News: IT'S THE 2ND ANNUAL GUATEMALA LIBRARY PROJECT BOOK DRIVE!    LOOKING FOR DONATIONS OF SCIENCE BOOKS THIS YEAR.    Check it out in the "Extending the Hand of Kindness" folder or here: http://www.etiquettehell.com/smf/index.php?topic=139832.msg3372084#msg3372084   

  • November 21, 2017, 08:17:46 AM

Login with username, password and session length

Author Topic: What an interesting assumption...because of course, I'm trying to kill Dad  (Read 11337 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

EllenS

  • Member
  • Posts: 4654
  • I write whimsical vintage mysteries.
    • My Author Page:
Re: What an interesting assumption...because of course, I'm trying to kill Dad
« Reply #15 on: December 30, 2014, 10:06:13 AM »
Type I - pancreas does not produce insulin, or not enough/reliably.
Type II - the body has become insulin-resistant, and may need larger amounts than it can produce on its own.

Venus193

  • Member
  • Posts: 17049
  • Backstage passes are wonderful things!
Re: What an interesting assumption...because of course, I'm trying to kill Dad
« Reply #16 on: December 30, 2014, 11:08:44 AM »
Most type 2 diabetics are simply insulin-resistant and need oral medication to be able to use it.  There are many different medications and the one prescribed will depend on the blood glucose level at diagnosis.  It can be stepped down if the patient follows doctor's orders and gets this under control.

"No sugar ever" isn't true, but you can't go nuts on it every day.  However, if you know how to bake you can certainly make cakes and pies with Splenda. 





suzieQ

  • Member
  • Posts: 528
Re: What an interesting assumption...because of course, I'm trying to kill Dad
« Reply #17 on: December 30, 2014, 02:51:59 PM »
Just to clarify, I was told my dad was a Type 2 diabetic? But he is insulin dependent... if I understand correctly, Type 1s produce too much insulin while Type 2s do not produce enough?

In any case, at Christmas I told Dad I'd brought him more cookies, and he grinned. Told him I'd also made him something he hadn't had in years. He immediately said "I can't have fudge." I responded "well drat, guess I will have to take this plate home then." His smile got bigger, and he said he could have a little, he supposed. Would not try my cookie butter fudge (sinfully decadent) but was thrilled with the chocolate fudge, telling me I make fudge almost as well as I make cookies (huge compliment, since that was from my 4th ever attempted batch of fudge).

Even with the junky food, Dad was good and his sugars were well controlled.

On a side note, Sis and her husband fell in love with my mom's walnut roll pastry recipe. BIL ate about half a roll by himself. If they had ANY idea of the amount of sugar in those things (the dough is even rolled out in powdered sugar, plus granulated is in the nut mixture), they'd be choking on hypocrisy in their anti sugar campaign.  >:D
Type 1 is an autoimmune disease, where the body has attacked itself, causing the pancreas to stop producing insulin.
Type 2 is a metabolic disease, where the body doesn't make proper use of the insulin it produces, so oral drugs to make it more insulin sensitive can be useful, but after many years of having type 2, a lot of these type of diabetics do also need supplemental insulin.
(going on insulin does not change a type 2 into a type 1, which is a common misconception - I know a nurse who believes that)

Chipmunky

  • Member
  • Posts: 610
Re: What an interesting assumption...because of course, I'm trying to kill Dad
« Reply #18 on: January 05, 2015, 07:27:55 AM »
Thanks everyone! Dad is a Type II insulin resistant. I recall he was on an oral tablet for some years (that being an awful patient like he is, he wasn't taking it properly), before his doctor made him go on injectable insulin. He's been a lot better about taking insulin and monitoring his sugars and intake since his diagnosis in the fall.

Also doesn't hurt that Mom is starting to use the same lines she did when he wasn't taking his heart medications and anti hypertensives, despite the lines not being ehell approved. (She's a very experienced nurse in both hospital and outpatient settings). She told him if he took his meds and had a heart attack or stroke resulting in impairment or injury, she'd take care of him herself for the rest of their lives. If he was a stubborn jerk who refused to take his meds and the same thing happened, she'd throw his stubborn butt in a nursing home so fast his head would spin (nursing homes in our area were very, very poorly run).

Guess who started taking his meds? >:D

Piratelvr1121

  • Member
  • Posts: 9123
Re: What an interesting assumption...because of course, I'm trying to kill Dad
« Reply #19 on: January 05, 2015, 07:48:37 AM »
Hah! I can't blame him, I once worked in a nursing home and wouldn't put anyone I loved there.*  The management seemed more interested in money than the actual patients, which led to choices that frustrated the poopadities out of those who actually did care about the residents.

One of my coworkers said she told her husband that if she needed to be put in a nursing home and this place was the only option? Call Dr. Kevorkian.  Most assisted living places I've seen are nice, but then my grandmother's care wasn't well monitored as she had celiac's and she'd of course forget that, having Alzheimer's, and the staff figured "oh well she's eating it, she can handle it." *facepalm*  She couldn't handle it at all and got sick.

*not to say people didn't love their family member who was placed there, as it might have been the only choice or they might have been fooled by the rosy impression given. 

My grandpa had type 2 as well and had the worst sweet tooth.  He never did manage it well and I was told that because they were raised with a belief of you don't question doctors, when he was told he had borderline diabetes, he didn't take it seriously and thus didn't bother testing his blood sugar or taking the medication.   It wasn't till my mother took over and went to the doctor visits with them that things got sorted out but he never was good about his meds.   And my grandmother (not the one with Alzheimer's) was a big baker and to her dessert meant "something with tons of sugar and butter" and when Mom suggested fruit over yogurt for dessert, it really didn't seem to compute, or so I was told.
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata