourhood took the day off to watch the proceedings and help, if they could.  My friend lived across the road from the original house location and her mother took it upon herself to make sure I didn't get underfoot that day and that I was looked after if my parents got tied up.  Turns out, they did get tied up when my Dad almost took three fingers off when the chainsaw bucked and Mom had to take him to Emerg.

So I went home with my friend for supper.  Where they served baked beans.  Which I hated.  What did I do?  I ate them.  And never said a word.  When I saw my Mom later, she asked what I'd had for dinner; she was very proud of me for just eating them and not complaining.  No, Mom - I only complain to you!
After cleaning out my Dad's house, I have this advice:  If you haven't used it in a year, throw it out!!!!.
Ontario

sleepy59

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Re: Play date - how far would you go to accommodate 'fussy eater'?
« Reply #76 on: October 14, 2014, 10:43:42 AM »
My daughter had a couple of friends who were really picky about what they ate. 

M came to tea one night and informed me when I told her that I was cooking pizza for tea that she only ate grilled chicken, grilled bacon or chocolate spread on white bread.  I called her mum who confirmed what M had just told me.  I was on a very tight budget at the time and didn't have any of those things in the house (we only ate brown bread).  Thankfully my oldest offered to pop to the local corner shop to buy a loaf of bread and some chocolate spread.  M and her parents didn't even say thank you for the last minute catering so she was never invited back to play if it involved a meal time.

When A was coming to tea for the first time her mum called me in advance to tell me that A would only eat Marmite on toast, she offered to send some bread and marmite round so as not to inconvenience me.  I thanked her for the offer and explained that I had marmite and if A wouldn't eat brown bread I would buy a white loaf when I did the shopping.  A was so thankful that I didn't make her feel bad about the food.  A was invited back lots of times, it turns out that she had a lot of food allergies which weren't diagnosed until she was about 10 but there was nothing in bread and marmite that made her feel ill which is why she ate it.  Unfortunately as a 5 year old she wasn't able to put it into words.

I think the biggest difference is that M's mother didn't warn me in advance and expected me to be able to cater for her picky child with no notice.  On the other hand A's mum knew that her daughters food choices might be difficult/unexpected and made sure that I was aware of them and offered to provide the prefered food.

Lynn2000

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Re: Play date - how far would you go to accommodate 'fussy eater'?
« Reply #77 on: October 14, 2014, 12:39:54 PM »
My daughter had a couple of friends who were really picky about what they ate. 

M came to tea one night and informed me when I told her that I was cooking pizza for tea that she only ate grilled chicken, grilled bacon or chocolate spread on white bread.  I called her mum who confirmed what M had just told me.  I was on a very tight budget at the time and didn't have any of those things in the house (we only ate brown bread).  Thankfully my oldest offered to pop to the local corner shop to buy a loaf of bread and some chocolate spread.  M and her parents didn't even say thank you for the last minute catering so she was never invited back to play if it involved a meal time.

When A was coming to tea for the first time her mum called me in advance to tell me that A would only eat Marmite on toast, she offered to send some bread and marmite round so as not to inconvenience me.  I thanked her for the offer and explained that I had marmite and if A wouldn't eat brown bread I would buy a white loaf when I did the shopping.  A was so thankful that I didn't make her feel bad about the food.  A was invited back lots of times, it turns out that she had a lot of food allergies which weren't diagnosed until she was about 10 but there was nothing in bread and marmite that made her feel ill which is why she ate it.  Unfortunately as a 5 year old she wasn't able to put it into words.

I think the biggest difference is that M's mother didn't warn me in advance and expected me to be able to cater for her picky child with no notice.  On the other hand A's mum knew that her daughters food choices might be difficult/unexpected and made sure that I was aware of them and offered to provide the prefered food.

It sounds to me like there was also a difference in the kids' attitudes--from the way it's described, M sounds a bit snotty and ungrateful, while A was appreciative and cheerful (as were their parents). Stories like A's make it hard to dismiss picky eaters, I think--obviously there's nothing medical about needing spaghetti on Thursdays, but with other young kids it could be that eating certain common things makes them feel ill, though not ill enough to be obvious (vomiting, for example), and they don't know how to explain that well or even that it indicates there's something wrong.
~Lynn2000

zyrs

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Re: Play date - how far would you go to accommodate 'fussy eater'?
« Reply #78 on: October 14, 2014, 11:30:57 PM »
Silly Mark's mother -  Thursday is pizza day and Tuesday is spaghetti day.  >:D 

I would avoid having Mark over for play dates at any times where food would be served.  His mother really isn't doing her son any favors.