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Author Topic: Who provides the bonus?  (Read 9015 times)

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LadyBatman

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Re: Who provides the bonus?
« Reply #30 on: December 16, 2014, 09:25:30 AM »
You most certainly CAN renegotiate your wage for the separate housing now that you see the work that is involved. #2. You can't expect a tip. #3 although you lost your job a few years back you should try to rebuild your confidence. Maybe do a few refresher courses in that field. Get back out there and get your diploma working for you!

kategillian

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Re: Who provides the bonus?
« Reply #31 on: December 16, 2014, 09:45:16 AM »

I get an hourly rate when I clean the business's building.  The owner of the business asked me if I would clean the houses and said she would pay me $X.  It's a flat rate so no matter how long it takes me to clean the homes, that's what I'm paid.  So I can't raise my rates. 

You absolutely can and should raise your rates. Its called inflation, if you are getting paid the same amount that you were three years ago, you're actually getting paid less, because the money is not worth as much. There is also the concept that people value more expensive work or items over less expensive ones. Perhaps these people would value your work more (and maybe tip!) if they paid you an appropriate amount?

TootsNYC

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Re: Who provides the bonus?
« Reply #32 on: December 16, 2014, 09:47:47 AM »
Quote

I get an hourly rate when I clean the business's building.  The owner of the business asked me if I would clean the houses and said she would pay me $X.  It's a flat rate so no matter how long it takes me to clean the homes, that's what I'm paid.  So I can't raise my rates


I get that you aren't being paid a rate; you are being paid a set price.
So raise your set price.

Hmmmmm

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Re: Who provides the bonus?
« Reply #33 on: December 16, 2014, 10:41:17 AM »
OP, I really believe you need to think about the value of your time and whether you'd be able to make more money cleaning someone else's home those 2 days a week. Reliable housecleaner's are in great demand in my area. I pay our housekeeper $90 for about 4-5 hrs of cleaning. She doesn't have near the level of icky you have (I'd be terribly embarrassed if she found dog poop in my house). If she walked my dog, I'd be paying her even more. And I'll give her a weeks bonus this year.

Call another cleaning service and ask for their pay scale. Use that knowledge to determine if you are being adequately paid for your time. If not, tell the business owner that she'll need to increase your flat rate by $X amount or she'll need to find someone else to clean her client's and her daughter's homes. Then go to work for another service.

camlan

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Re: Who provides the bonus?
« Reply #34 on: December 16, 2014, 11:08:21 AM »
Wren, dear, there have been a lot of us with college degrees working at housekeeping jobs, or minimum wage retail jobs, or low-end service jobs. Sometimes it just happens. As long as it is honest work, it is a job and you are supporting yourself. That's something to be proud of, not ashamed of.

And you are clearly providing a) good service and b) a needed service. More reasons to be proud of what you do.

In your shoes, I'd go back to the company owner and re-negotiate your rates. Make a list of everything you clean, especially in the horrible house, so the owner knows what you have been doing. Include the dog-walking and mending. Then give the owner some options.

1. You get a higher flat fee for both houses, with a higher fee for the horrible house, as the work is much more demanding and takes more time. You continue to clean both houses as you have been doing, but the dog-walking and mending stop.

2. You get an hourly rate. Determine an hourly rate that will pay you more than what you are getting now. You continue to clean both houses as you have been doing, but the dog-walking and mending stop. Because of the extra work at the horrible house, it will take you longer to clean it and therefore you will get paid more.

3. You continue to get the same flat fee, but you reduce the amount of time spent in each house, and you don't do all the work you used to do. You no longer deal with used birth control products or animal waste, and if you can't clean those areas due to the waste, so be it. And of course, the dog-walking and mending stop.

4. Extras such as dog-walking and mending will be paid for separately, either by the owner or the homeowners. Find out how much dog-walkers charge in your area, and how much tailors charge for simple repairs and quote those prices. Other extra tasks can be added in at the homeowner's request, but additional fees will be charged.

This gives the owner the opportunity to pay you the same amount of money, but get slightly less service. If the owner doesn't want to spend more, this might be his choice. If the homeowners want you to do more, then they have to pay you the difference.
Nothing is impossible, the word itself says, “I’m possible!” –Audrey Hepburn


artk2002

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Re: Who provides the bonus?
« Reply #35 on: December 16, 2014, 11:23:23 AM »
You're being taken advantage of. Badly.

I think Camlan has a good summary of your options.
Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bow lines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.

Goog

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Re: Who provides the bonus?
« Reply #36 on: December 16, 2014, 11:31:00 AM »
Wren, dear, there have been a lot of us with college degrees working at housekeeping jobs, or minimum wage retail jobs, or low-end service jobs. Sometimes it just happens. As long as it is honest work, it is a job and you are supporting yourself. That's something to be proud of, not ashamed of.

And you are clearly providing a) good service and b) a needed service. More reasons to be proud of what you do.

In your shoes, I'd go back to the company owner and re-negotiate your rates. Make a list of everything you clean, especially in the horrible house, so the owner knows what you have been doing. Include the dog-walking and mending. Then give the owner some options.

1. You get a higher flat fee for both houses, with a higher fee for the horrible house, as the work is much more demanding and takes more time. You continue to clean both houses as you have been doing, but the dog-walking and mending stop.

2. You get an hourly rate. Determine an hourly rate that will pay you more than what you are getting now. You continue to clean both houses as you have been doing, but the dog-walking and mending stop. Because of the extra work at the horrible house, it will take you longer to clean it and therefore you will get paid more.

3. You continue to get the same flat fee, but you reduce the amount of time spent in each house, and you don't do all the work you used to do. You no longer deal with used birth control products or animal waste, and if you can't clean those areas due to the waste, so be it. And of course, the dog-walking and mending stop.

4. Extras such as dog-walking and mending will be paid for separately, either by the owner or the homeowners. Find out how much dog-walkers charge in your area, and how much tailors charge for simple repairs and quote those prices. Other extra tasks can be added in at the homeowner's request, but additional fees will be charged.

This gives the owner the opportunity to pay you the same amount of money, but get slightly less service. If the owner doesn't want to spend more, this might be his choice. If the homeowners want you to do more, then they have to pay you the difference.

Yes.

And I just have to say that from what I've heard, a housecleaner has a certain scope of duties for a regular weekly cleaning job.  Bigger jobs like washing the outside windows or something like that would be out of the scope, so would be negotiated and paid separately.  So I would say that condoms and pet excrement definitely do not fall in the scope of 'normal'.  And frankly, a used condom would be a biohazard, wouldn't it?  No way you should be dealing with something like that!

Tell them that you've done some reevaluating, and present them with a list of what will be cleaned.  Note that, for example, if floors are to be vacuumed, then the floor must be clear from clutter.  You will no longer open yourself up to the liability of touching personal belongings, so you will vacuum around whatever clutter is there.  Dog poop?  Nope.  Not in the contract.  If they want to negotiate that separately, be sure to do that for a separate fee, and document that it will be extra.  Have them sign off on anything that they agree to pay extra for, or you won't be cleaning it without their okay.  Same with the dog walking and the mending.  You won't do it unless it's agreed up (with a rate) in advance.

I think they need some pushback.  I can't believe people are standing in line to deal with their dog's poop and their used condoms.  So let them try to find someone else.  Treat this as a professional job, and view yourself that way.  Otherwise they'll keep taking advantage of you. 

apoptosis

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Re: Who provides the bonus?
« Reply #37 on: December 22, 2014, 02:36:33 AM »
I'm gathering from the tone of your question, that you are worried that you may lose your main job if you try to change the terms of your secondary jobs. I do understand with the economy today how valid that worry is, but I feel you should get paid what you are worth.
I certainly feel the person paying for the secondary jobs should be paying the expected Christmas bonus.

It seems your employer knows they are taking advantage of you. I think you have several options. The least awkward one is to tell your employer that you are changing from a set price to an hourly rate for the secondary jobs. That seems fair to you, and would be hard for the employer to argue. If they don't want to change, you should ask them to get someone else to do the secondary jobs.

Another option is to change the set rate for the secondary jobs to a level you feel is fair. If the employer is not willing, then again, ask them to get someone else for the secondary jobs.

The final option is to tell your employer that your schedule has gotten full and you aren't able to do the secondary jobs anymore. This avoids a confrontation with the employer about the rates and is an acceptable excuse with less chance of interfering with your main job. You don't feel fairly compensated on the secondary jobs anyway, and it sounds like your employer knows they are underpaying you.

I will tell you this, good housekeepers are golden and treasured and hoarded by smart homeowners. With the good job you are doing, even if you were to lose your job, after several new homes cleaned, your referrals will go through the roof.

Housekeepers have many backgrounds. I had a housekeeper who used to be an Eastern Airlines flight attendant until they went out of business. I had another housekeeper who was so good, I hired her to be my receptionist and eventually became my office manager.

On a side note, my own housekeeper has to clean dried urine off the floors. Last Christmas my dog came down with Diabetes, so now pees every hour around the clock. I can't keep up with it, though I try, and have towels everywhere. At least the Insulin has changed the pee from sticky (from sugar) to watery. It really is amazing how much a little dog can drink/pee with Diabetes. I fill gigantic water bowls several times a day. My housekeeper definitely gets a Christmas bonus!

JeanFromBNA

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Re: Who provides the bonus?
« Reply #38 on: December 23, 2014, 05:07:07 PM »
Reliable housekeepers are in great demand.  Don't sell yourself short.  If this employer fires you, you could easily find jobs elsewhere.

The lady who cleans my house has a master's in speech pathology.  She does it so she can set her own schedule and spend more time with her kids.  Frankly, she would have to double her rates before I would let her go because I remember my experience with services that ran the gamut from unreliable to theft for which they took no responsibility.

You sound like a valuable commodity.  Check out rates in your area (Craigslist is good), set yourself up in an LLC, and get busy.

gmatoy

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Re: Who provides the bonus?
« Reply #39 on: December 24, 2014, 01:28:18 PM »
Reliable housekeepers are in great demand.  Don't sell yourself short.  If this employer fires you, you could easily find jobs elsewhere.

The lady who cleans my house has a master's in speech pathology.  She does it so she can set her own schedule and spend more time with her kids.  Frankly, she would have to double her rates before I would let her go because I remember my experience with services that ran the gamut from unreliable to theft for which they took no responsibility.

You sound like a valuable commodity.  Check out rates in your area (Craigslist is good), set yourself up in an LLC, and get busy.

Because "business owner" is something your education prepared you for, isn't it? It taught you to think, give opinions, and determine whether the information you are given/finding is adequate and/or accurate. Yes, go into business for yourself, if only for a day or two of each week.