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Author Topic: Are mashed potatoes a big deal for you?  (Read 18205 times)

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Slartibartfast

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Re: Are mashed potatoes a big deal for you?
« Reply #60 on: November 21, 2014, 05:51:19 PM »
Funny that I stumble on this thread while I literally have mashed potatoes in the microwave waiting for me right now  :)

I wouldn't say they're a "big deal" in the sense that they're holiday-only, but they are usually a component of Thanksgiving dinner.  The non-negotiables are:

- turkey
- cranberry sauce/dressing/jelly
- stuffing or dressing
- mashed potatoes

There are some other common sides, like green beans or sweet potato casserole, but those are the major staples that I would expect if I were invited to someone else's house for Thanksgiving day.  I'm actually planning to do duck this year instead of turkey, and I've had to warn everyone  :P

Sharnita

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Re: Are mashed potatoes a big deal for you?
« Reply #61 on: November 21, 2014, 10:05:04 PM »
Yeah, I'd agree that they are non-negotiable on Thanksgiving.

kareng57

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Re: Are mashed potatoes a big deal for you?
« Reply #62 on: November 22, 2014, 12:28:08 AM »
I like them for holiday dinners, but I do them ahead of time.  I hate the beat-the-clock issues around the side dishes after the Roast Beast has been done and is waiting to be carved.

The make-ahead recipe I use originally called for cream cheese and sour cream along with the mashed potatoes and some garnishes.  I found this to be too rich and skipped the cream cheese - it still seemed fine.  My friend tells me that she doesn't do anything different re make-ahead - just does her normal mashed-potato bit the day before and it turns out fine.

Re mashed-potato bars - they're still a common banquet offering around here.

veryfluffy

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Re: Are mashed potatoes a big deal for you?
« Reply #63 on: November 22, 2014, 02:15:27 AM »
I think I am getting the idea here that anyone who loves "mashed potatoes", is putting  in a lot more stuff, mainly a lot of butter and maybe cheese.

Anyone in the UK do anything other than peel - boil - mash - add a bit of butter and/or (semi-skimmed) milk?  And do any UK (or other non-US) folks serve mash with roast turkey? (Which here is mainly the Christmas dinner.)
   

mechtilde

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Re: Are mashed potatoes a big deal for you?
« Reply #64 on: November 22, 2014, 02:33:21 AM »
I'm in the UK and find the 100% potato version a bit heavy, so I make it 50/50 with swede (rutabaga) and milk. It's a lighter version of the Scottish Clapshot which is done with butter, black pepper and chives.

ETA- I forgot- for special occasions like Christmas I sometimes make Duchesse Potatoes, where they are piped using a piping bag then baked. It sounds like a lot of unnecessary work until you realise that you can make them in advance, freeze them (unbaked) on a tray, then when solid keep them in a normal storage tub in the freezer. When you want to use them you can just get them out, put them on a baking tray, allow to defrost and bake.
« Last Edit: November 22, 2014, 02:39:25 AM by mechtilde »
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TeamBhakta

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Re: Are mashed potatoes a big deal for you?
« Reply #65 on: November 22, 2014, 04:28:22 PM »
Plain old mashed potatoes are not of huge importance in my family. We'll usually skip mashed potatoes at a restaurant dinner buffet "because I want so save my calories, starches, etc for something special." And with my dad being diabetic, there's a tendency to quietly nudge him toward "How about some fresh green beans / a salad instead ?"

There is a bit of disappointment for us when a dinner host serves boxed mashed potatoes, although that kind of comment is confined to private conversations later. I can totally relate to the Mike & Molly Thanksgiving episode where Molly is angrily cooking and everyone pipes up with "Oh, mashed potatoes ? I was hoping for (other potato dishes)  :(...*backs away from yelling* Um, mashed potatoes are fine! Never mind, never mind  :o"

catwhiskers

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Re: Are mashed potatoes a big deal for you?
« Reply #66 on: November 23, 2014, 12:36:32 AM »
I think I am getting the idea here that anyone who loves "mashed potatoes", is putting  in a lot more stuff, mainly a lot of butter and maybe cheese.

Anyone in the UK do anything other than peel - boil - mash - add a bit of butter and/or (semi-skimmed) milk?  And do any UK (or other non-US) folks serve mash with roast turkey? (Which here is mainly the Christmas dinner.)

I'm in the UK. I love mashed potatoes, but all I do is the peel, boil, mash and add a small amount of butter and semi skimmed milk routine. I don't really enjoy mash with anything else added - unless I'm frying up the leftovers with chopped onion and bacon for breakfast the next morning. :)

ETA: Forgot to say, I serve them with any kind of roast meat including turkey.
« Last Edit: November 24, 2014, 04:49:32 PM by catwhiskers »

SadieBaby

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Re: Are mashed potatoes a big deal for you?
« Reply #67 on: November 23, 2014, 03:40:11 PM »
I love mashed potatoes and so does my son, now grown up and living 1800 miles away.  I use my mom's recipe, which is merely lots of butter and evaporated milk out of the can, plus salt and pepper to taste.  Oh, and they are peeled and either riced or forked and then lightly touched with the electric mixer.

Dazi

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Re: Are mashed potatoes a big deal for you?
« Reply #68 on: November 23, 2014, 06:39:29 PM »
I am quite fond of the potato. I don't eat them often though...it's just too many carbs. It's a hard choice between mashed potatoes  (I like mine with evaporated milk and extra butter) and potato salad.
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Library Dragon

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Re: Are mashed potatoes a big deal for you?
« Reply #69 on: November 23, 2014, 08:45:59 PM »
We have mashed potatoes once or twice a month.  They may have garlic or bacon added depending on the protein and the way that's prepared.  For holidays if it's just family I may make dauphinoise potatoes  with lots of blue cheese.  If we have company I add mashed potatoes so there's something familiar.  One year DSs asked for homemade Mac-n-Cheese with very sharp cheddar instead of potatoes.

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nutraxfornerves

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Re: Are mashed potatoes a big deal for you?
« Reply #70 on: November 23, 2014, 09:34:27 PM »
If you use a ricer, you don't need to peel the potatoes. Just put potato pieces into the ricer. The potatoes are extruded out & the peels stay behind. I try to use the smallest potatoes possible (and it's hard to find small russets, the kind you ned for mashed) so I can cook them whole & have them absorb less water. If I'm stuck, I cut them in large pieces. Whole potatoes do take longer than cut up ones.

Cook's Illustrated recommends adding butter first, to sort of coat the starch so it doesn't combine with the water component of milk or cream or whatever & turn the potatoes gluey. I get really lazy--I put pats of room temperature butter into the ricer with the hot potatoes and extrude them together. Makes it really easy to mix in the butter. If I'm adding garlic, I just rice the cooked cloves with the potatoes.

(By the way, a ricer makes a great spinach moosher if you want to get all the liquid out of it before adding it to some recipe.)

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AnnaJ

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Re: Are mashed potatoes a big deal for you?
« Reply #71 on: November 23, 2014, 11:13:29 PM »
Just had some with dinner - potatoes, butter, and milk.

If I buy the meat prepared - a rotisserie chicken or a rack of ribs - I might make them from a package since I don't have the meat cooking time to fix them.  Also I sometimes use them to top a shepherd's pie, they tend to be the right consistency.

A colleague of mine actually thinks they taste the same as homemade  :o .  The mind boggles. 

lowspark

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Re: Are mashed potatoes a big deal for you?
« Reply #72 on: November 24, 2014, 12:09:33 PM »
I do buy instant mashed potato flakes as (in my opinion) they are really good for two things.
First, as a soup thickener. Add them into a broth based soup and they give it a less watery consistency. Second, when I've had an upset stomach and need to eat something sort of bland, I'll make a bit of instant mashed potatoes. Soothing on the stomach.
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#borecore

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Re: Are mashed potatoes a big deal for you?
« Reply #73 on: November 24, 2014, 02:13:28 PM »
I remembered a big part of why my mashed potatoes are a big deal -- it's because they're so much better than the ones you get by the trough-full at school/office holiday parties.

We just had a school Thanksgiving dinner, and my plate was a chewy oat roll, puddle of mashed potatoes, a pile of canned corn, a pond of sweet potatoes, a runny clot of cranberry sauce and a leaky lump of apple cobbler (hello, carbohydrates).  Getting really good homemade food is so nice!

magicdomino

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Re: Are mashed potatoes a big deal for you?
« Reply #74 on: November 24, 2014, 02:36:14 PM »
I do buy instant mashed potato flakes as (in my opinion) they are really good for two things.
First, as a soup thickener. Add them into a broth based soup and they give it a less watery consistency. Second, when I've had an upset stomach and need to eat something sort of bland, I'll make a bit of instant mashed potatoes. Soothing on the stomach.

Third purpose:  some bread recipes call for a small amount of mashed potatoes.  It's much easier to add some potato flakes and a little extra water.