News: IT'S THE 2ND ANNUAL GUATEMALA LIBRARY PROJECT BOOK DRIVE!    LOOKING FOR DONATIONS OF SCIENCE BOOKS THIS YEAR.    Check it out in the "Extending the Hand of Kindness" folder or here: http://www.etiquettehell.com/smf/index.php?topic=139832.msg3372084#msg3372084   

  • November 24, 2017, 03:45:46 AM

Login with username, password and session length

Author Topic: Do you run an orphanage?  (Read 31489 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

ladyknight1

  • Member
  • Posts: 11908
  • Not all those who wander are lost
Re: Do you run an orphanage?
« Reply #45 on: February 18, 2015, 09:37:03 AM »
I've been noticing more people buying 10+ lbs of carrots/celery/kale for juicing.
ďAll that is gold does not glitter, Not all those who wander are lost; The old that is strong does not wither, Deep roots are not reached by the frost."
-J.R.R Tolkien

Lynn2000

  • Member
  • Posts: 8322
Re: Do you run an orphanage?
« Reply #46 on: February 18, 2015, 10:11:31 AM »
In many of the stories here I donít think the people who made remarks about purchases deserved an answer.

Iím making out a grocery list right now.  If a stranger were to question my purchases or tell me X wasnít good for me, Iíd give them a blank stare and keep walking.  Thereís no reason whatsoever to give them an explanation or to even acknowledge rude, nosey comments and questions - even in a joking way.

POD! I don't think I've ever been questioned, but I hope I would react appropriately--polite of course, but not bothering to give a reason to someone who is being rude or insulting.

I almost never notice what anyone else is buying. Probably something like the Radish Man would stand out, but I don't recall anything like that. And I would definitely keep whatever fleeting thought I might have to myself! The most common thing I think is, "I'm so glad I don't have that many groceries, I would really hate to carry them all." (Transporting the groceries from the store to my apartment is the number one thing I hate about grocery shopping!)
~Lynn2000

sulygirl

  • Member
  • Posts: 64
Re: Do you run an orphanage?
« Reply #47 on: February 19, 2015, 12:48:29 PM »
In many of the stories here I donít think the people who made remarks about purchases deserved an answer.

Iím making out a grocery list right now.  If a stranger were to question my purchases or tell me X wasnít good for me, Iíd give them a blank stare and keep walking.  Thereís no reason whatsoever to give them an explanation or to even acknowledge rude, nosey comments and questions - even in a joking way.

POD! I don't think I've ever been questioned, but I hope I would react appropriately--polite of course, but not bothering to give a reason to someone who is being rude or insulting.

I almost never notice what anyone else is buying. Probably something like the Radish Man would stand out, but I don't recall anything like that. And I would definitely keep whatever fleeting thought I might have to myself! The most common thing I think is, "I'm so glad I don't have that many groceries, I would really hate to carry them all." (Transporting the groceries from the store to my apartment is the number one thing I hate about grocery shopping!)

I'm with you.  I never want to remark on anything anyone is buying because I am focused on what I need to get.  Because I have to cart groceries up the stairs myself so I'm more likely to notice poor bagging choices than I am what someone has in their cart!  It's a wonder I remember the reusable bags I have most days!  I can't believe people have the audacity to talk to you about the food you are purchasing or eating when they don't know you.  I, myself, buy a lot of eggs because I eat a lot of eggs.  One checkout girl asked me how I could eat so many "dang gross eggs" and I was like, "Huh?  I love eggs, personally". I  now realize I should have ignored the rude comment.  I'm either riding a bike or lifting weights so I need the protein!

One time, my mother and I were in Union Station in DC eating quiche and a lady came up and said, "That looks SO gross.  Is it any good?"  we were in a patio of sorts, so she actually talked to us over the barrier.  15 year old me was stunned and confused.  My mother was like, "Can I help you?" and the lady got super offended and said, "I wasn't being rude".  My mother let it go as she walked off but said under her breath "like heck you weren't, lady".  Some people are nuts.



NFPwife

  • Member
  • Posts: 1926
Re: Do you run an orphanage?
« Reply #48 on: February 19, 2015, 12:53:46 PM »
In many of the stories here I donít think the people who made remarks about purchases deserved an answer.

Iím making out a grocery list right now.  If a stranger were to question my purchases or tell me X wasnít good for me, Iíd give them a blank stare and keep walking.  Thereís no reason whatsoever to give them an explanation or to even acknowledge rude, nosey comments and questions - even in a joking way.

POD! I don't think I've ever been questioned, but I hope I would react appropriately--polite of course, but not bothering to give a reason to someone who is being rude or insulting.

I almost never notice what anyone else is buying. Probably something like the Radish Man would stand out, but I don't recall anything like that. And I would definitely keep whatever fleeting thought I might have to myself! The most common thing I think is, "I'm so glad I don't have that many groceries, I would really hate to carry them all." (Transporting the groceries from the store to my apartment is the number one thing I hate about grocery shopping!)

I'm with you.  I never want to remark on anything anyone is buying because I am focused on what I need to get.  Because I have to cart groceries up the stairs myself so I'm more likely to notice poor bagging choices than I am what someone has in their cart!  It's a wonder I remember the reusable bags I have most days!  I can't believe people have the audacity to talk to you about the food you are purchasing or eating when they don't know you.  I, myself, buy a lot of eggs because I eat a lot of eggs.  One checkout girl asked me how I could eat so many "dang gross eggs" and I was like, "Huh?  I love eggs, personally". I  now realize I should have ignored the rude comment.  I'm either riding a bike or lifting weights so I need the protein!

One time, my mother and I were in Union Station in DC eating quiche and a lady came up and said, "That looks SO gross.  Is it any good?"  we were in a patio of sorts, so she actually talked to us over the barrier.  15 year old me was stunned and confused.  My mother was like, "Can I help you?" and the lady got super offended and said, "I wasn't being rude".  My mother let it go as she walked off but said under her breath "like heck you weren't, lady".  Some people are nuts.




I think someone needs her definition of rude reset! I think it's rude for a passerby to engage a patio diner, period. Nevermind what she said!

I agree with you on the egg protein. It's the most bioavailable and inexpensive protein. My husband does the three day thing once every few months, and  eats a lot of eggs in general. Our grocery bill would easily triple if he was getting that much protein from any other source.

sulygirl

  • Member
  • Posts: 64
Re: Do you run an orphanage?
« Reply #49 on: February 19, 2015, 01:30:33 PM »
I'm allergic to nuts and peanuts.  So, if I wasn't big into eggs, I would have some issues haha.  Finding protein powder that is not cross-contaminated or lacks almonds is hard, too!  I stick to "safe" protein post-weight lift and eggs and yogurt.  I try to only eat meat 4-5x's a week because we buy more "ethical" meats and it costs a fortune otherwise.

MommyPenguin

  • Member
  • Posts: 4130
    • My blog!
Re: Do you run an orphanage?
« Reply #50 on: February 19, 2015, 01:53:15 PM »
I don't even need to be buying food, just existing in public with my kids, and people will stare at the crowd of them in shock, then ask me, "Are they *all* yours?" or "Do you run a daycare?"  I haven't gotten the orphanage one yet, although I might if the kids keep singing songs from "Annie," especially "It's a Hard-Knock Life."  Conversely, nobody's ever commented on my very full cart at the grocery store or warehouse club.  But then, I've only bought 3 gallons of milk at a time, not 14, and we have our own chickens and so don't need eggs.  :)

We have several friends with large families and when someone asks if they are all theirs one husband looks and the brood and says, "Crap! Where'd that one come from?!" Other friends have T-shirts with answers to all the "standard" questions and they wear them to amusement parks.

On the eggs - I said to my DH that we should get a couple chickens and he said, "How would that help? They'd only last a week." I was laughing and yelling "For eggs! You're not eating the chickens!"

There's an old joke about a young hen asking an old hen about her age & being a bit shocked that the "old" hen is three times the age of the younger one.

A comment along the lines of "how did you manage to live so long" is made by the young hen.

The old hen shrugs and says "an egg a day keeps the axe away"...

Like this?  :)
Emily is 10 years old!  1/07
Jenny is 8 years old!  10/08
Charlotte is 7 years old!  8/10
Megan is 4 years old!  10/12
Lydia is 2 years old!  12/14
Baby Charlie expected 9/17

2littlemonkeys

  • Member
  • Posts: 2888
Re: Do you run an orphanage?
« Reply #51 on: February 19, 2015, 04:05:22 PM »
I have a relative who always notices what is in everyone else's cart too and it baffles me. I am usually too focused on my list and getting the heck out of there to care what anyone else is buying. 

I was on another forum a while ago and there was a post from a 'concerned' shopper.  See, she was at the grocery store and this person was buying a ton of flour (or sugar or something typically used in baking.  I can't recall now.)  But the shopper was a guy and was burly and 'covered in tattoos.'   So the OP wanted to know he could have POSSIBLY needed all of that for.  Drugs?  It had to be drugs.  Also, should she have said something to the store manager?

Yes.  Because he couldn't possibly need it for...say...baking.   ::)

sulygirl

  • Member
  • Posts: 64
Re: Do you run an orphanage?
« Reply #52 on: February 19, 2015, 04:16:13 PM »
I have a relative who always notices what is in everyone else's cart too and it baffles me. I am usually too focused on my list and getting the heck out of there to care what anyone else is buying. 

I was on another forum a while ago and there was a post from a 'concerned' shopper.  See, she was at the grocery store and this person was buying a ton of flour (or sugar or something typically used in baking.  I can't recall now.)  But the shopper was a guy and was burly and 'covered in tattoos.'   So the OP wanted to know he could have POSSIBLY needed all of that for.  Drugs?  It had to be drugs.  Also, should she have said something to the store manager?

Yes.  Because he couldn't possibly need it for...say...baking.   ::)
;D :o  People are so ridiculous!  That's something my uptight grandmother would say.  She once went on a tirade about a guy who got "his whole face tattoo'ed.  Now, this guy has never materialized so I doubt he really existed but she went on and on about how awful he must be and how no one should let him around their children when my sister announced, "I have a tattoo behind my ear.  I teach people's children.  Should they be afraid?"  She finally shut up.  Grandma is a very annoying busybody.  She would be the type to comment on people's carts FOR SURE.

Elfmama

  • Member
  • Posts: 4595
  • Derailing threads since 2001!
Re: Do you run an orphanage?
« Reply #53 on: February 19, 2015, 04:34:24 PM »
I remember going grocery shopping with my mom at the BX (base exchange - on an Air Force Base).  As soon as we entered the BX, my job was to take an empty cart and go put in 14 half gallons containters of milk (why yes, I had an older brother).  Nobody ever blinked an eye.
Just out of curiosity, why 14 half-gallons instead of 7 gallon jugs?  (And I think you mean the commissary.  Commissary sells food, BX sells clothes and housewares and electronics, like Walmart.)
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~
Common sense is not a gift, but a curse.  Because then
you have to deal with all the people who don't have it.
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~

Benni

  • Member
  • Posts: 557
Re: Do you run an orphanage?
« Reply #54 on: February 19, 2015, 05:07:15 PM »
I remember going grocery shopping with my mom at the BX (base exchange - on an Air Force Base).  As soon as we entered the BX, my job was to take an empty cart and go put in 14 half gallons containters of milk (why yes, I had an older brother).  Nobody ever blinked an eye.
Just out of curiosity, why 14 half-gallons instead of 7 gallon jugs?  (And I think you mean the commissary.  Commissary sells food, BX sells clothes and housewares and electronics, like Walmart.)

When I was a child and we would go to the PX (Post Exchange) they sold everything out of one warehouse.  That included clothing and food.  Back in the '60s we bought milk in the 1/2 gallon because they did not sell it in gallon jugs.  This was before the dinosaurs roamed the earth and plastic gallon jugs were not yet invented for milk.

#borecore

  • Member
  • Posts: 5173
  • Extreme normcore
Re: Do you run an orphanage?
« Reply #55 on: February 19, 2015, 05:23:24 PM »
I have a relative who always notices what is in everyone else's cart too and it baffles me. I am usually too focused on my list and getting the heck out of there to care what anyone else is buying. 

I was on another forum a while ago and there was a post from a 'concerned' shopper.  See, she was at the grocery store and this person was buying a ton of flour (or sugar or something typically used in baking.  I can't recall now.)  But the shopper was a guy and was burly and 'covered in tattoos.'   So the OP wanted to know he could have POSSIBLY needed all of that for.  Drugs?  It had to be drugs.  Also, should she have said something to the store manager?

Yes.  Because he couldn't possibly need it for...say...baking.   ::)
;D :o  People are so ridiculous!  That's something my uptight grandmother would say.  She once went on a tirade about a guy who got "his whole face tattoo'ed.  Now, this guy has never materialized so I doubt he really existed but she went on and on about how awful he must be and how no one should let him around their children when my sister announced, "I have a tattoo behind my ear.  I teach people's children.  Should they be afraid?"  She finally shut up.  Grandma is a very annoying busybody.  She would be the type to comment on people's carts FOR SURE.

Reminds me of my paternal grandfather. I'll never forget the time we went to Applebee's and he went ON and ON about the disgusting, immoral person our waiter must be because of his tattoos and piercings. I was about 13, and I waited till the server was back in earshot and said, "I think there's nothing wrong with any of that. What, am I immoral because I have 3 earrings?" He had no answer.

Dazi

  • like the flower
  • Member
  • Posts: 5606
Re: Do you run an orphanage?
« Reply #56 on: February 19, 2015, 05:27:34 PM »
My favorite yogurt is the 10% milk-fat Cabot plain Greek Yogurt. It is delicious.  ;D

At least once every few weeks I have someone point out to me that I picked up the "wrong one"  to put in my cart.  Because, obviously, I'm a woman and meant to get the low-fat or fat free (revolting stuff)...I couldn't possibly want the super high fat one  ::) They look super confused when I cheerily let them know that I really meant to get the full fat version.

Funny thing is, my DH is the one the prefers the 2% one.  :P

ETA: Popsicles.  Apparently adults cannot purchase popsicles unless they have children. Is this some kind of crazy rule I've never heard of?
« Last Edit: February 19, 2015, 05:29:17 PM by Dazi »
Meditate. Live purely. Quiet the mind. Do your work with mastery. Like the moon, come out from behind the clouds! Shine. ---Gautama Buddah





wheeitsme

  • Member
  • Posts: 3821
Re: Do you run an orphanage?
« Reply #57 on: February 19, 2015, 05:40:37 PM »
I remember going grocery shopping with my mom at the BX (base exchange - on an Air Force Base).  As soon as we entered the BX, my job was to take an empty cart and go put in 14 half gallons containters of milk (why yes, I had an older brother).  Nobody ever blinked an eye.
Just out of curiosity, why 14 half-gallons instead of 7 gallon jugs?  (And I think you mean the commissary.  Commissary sells food, BX sells clothes and housewares and electronics, like Walmart.)

When I was a child and we would go to the PX (Post Exchange) they sold everything out of one warehouse.  That included clothing and food.  Back in the '60s we bought milk in the 1/2 gallon because they did not sell it in gallon jugs.  This was before the dinosaurs roamed the earth and plastic gallon jugs were not yet invented for milk.

LOL.  Yes.  14 half gallon cartons, not jugs.  And since I am old, too, now that I'm really trying to remember, at some bases it was called the BX and at some the commissary.  I think some bases had the one warehouse thing, and some didn't.  I think as a kid it was just easier to always call it the BX no matter which base.  ;)

lakey

  • Member
  • Posts: 967
Re: Do you run an orphanage?
« Reply #58 on: February 19, 2015, 06:23:37 PM »
I was in a restaurant once salting my pork chop when a woman at a nearby table said, "Salt is the worst thing for you." I didn't bother telling her that:
1. It was none of her business.
2. I actually had low to good blood pressure, so a little salt wasn't a health issue for me.

Danika

  • Member
  • Posts: 2737
Re: Do you run an orphanage?
« Reply #59 on: February 19, 2015, 11:58:35 PM »
I was in a restaurant once salting my pork chop when a woman at a nearby table said, "Salt is the worst thing for you." I didn't bother telling her that:
1. It was none of her business.
2. I actually had low to good blood pressure, so a little salt wasn't a health issue for me.

I get annoyed by people who assume things are either good or bad. I rarely eat salt or many salty foods. If I'm adding salt, it's probably good for me at that point.

I get annoyed when someone's trying to get you to try a new energy drink or vitamin water. They say "It has Vitamin B6 in it. B6 is good for you." It might be for people whose bodies can metabolize man-made vitamins. I have constant pain from permanent nerve damage. It's likely from Vitamin B6 toxicity nearly a decade ago (taking prenatal vitamins). Man-made Vitamin B6 is definitely not good for me. But I don't want to get on a soap box in the middle of the grocery store where they're handing out freebies. So I just say "No thanks" and keep walking.