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Author Topic: The sneeze and wipe  (Read 8940 times)

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Secret

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The sneeze and wipe
« on: January 26, 2015, 08:47:54 PM »

My niece (7) and my daughter (5) were playing Lego before a family dinner. I watched niece sneeze into the palm of her hand and wipe it on her pants.  Now we were just at their house the weekend before and contracted gastroenteritis this past week, so I was already on high germ alert.


Do you tell niece to wash her hands?  The entire family is in the living room when this happens.  I don't know if the parents saw it or not.  But it was blatant and obvious, niece wasn't trying to hide it or anything. 

Promise

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Re: The sneeze and wipe
« Reply #1 on: January 26, 2015, 08:54:01 PM »
I think I would say, "Hey *niece* I learned a great thing to do if I have to sneeze." I then pretend to sneeze into my elbow. Then I would say, "This way you don't get those messy germs on your hands." 

My mom still sneezes into her hand. I don't know why people do this and why they just don't sneeze into their clothes, which get washed. But this is what I taught all of my preschoolers when I was a preschool teacher. To this day I see people sneeze into their hands. Why sneezing into the elbow isn't common is beyond me.

browzer11

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Re: The sneeze and wipe
« Reply #2 on: January 26, 2015, 09:01:36 PM »
I don't understand.

What are the benefits of sneezing into your elbow?

PastryGoddess

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Re: The sneeze and wipe
« Reply #3 on: January 26, 2015, 10:13:32 PM »
I don't understand.

What are the benefits of sneezing into your elbow?

To me it's that those germs aren't on your hand that you are using to touch stuff with.  Especially since very few people go and wash their hands after sneezing into them. 

browzer11

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Re: The sneeze and wipe
« Reply #4 on: January 26, 2015, 10:48:57 PM »
When you sneeze into your hands, most of the saliva and mucous is contained in your hands.

When you sneeze into your elbow, saliva and mucous is splattered everywhere. 

Personally, I have never seen anyone sneeze into their elbow.

To each, his own, I guess.

doodlemor

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Re: The sneeze and wipe
« Reply #5 on: January 26, 2015, 11:00:22 PM »
I would have gone to her, handed her a tissue, and told her to wipe her hands and face.  When that was done I would have said something like, "Sweetie, you need to go and wash your hands now."  If her parents looked to see what was happening, or asked, I would just have given a little smile and told them that she had sneezed into her hands.  I really think that any reasonable person would not want their child walking around with snot on their hands.

FauxFoodist

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Re: The sneeze and wipe
« Reply #6 on: January 27, 2015, 12:52:12 AM »
I've never seen anyone sneeze into their elbows, and I work in a hospital.  I've heard of people coughing into their elbows.  I sneeze into my hands all the time; it helps contain my sneeze.  I then, however, use anti-bacterial foam on my hands (which I keep at my desk all the time).

MariaE

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Re: The sneeze and wipe
« Reply #7 on: January 27, 2015, 01:44:06 AM »
I often sneeze into my elbow, but only when it's a "cough-sneeze" (i.e. lots of air, little-to-no mucus/saliva).
If it's a proper sneeze and I can't get to a tissue in time, I sneeze into my hands so I can wash them thoroughly afterwards.
 
Dane by birth, Kiwi by choice

Margo

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Re: The sneeze and wipe
« Reply #8 on: January 27, 2015, 04:48:25 AM »
I often sneeze into my elbow, but only when it's a "cough-sneeze" (i.e. lots of air, little-to-no mucus/saliva).
If it's a proper sneeze and I can't get to a tissue in time, I sneeze into my hands so I can wash them thoroughly afterwards.

yes, I think it would pretty gross to sneeze into clothing, as while clothing is washable, it is rarely practical to wash it *right then*, whereas it's generally much easier to wash your hands. Even if it is mostly air, I think it is less likely to be contained in an elbow..

Of course, better still is to get in the habit of carrying a handkerchief or paper tissues and then you can use those!

Regarding the niece, I think you'd be fine to give her a paper tissue to use and say something like "oops, well done for covering your nose when you sneezed - lets go wash your hands, and here are the tissues so you can use one if you need to sneeze again"

I don;t think it is rude to speak to a young child in your home in that way, even with the parents near by, given that it's a small thing which they may very easily have missed.

jolyan

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Re: The sneeze and wipe
« Reply #9 on: January 27, 2015, 05:00:26 AM »
The CDC recommends that you sneeze into your elbow if you don't have a tissue handy.

Katana_Geldar

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Re: The sneeze and wipe
« Reply #10 on: January 27, 2015, 05:05:24 AM »
I sneezed into my elbow when I worked in food service and couldn't get out of sight in time. It saved customers watch me sneeze in my hands.

Awestruck Shmuck

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Re: The sneeze and wipe
« Reply #11 on: January 27, 2015, 05:17:59 AM »



Regarding the niece, I think you'd be fine to give her a paper tissue to use and say something like "oops, well done for covering your nose when you sneezed - lets go wash your hands, and here are the tissues so you can use one if you need to sneeze again"

I don;t think it is rude to speak to a young child in your home in that way, even with the parents near by, given that it's a small thing which they may very easily have missed.

I think I pruned the quote tree badly, but I agree with the above. I don't have kids, but when my nephews/nieces/god daughters have done this ( or similar), I have no problems passing a tissue/wipe and/or carting them off to the bathroom to wash their hands - the parents don't tend to mind, I think they enjoy having someone else clean up the occasional grotty kid!! ;D

bopper

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Re: The sneeze and wipe
« Reply #12 on: January 27, 2015, 07:49:29 AM »
Yes, it is okay to say to niece "Good thing you covered your sneeze!  Now let's go wash your hands."

Secret

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Re: The sneeze and wipe
« Reply #13 on: January 27, 2015, 07:50:17 AM »
The kids at school are now taught to "hug themselves tightly" when sneezing and coughing. It is taught starting in kindergarden.  Basically - cough into your elbow.  The conventional wisdom here is that when you sneeze into your hands, you are then going to touch the door knob, pencils and all other things and spread the germs much quicker than sneezing into your elbow.

Yvaine

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Re: The sneeze and wipe
« Reply #14 on: January 27, 2015, 07:57:37 AM »
I often sneeze into my elbow, but only when it's a "cough-sneeze" (i.e. lots of air, little-to-no mucus/saliva).
If it's a proper sneeze and I can't get to a tissue in time, I sneeze into my hands so I can wash them thoroughly afterwards.

yes, I think it would pretty gross to sneeze into clothing, as while clothing is washable, it is rarely practical to wash it *right then*, whereas it's generally much easier to wash your hands.


Yeah, this is what bugs me about it, especially as someone who will rewear dressy clothes a few times before washing if I didn't do anything strenuous in them. I sneeze into my elbow? That blouse is now dirty and I've got to wash it before wearing it again, thus putting more wear and tear on it. Plus I'm going around all day thinking about my dirty elbow. This may be somewhat obsessive of me! Whereas I can wash my hands right away. I'm the same way about, say, wearing winter gloves while doing gross chores. If I have to clean up dog poo in the winter, I'll take off my gloves first, because I can wash my hands right away in the sink, but if I dirtied my gloves, I'd have to run them through the wash to feel like they were really clean.

That said, it definitely is the CDC guideline currently, so I've accepted it as a thing.