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Author Topic: Report bad driver to the boss?  (Read 11322 times)

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shortstuff

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Re: Report bad driver to the boss?
« Reply #15 on: January 06, 2015, 09:08:04 AM »
There is this stigma against "tattling". That stigma should be limited to only matters that are unrelated to the job. So you wouldn't tell his boss if you saw the driver cheating on his wife or being rude to a waiter or wearing plaid and stripes. You do tell the boss when he is driving dangerously on company time and he is a driver.

Give us a tricky one like driving dangerously on the weekend in his own vehicle or drinking to blackout and fights every night and we can have a debate. This one is a no brainer.

Well, this was after we had clocked out and were going home, so it was not on company time, and he was in his personal vehicle, but we were still on company property for some of it.  I see so far the overwhelming consensus is too report it. Any advice on wording?  I figure just stick to the facts, but as someone mentioned, I'm finding it hard to shake the sigma of being a tattler and therefore not being taken seriously.  I like the suggestion of the boss watching the lot one night.  That's something the owner has done before.

cicero

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Re: Report bad driver to the boss?
« Reply #16 on: January 06, 2015, 09:35:59 AM »
There is this stigma against "tattling". That stigma should be limited to only matters that are unrelated to the job. So you wouldn't tell his boss if you saw the driver cheating on his wife or being rude to a waiter or wearing plaid and stripes. You do tell the boss when he is driving dangerously on company time and he is a driver.

Give us a tricky one like driving dangerously on the weekend in his own vehicle or drinking to blackout and fights every night and we can have a debate. This one is a no brainer.

Well, this was after we had clocked out and were going home, so it was not on company time, and he was in his personal vehicle, but we were still on company property for some of it.  I see so far the overwhelming consensus is too report it. Any advice on wording?  I figure just stick to the facts, but as someone mentioned, I'm finding it hard to shake the sigma of being a tattler and therefore not being taken seriously.  I like the suggestion of the boss watching the lot one night.  That's something the owner has done before.
you need to get out of the mindset of tattling. it's not. If you saw someone commit a crime, would you not report it? if you found out that someone (even someone in your family) was, let's say, stealing from another person or physically harming another person, wouldn't you do something about it? it's not "tattling" to protect innocent people from the acts of a crazyman.  It's "doing the right thing". And that's just a regular situation of a dangerous driver. but this guy is driving for your company? that makes it a million times worse!

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artk2002

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Re: Report bad driver to the boss?
« Reply #17 on: January 06, 2015, 10:29:20 AM »
There is this stigma against "tattling". That stigma should be limited to only matters that are unrelated to the job. So you wouldn't tell his boss if you saw the driver cheating on his wife or being rude to a waiter or wearing plaid and stripes. You do tell the boss when he is driving dangerously on company time and he is a driver.

Give us a tricky one like driving dangerously on the weekend in his own vehicle or drinking to blackout and fights every night and we can have a debate. This one is a no brainer.

Well, this was after we had clocked out and were going home, so it was not on company time, and he was in his personal vehicle, but we were still on company property for some of it.  I see so far the overwhelming consensus is too report it. Any advice on wording?  I figure just stick to the facts, but as someone mentioned, I'm finding it hard to shake the sigma of being a tattler and therefore not being taken seriously.  I like the suggestion of the boss watching the lot one night.  That's something the owner has done before.
you need to get out of the mindset of tattling. it's not. If you saw someone commit a crime, would you not report it? if you found out that someone (even someone in your family) was, let's say, stealing from another person or physically harming another person, wouldn't you do something about it? it's not "tattling" to protect innocent people from the acts of a crazyman.  It's "doing the right thing". And that's just a regular situation of a dangerous driver. but this guy is driving for your company? that makes it a million times worse!

There's a simple rubric that has always worked for me: "Tattling" is to get someone in trouble; "reporting" is to keep someone safe. It doesn't matter if the reporting gets them in trouble (that may be a natural consequence); the whole point is the reason for doing it.
Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bow lines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.

greencat

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Re: Report bad driver to the boss?
« Reply #18 on: January 06, 2015, 10:33:37 AM »
There is this stigma against "tattling". That stigma should be limited to only matters that are unrelated to the job. So you wouldn't tell his boss if you saw the driver cheating on his wife or being rude to a waiter or wearing plaid and stripes. You do tell the boss when he is driving dangerously on company time and he is a driver.

Give us a tricky one like driving dangerously on the weekend in his own vehicle or drinking to blackout and fights every night and we can have a debate. This one is a no brainer.

Well, this was after we had clocked out and were going home, so it was not on company time, and he was in his personal vehicle, but we were still on company property for some of it.  I see so far the overwhelming consensus is too report it. Any advice on wording?  I figure just stick to the facts, but as someone mentioned, I'm finding it hard to shake the sigma of being a tattler and therefore not being taken seriously.  I like the suggestion of the boss watching the lot one night.  That's something the owner has done before.

Tattling is for kindergartners.  Reporting is for adults in the workforce who need to say something to management about potential problems.  Additionally, I've found that people who call reporting workplace issues "tattling" are often workplace bullies. Report, report, report.

As far as wording - "Boss, I'm concerned about New Guy's driving.  He was speeding through the parking lot and crossing the empty spaces to pass around me because I wasn't going fast enough for his taste when everyone was leaving work, and then yesterday, he tailgated me so closely I couldn't see his headlights from the parking lot exit to (wherever he pulled away).  You know what traffic is like during rush hour, and his driving wouldn't have been safe if we were the only two cars on the road."

JeanFromBNA

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Re: Report bad driver to the boss?
« Reply #19 on: January 06, 2015, 03:09:21 PM »
There is this stigma against "tattling". That stigma should be limited to only matters that are unrelated to the job. So you wouldn't tell his boss if you saw the driver cheating on his wife or being rude to a waiter or wearing plaid and stripes. You do tell the boss when he is driving dangerously on company time and he is a driver.

Give us a tricky one like driving dangerously on the weekend in his own vehicle or drinking to blackout and fights every night and we can have a debate. This one is a no brainer.

Well, this was after we had clocked out and were going home, so it was not on company time, and he was in his personal vehicle, but we were still on company property for some of it.  I see so far the overwhelming consensus is too report it. Any advice on wording?  I figure just stick to the facts, but as someone mentioned, I'm finding it hard to shake the sigma of being a tattler and therefore not being taken seriously.  I like the suggestion of the boss watching the lot one night.  That's something the owner has done before.

Tattling is for kindergartners.  Reporting is for adults in the workforce who need to say something to management about potential problems.  Additionally, I've found that people who call reporting workplace issues "tattling" are often workplace bullies. Report, report, report.

As far as wording - "Boss, I'm concerned about New Guy's driving.  He was speeding through the parking lot and crossing the empty spaces to pass around me because I wasn't going fast enough for his taste when everyone was leaving work, and then yesterday, he tailgated me so closely I couldn't see his headlights from the parking lot exit to (wherever he pulled away).  You know what traffic is like during rush hour, and his driving wouldn't have been safe if we were the only two cars on the road."
I like what Greencat suggested with just a couple of alterations.  Just stick to the facts, and let the boss decide for himself if what you described is safe.

Sun and Shadow

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Re: Report bad driver to the boss?
« Reply #20 on: January 06, 2015, 03:31:32 PM »
I completely agree-report him. And I would say something to him about the tailgating directly. That directly affects your safety and you shouldn't be shy about telling him to never do that again to you (or anyone else, really). When he argues that he wasn't tailgating or that he was in perfect control of his vehicle (which he will!) I would be very firm and tell him that regardless, he is not to follow you as closely again.

I'd be tempted to point out that if he were as good a driver as he may think he is, he'd know that it's impossible to stop a car in less than a car length if you're traveling at highway speeds other than by running into something.  I just wish more drivers kept this in mind. 

His driving is endangering people's lives, including his own, and the company's reputation.  Telling someone is reporting a safety hazard, not tattling.

shortstuff

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Re: Report bad driver to the boss? Updated
« Reply #21 on: January 06, 2015, 05:19:46 PM »
Well, I shouldn't have worried, I had a very brief talk with my boss this afternoon, and summarized what I personally saw: the speeding across the lot before, and last night's tailgating all the way onto the highway.  Boss was already kind of nodding his head along, and said I wasn't the first person to say something about the guy's driving, but that they'd already talked to him and Bossman is surprised it happened again.  I made sure he knew it happened just last night, thanked him for listening, and left. 

Part of why I came here for advice was to more objectively figure out if his driving was that bad, or if my judgement was clouded because I, personally, would never drive like that.  It sounds like he will get another warning, possibly get put under more supervision for possible termination, but I didn't make him drive like that.  And obviously I wasn't the only one who saw and had a problem with it. 


AYFKM

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Re: Report bad driver to the boss?
« Reply #22 on: January 07, 2015, 05:01:29 AM »
All i can say is that i am quite happy i don't work with the majority of posters in this thread.
Any actions taken after work should  not be taken to the employer.
 If you had an issue with the way he drove on public roads you should have spoken to him about that privately. Working in an environment where your every indiscretion is reported to superiors must be extremely stressful and toxic.

Harriet Jones

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Re: Report bad driver to the boss?
« Reply #23 on: January 07, 2015, 06:44:44 AM »
All i can say is that i am quite happy i don't work with the majority of posters in this thread.
Any actions taken after work should  not be taken to the employer.
 If you had an issue with the way he drove on public roads you should have spoken to him about that privately. Working in an environment where your every indiscretion is reported to superiors must be extremely stressful and toxic.

If your ill-advised actions after work still take place on your employer's property, it should affect your job.

Firecat

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Re: Report bad driver to the boss?
« Reply #24 on: January 07, 2015, 07:50:35 AM »
All i can say is that i am quite happy i don't work with the majority of posters in this thread.
Any actions taken after work should  not be taken to the employer.
 If you had an issue with the way he drove on public roads you should have spoken to him about that privately. Working in an environment where your every indiscretion is reported to superiors must be extremely stressful and toxic.

If your ill-advised actions after work still take place on your employer's property, it should affect your job.

Particularly when, as in this case, those actions are specifically related to your job duties. If the OP were, say, wanting to report their child's teacher for having a glass of wine at a restaurant after school hours, that would be inappropriate. But this guy's actions were at least partly still on his employer's property, and driving is part of what the employer is paying him to do.

artk2002

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Re: Report bad driver to the boss?
« Reply #25 on: January 07, 2015, 11:01:29 AM »
All i can say is that i am quite happy i don't work with the majority of posters in this thread.
Any actions taken after work should  not be taken to the employer.
 If you had an issue with the way he drove on public roads you should have spoken to him about that privately. Working in an environment where your every indiscretion is reported to superiors must be extremely stressful and toxic.

It's a fact of life that off-the-job behavior can and will affect your job. Some isn't fair, but much is. People have lost jobs for posting stuff on social media that reflected badly on them or on their employer. Someone who drives for a living can lose their job if they get a ticket in their personal vehicle. Posting "MyCo is run by a bunch of dishonest morons" on your personal blog can get you fired by MyCo.

The idea that you can have some perfect separation of working and personal life is a long-gone myth. If someone shows poor judgment in their personal life, they're going to show it in their working life as well.

That doesn't mean that people should be tattling -- see the definitions above about the difference between "tattling" and "reporting." Mine is: Tattling is intended to get someone into trouble; reporting is intended to keep someone safe.

As others have noted, reporting was particularly appropriate in this case because: 1) The incident started on the employer's property; and 2) It relates to something that the man does as part of his job. If he drives like an idiot in his personal car, he's going to drive like an idiot in the company vehicle.
Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bow lines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.

Eeep!

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Re: Report bad driver to the boss?
« Reply #26 on: January 07, 2015, 11:54:06 AM »
All i can say is that i am quite happy i don't work with the majority of posters in this thread.
Any actions taken after work should  not be taken to the employer.
 If you had an issue with the way he drove on public roads you should have spoken to him about that privately. Working in an environment where your every indiscretion is reported to superiors must be extremely stressful and toxic.

It's a fact of life that off-the-job behavior can and will affect your job. Some isn't fair, but much is. People have lost jobs for posting stuff on social media that reflected badly on them or on their employer. Someone who drives for a living can lose their job if they get a ticket in their personal vehicle. Posting "MyCo is run by a bunch of dishonest morons" on your personal blog can get you fired by MyCo.

The idea that you can have some perfect separation of working and personal life is a long-gone myth. If someone shows poor judgment in their personal life, they're going to show it in their working life as well.

That doesn't mean that people should be tattling -- see the definitions above about the difference between "tattling" and "reporting." Mine is: Tattling is intended to get someone into trouble; reporting is intended to keep someone safe.

As others have noted, reporting was particularly appropriate in this case because: 1) The incident started on the employer's property; and 2) It relates to something that the man does as part of his job. If he drives like an idiot in his personal car, he's going to drive like an idiot in the company vehicle.

I agree with this. Plus, in the instance, the guy knows that having a clean driving record is a requirement for the job.  Having a clean driving record covers all of your driving, not just on the job driving so the bleed over was already obvious.
"Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind." - Dr. Seuss

AYFKM

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Re: Report bad driver to the boss?
« Reply #27 on: January 07, 2015, 01:18:37 PM »
All i can say is that i am quite happy i don't work with the majority of posters in this thread.
Any actions taken after work should  not be taken to the employer.
 If you had an issue with the way he drove on public roads you should have spoken to him about that privately. Working in an environment where your every indiscretion is reported to superiors must be extremely stressful and toxic.

It's a fact of life that off-the-job behavior can and will affect your job. Some isn't fair, but much is. People have lost jobs for posting stuff on social media that reflected badly on them or on their employer. Someone who drives for a living can lose their job if they get a ticket in their personal vehicle. Posting "MyCo is run by a bunch of dishonest morons" on your personal blog can get you fired by MyCo.

The idea that you can have some perfect separation of working and personal life is a long-gone myth. If someone shows poor judgment in their personal life, they're going to show it in their working life as well.

That doesn't mean that people should be tattling -- see the definitions above about the difference between "tattling" and "reporting." Mine is: Tattling is intended to get someone into trouble; reporting is intended to keep someone safe.

As others have noted, reporting was particularly appropriate in this case because: 1) The incident started on the employer's property; and 2) It relates to something that the man does as part of his job. If he drives like an idiot in his personal car, he's going to drive like an idiot in the company vehicle.

I must be reading the Op wrong. I'm sure she said she did not  know if the new co worker was even aware of the rules regarding the speed limits and rules regarding the car park ring road? So as i see it, Everyone has opted to report him to management without even attempting to ascertain if he is aware of the rules regarding the car park . And on some mythical assumption that what he does in his personal life will be carried over to his work.  He requires a clean licence for work . Therefore he must still have a clean licence. To me that indicates a reasonably safe driver considering he spends a lot of time on the road as part of his job. As i said this type of attitude breeds mistrustful and toxic workplaces

greencat

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Re: Report bad driver to the boss?
« Reply #28 on: January 07, 2015, 01:21:41 PM »
All i can say is that i am quite happy i don't work with the majority of posters in this thread.
Any actions taken after work should  not be taken to the employer.
 If you had an issue with the way he drove on public roads you should have spoken to him about that privately. Working in an environment where your every indiscretion is reported to superiors must be extremely stressful and toxic.

It's a fact of life that off-the-job behavior can and will affect your job. Some isn't fair, but much is. People have lost jobs for posting stuff on social media that reflected badly on them or on their employer. Someone who drives for a living can lose their job if they get a ticket in their personal vehicle. Posting "MyCo is run by a bunch of dishonest morons" on your personal blog can get you fired by MyCo.

The idea that you can have some perfect separation of working and personal life is a long-gone myth. If someone shows poor judgment in their personal life, they're going to show it in their working life as well.

That doesn't mean that people should be tattling -- see the definitions above about the difference between "tattling" and "reporting." Mine is: Tattling is intended to get someone into trouble; reporting is intended to keep someone safe.

As others have noted, reporting was particularly appropriate in this case because: 1) The incident started on the employer's property; and 2) It relates to something that the man does as part of his job. If he drives like an idiot in his personal car, he's going to drive like an idiot in the company vehicle.

I must be reading the Op wrong. I'm sure she said she did not  know if the new co worker was even aware of the rules regarding the speed limits and rules regarding the car park ring road? So as i see it, Everyone has opted to report him to management without even attempting to ascertain if he is aware of the rules regarding the car park . And on some mythical assumption that what he does in his personal life will be carried over to his work.  He requires a clean licence for work . Therefore he must still have a clean licence. To me that indicates a reasonably safe driver considering he spends a lot of time on the road as part of his job. As i said this type of attitude breeds mistrustful and toxic workplaces

The OP did not report the initial incident to management until after the second; however, it is a generally acknowledged rule of the road that you don't drive through parking spaces in a parking lot, especially not to pass another car!  The second incident clearly demonstrates that he is not a safe driver. Safe drivers don't tailgate.  Period.

Harriet Jones

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Re: Report bad driver to the boss?
« Reply #29 on: January 07, 2015, 01:22:06 PM »
I'm not seeing the toxicity here - he's supposed to drive for his job and is not following the 'rules of the road' even in the parking lot of his employer.  If he has a driver's license, he should at least know those, even if he's not familiar with the speed limit on his employer's road.