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Author Topic: top layer of wedding cake  (Read 19600 times)

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#borecore

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Re: top layer of wedding cake
« Reply #15 on: November 25, 2014, 02:22:18 PM »
We had a grocery store cake that had no tiers. Saving it would have been a real challenge, with our cross-country move. We passed.

CakeEater

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Re: top layer of wedding cake
« Reply #16 on: November 25, 2014, 03:52:59 PM »
Or cake was fruit cake, but we had a small freezer, so we just saved two slices.

I've made 8 wedding cakes this year, and I think 2 were planning to save their top tier. Mine are mud cake, mostly, which does freeze really well, but unless you have a large freezer, that's a big thing to take up space for a whole year. Plus, there's a bit of a procedure for boxing/wrapping it to prevent freezer burn, and for defrosting to prevent it being soggy when you get it out.

Plus a 6-inch round, 4 inches high serves 12 people - that's a lot of cake for two of you to get through by yourselves, or otherwise you serve some guests 12-month old freezer cake.

I'd definitely pass.

jedikaiti

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Re: top layer of wedding cake
« Reply #17 on: November 25, 2014, 03:58:07 PM »
I've heard of it being done, but never actually noticed if it was done or not at any weddings I've been to. For ours, we had fruit tarts, so no top layer to freeze, but we probably wouldn't have, anyway. When we were still deciding on a dessert, I also noticed lots of bakeries offering a free anniversary cake as part of their package.
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jedikaiti

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Re: top layer of wedding cake
« Reply #18 on: November 25, 2014, 04:01:33 PM »
Or cake was fruit cake, but we had a small freezer, so we just saved two slices.

I've made 8 wedding cakes this year, and I think 2 were planning to save their top tier. Mine are mud cake, mostly, which does freeze really well, but unless you have a large freezer, that's a big thing to take up space for a whole year. Plus, there's a bit of a procedure for boxing/wrapping it to prevent freezer burn, and for defrosting to prevent it being soggy when you get it out.

Plus a 6-inch round, 4 inches high serves 12 people - that's a lot of cake for two of you to get through by yourselves, or otherwise you serve some guests 12-month old freezer cake.

I'd definitely pass.

I always thought that for the top tier, if you planned to save it, it would be much smaller - about right for 2 people, maybe with some left over.
What part of v_e = \sqrt{\frac{2GM}{r}} don't you understand? It's only rocket science!

"The problem with re-examining your brilliant ideas is that more often than not, you discover they are the intellectual equivalent of saying, 'Hold my beer and watch this!'" - Cindy Couture

ladyknight1

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Re: top layer of wedding cake
« Reply #19 on: November 25, 2014, 04:03:21 PM »
6" rounds are about as small as professional baking pans get.
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CakeEater

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Re: top layer of wedding cake
« Reply #20 on: November 25, 2014, 04:08:53 PM »
Or cake was fruit cake, but we had a small freezer, so we just saved two slices.

I've made 8 wedding cakes this year, and I think 2 were planning to save their top tier. Mine are mud cake, mostly, which does freeze really well, but unless you have a large freezer, that's a big thing to take up space for a whole year. Plus, there's a bit of a procedure for boxing/wrapping it to prevent freezer burn, and for defrosting to prevent it being soggy when you get it out.

Plus a 6-inch round, 4 inches high serves 12 people - that's a lot of cake for two of you to get through by yourselves, or otherwise you serve some guests 12-month old freezer cake.

I'd definitely pass.

I always thought that for the top tier, if you planned to save it, it would be much smaller - about right for 2 people, maybe with some left over.

It just depends on the sizes of the rest of the cake. If a 12" and a 9" round give you just the right amount of cake for all your guests, you need a 6" top tier.

A 4" round would serve 2 with a bit left over, but you're not going to use one on top of a 12"/9" combination, or on a 10"/8" combination.

scarlett

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Re: top layer of wedding cake
« Reply #21 on: November 25, 2014, 05:08:12 PM »
We saved the top of our cake; which got ruined in our move out of state. We ended up back at Wedding city and had same baker make us a new small cake. We enjoyed it on our 1st anniversary with one of my bridesmaids and it was great!

An aside, I was 4 when my oldest sister got married and I spent the year eating the wedding cake top bit by bit out of the freezer of our parent's house. When their anniversary came they were shocked that there was very little cake to eat!



Margo

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Re: top layer of wedding cake
« Reply #22 on: November 26, 2014, 03:47:09 AM »
I think traditionally wedding cake was fruit cake, and if it had been doused in some sort of alcohol, probably would have kept fairly well for a year. Modern cake? Not so much, even in a freezer.


Yup. It still is, in England. My understanding was that the top tier would be kept and used as Christening cake when the first child was born.

Traditional Wedding / Christmas cake is very rich and keeps beautifully - we once ended up with a spare Christmas cake for complicated reasons. It was wrapped up and spent the next 12 months in the back of the pantry and was eaten the following christmas. It was delicious.

As wedding cake would traditionally be covered with marzipan and royal icing it would be almost totally airtight  which would also help.

CLE_Girl

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Re: top layer of wedding cake
« Reply #23 on: November 26, 2014, 09:01:14 AM »

What I began seeing awhile ago is that cake makers would include in their packages an "anniversary" cake that they'd make for you fresh a year later, on the theory that freezing the top layer didn't yield the best of cakes, and took up too much room in the freezer.

This is what our bakery did.  The wedding package was 6 dozen cup cakes(minimum), a 6in top layer cake for cutting, the tiered display stand and a second 6in cake or 1/2dozen cup cakes a year later.  Was very nice to go get fresh cupcakes for our anniversary.

Nibsey

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Re: top layer of wedding cake
« Reply #24 on: November 26, 2014, 09:09:50 AM »
I think traditionally wedding cake was fruit cake, and if it had been doused in some sort of alcohol, probably would have kept fairly well for a year. Modern cake? Not so much, even in a freezer.


Yup. It still is, in England. My understanding was that the top tier would be kept and used as Christening cake when the first child was born.

Traditional Wedding / Christmas cake is very rich and keeps beautifully - we once ended up with a spare Christmas cake for complicated reasons. It was wrapped up and spent the next 12 months in the back of the pantry and was eaten the following christmas. It was delicious.

As wedding cake would traditionally be covered with marzipan and royal icing it would be almost totally airtight  which would also help.

This is what my parents did, even though my Mam had to get the cake re-iced but she said otherwise it was perfect.

I'm having chocolate cake for our wedding in May so won't be keeping the top tier. Not even sure how chocolate cake would cope with being frozen for that long.
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ClaireC79

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Re: top layer of wedding cake
« Reply #25 on: November 26, 2014, 11:35:02 AM »
I thought it was the top layer (fruitcake we're in the UK) was saved and was then the Christening Cake for your firstborn traditionally.

The amount of alcohol in them they stay edible (and taste the same) for years - they wouldn't be frozen though

Outdoor Girl

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Re: top layer of wedding cake
« Reply #26 on: November 26, 2014, 12:38:02 PM »
A friend of mine saved the top layer of her wedding cake (non-fruitcake) for the christening of her first child.  The cake was fine but the christening was only about 5 months after the wedding because she was almost 5 months along when she got married.

My Mom made fruitcake.  She'd cut large loaves in half and sell the half loaves at an annual bazaar our church held - and would still have to put about $10 on them because of the cost of the ingredients.  When she passed away, I found a couple of chunks in the freezer from the previous year and went ahead and put them in the bazaar.  They were fine.  Then a couple of years after that, I found another chunk!  We gave it to the couple who always bought it as a Christmas present but let them know the age.  They said it was still good.  And there wasn't any alcohol in it.
After cleaning out my Dad's house, I have this advice:  If you haven't used it in a year, throw it out!!!!.
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NestHolder

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Re: top layer of wedding cake
« Reply #27 on: November 26, 2014, 02:29:50 PM »
I've always heard that the tradition is that the top layer is saved for the christening of the first child.  We had the traditional (British) fruit cake, but I have no memory of whether we preserved the top layer, or if so, what we did with it.  As our DD was not christened until she was about twelve, I suspect the cake would probably have been a bit past it by then.

Margo

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Re: top layer of wedding cake
« Reply #28 on: November 27, 2014, 04:23:42 AM »
traditional fruit cake keeps very well whether or not it has alcohol in. My grandmother's recipe only uses about 2 tablespoons of brandy for a 10" cake (although I admit I put more in when I make it!)

oz diva

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Re: top layer of wedding cake
« Reply #29 on: November 27, 2014, 04:50:05 AM »
I think traditionally wedding cake was fruit cake, and if it had been doused in some sort of alcohol, probably would have kept fairly well for a year. Modern cake? Not so much, even in a freezer.


Yup. It still is, in England. My understanding was that the top tier would be kept and used as Christening cake when the first child was born.

Traditional Wedding / Christmas cake is very rich and keeps beautifully - we once ended up with a spare Christmas cake for complicated reasons. It was wrapped up and spent the next 12 months in the back of the pantry and was eaten the following christmas. It was delicious.

As wedding cake would traditionally be covered with marzipan and royal icing it would be almost totally airtight  which would also help.
My brothers did this. The cakes in question were both rich fruit cakes. One brother had to wait 12 years, the cake was delicious. It had been topped up with brandy periodically.

I had no wedding cake.

Victoria