News: IT'S THE 2ND ANNUAL GUATEMALA LIBRARY PROJECT BOOK DRIVE!    LOOKING FOR DONATIONS OF SCIENCE BOOKS THIS YEAR.    Check it out in the "Extending the Hand of Kindness" folder or here: http://www.etiquettehell.com/smf/index.php?topic=139832.msg3372084#msg3372084   

  • November 23, 2017, 09:18:07 AM

Login with username, password and session length

Author Topic: 50/50 Draws  (Read 16752 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Kiwipinball

  • Member
  • Posts: 1458
Re: 50/50 Draws
« Reply #15 on: June 29, 2015, 01:45:02 PM »
Quote
This has been discussed here a number of times.

Whoops, sorry!  I should have searched for a similar topic before I opened this one.

I'm glad I'm not the only one who finds this annoying.  I enter draws and contests with the idea that I might win something.   If I'm going to be pressured into giving  up my prize, I'm just not going to enter anymore, which is the complete opposite of what the fundraiser had in mind.

There was another (possible) issue at the same social.  There were a lot of really nice prizes in the silent auction.  Four or five people won more than once.   Would it have been polite of them to give up their additional prizes?  (I didn't win anything, but I have to admit - if I had won more than one prize, I probably would've kept everything.  Luck of the draw, and all that.)

I'm confused about what you mean by "silent auction" - I have seen the term used for items that people can bid on, putting down the highest price they are willing to donate to "win" the item - I don't see how someone could give up if they won such an auction.  If you mean the kind of fundraiser where you buy raffle tickets and throw them in a basket to win an item, then I can see how someone could decline the prize but I don't really think they should feel obligated to do so.

Yes, exactly. That's how I interpret silent auction - if the person is paying for their items, I see nothing wrong with them doing that. I frequently bid on multiple items (and then panic and start praying for people to outbid me on at least some of the auctions - I need to be more careful!). If someone seemed crushed about "losing" I might offer them the opportunity to buy it (at the same price I bid).

If it's a raffle, that's a little different, but it's also luck of the draw so I don't think anyone should feel obligated to decline a prize. I was at a bridal shower where I won two games in a row and I politely declined the 2nd prize with some joke about my winning (can't remember what) because it did feel awkward to win twice.

Shalamar

  • Member
  • Posts: 311
Re: 50/50 Draws
« Reply #16 on: June 29, 2015, 01:51:27 PM »
Quote
If you mean the kind of fundraiser where you buy raffle tickets and throw them in a basket to win an item

Yup, that's what I mean.  That's what we call "silent auctions" where I live.

Quote
then I can see how someone could decline the prize but I don't really think they should feel obligated to do so.

That's how I feel.  The only time I've ever given up a prize at a social was when my husband and I won three prizes and had been picked to win a fourth.  I thought "Enough is enough!" and "lost" my winning ticket.  :)

HannahGrace

  • Member
  • Posts: 1282
Re: 50/50 Draws
« Reply #17 on: June 29, 2015, 01:54:47 PM »
Quote
If you mean the kind of fundraiser where you buy raffle tickets and throw them in a basket to win an item

Yup, that's what I mean.  That's what we call "silent auctions" where I live.

Quote
then I can see how someone could decline the prize but I don't really think they should feel obligated to do so.

That's how I feel.  The only time I've ever given up a prize at a social was when my husband and I won three prizes and had been picked to win a fourth.  I thought "Enough is enough!" and "lost" my winning ticket.  :)

We agree then :) We call that just a "raffle" here.  I've had a couple of occasions where I won more than once, but it's because I bought a ton of tickets and put all my eggs/tickets in two baskets, so I felt OK about keeping the prizes.  If I had tossed a few in other baskets and started winning a bunch, I'd probably do the same thing you did.

rose red

  • Member
  • Posts: 9549
Re: 50/50 Draws
« Reply #18 on: June 29, 2015, 02:11:59 PM »
We call putting tickets into different baskets a "raffle" too. To me, a silent auction is when there's a table full of prizes and you write your name and dollar amount on the piece of paper in front of the thing you are bidding for. Start low and bid again with a higher amount (until you reach your limit) if someone else comes along and upped your original bid. Like:

Diamond Ring
Joan Smith - $100
Diane Kelly - $125
Joan Smith - $150
Bob James - $200
Joan Smith -$210
etc.

Peppergirl

  • Member
  • Posts: 1362
Re: 50/50 Draws
« Reply #19 on: June 29, 2015, 08:33:56 PM »
Rude and against the spirit of a true 50/50 split.  It's still generally pure profit (the 50 percent cut) for the organization, right?

I won one about 6 months ago and I gave half of my half back, only because I wanted to.  No one made me feel obligated and, in fact, acted like I walked on water for doing it!  Granted, we were only talking about $60.00 (I gave $30 back), but still.


mime

  • Member
  • Posts: 1824
Re: 50/50 Draws
« Reply #20 on: June 30, 2015, 09:48:27 AM »
I've never heard of a 50/50 Draw before, so I suppose if I entered I would have believed the claim, and assumed that I could win $100 (or whatever amount).

If I won and was pressured to give away my money, I'm sure I would have given up the winnings and just treated it in my mind as "I entered, but didn't win". I'd also be reluctant to support that organization again.

It would help for me to know, even in retrospect, that this was considered normal and that the claim of winning was just a gimmick.


Sophia

  • Member
  • Posts: 12442
  • xi
Re: 50/50 Draws
« Reply #21 on: June 30, 2015, 11:11:28 AM »
I won $220 in a 50/50 raffle, I'd invite anyone who tried to pressure me and particularly anyone who boo'ed into each putting up $220 themselves first.  Because, really, at the point that you won, the money was yours. 

Bobbie

  • Member
  • Posts: 200
Re: 50/50 Draws
« Reply #22 on: June 30, 2015, 11:59:10 AM »
At fundraisers, I have run the deck of cards drawing.  I start with a deck of cards and sell a card for $5 each.  I tear the card in half, keep one half give the other to the donor.  I can sell as many decks as people will buy.  Sometimes the winnings get to $250-300 range. I would never expect the winner to give back any or a portion of their winnings. Its a fun drawing and I would be disappointed if the event organizer asked me to pressure the winner to give back any of their winnings. 

PastryGoddess

  • Member
  • Posts: 6374
Re: 50/50 Draws
« Reply #23 on: June 30, 2015, 04:18:36 PM »
At our annual fundraiser, the 50/50 raffle pot can get up to a few thousand dollars.  While we would appreciate if people donate it back, we certainly don't put them on the spot to do so. 

Last year I think the split was $1400 or so.  A service member stationed in polar bear land won it.  You bet he kept all of it. 

Bottlecaps

  • Member
  • Posts: 261
  • She boxed her shadow and she won.
Re: 50/50 Draws
« Reply #24 on: June 30, 2015, 08:07:18 PM »
If I were to win a 50/50 raffle, I most likely would not donate the money back. I entered because it's for a good cause and I have a chance at getting something out of it too. If I didn't care to get something out of it, for whatever reason, I'd just outright donate to the good cause without entering the raffle.

How rude that some organizers feel the need to put people on the spot like that! They should be ashamed of themselves. Maybe that person could use the money just as much as the organization could. They shouldn't be made to feel bad if they decide to keep their rightful winnings.
"Some of the most wonderful people are the ones who don't fit into boxes." -Tori Amos


sammycat

  • Member
  • Posts: 7934
Re: 50/50 Draws
« Reply #25 on: June 30, 2015, 08:20:05 PM »
Personally, I find it extremely rude and unfair. If you're going to call something a "50/50 Draw," then you need to stick to that.  Why should I contribute money for the chance to win nothing? If you want me to just donate to someone, then ask that way; don't dress it up as something else.

I think it's awful. Just ask for donations without this nonsense of a fake raffle. Food and drinks are enough for a fundraiser without , you know, humiliating donors. They could raffle off baked goods or dollar store items just for fun, but this just leaves a bad taste in my mouth.

I enter draws and contests with the idea that I might win something.   If I'm going to be pressured into giving  up my prize, I'm just not going to enter anymore, which is the complete opposite of what the fundraiser had in mind.

I agree with these comments. 

I'd never heard of a 50/50 raffle prior to ehell (is it a regional thing? Only in the US? I've never come across one in Australia).

If one was suddenly spring on me, I'd be completely confused as to why I was being asked/expected/demanded to give my prize away. In any event, I wouldn't do it; I won the prize fair and square, so I wouldn't be parting with the money.

Margo

  • Member
  • Posts: 2153
Re: 50/50 Draws
« Reply #26 on: July 01, 2015, 07:58:20 AM »
I agree that it is rude and inappropriat. Particualrly where it is a straight 'draw'/.

The only time I have seen something similar is a a quiz night which is run by a club. You pay to enter a team, 50% of the entry fees go to the club and the other 50% go to provide prizes for the teams which come first, 2nd and 3rd.

There is a tradition that people donate their prizes back to a charity supported by (and related to the purpose of) the club.

But I think that  that is slightly different to the OPs situation in that:
- you get the fun of doing the quiz for your entry money, it isn't something for nothing
- it's a small even and you enter by team, so the amounts are  low - I think when we one our 'prize' was 30, between 5 of us
- the event is at a club meeting so everyone who attends is either a member of the club, or a guest of a member, so they know the tradition (I was the guest of my sister and BIL, and they told me, for instance)
- no-one was pressured to hand over their prize. The charity boxes were no the bar next to where the quizmaster was sitting, and prizewinners went up, got their money, picked a box and put it in and were thanked, but there was no request or  demand.

zyrs

  • Member
  • Posts: 2034
  • spiffily male.
Re: 50/50 Draws
« Reply #27 on: July 02, 2015, 01:12:21 AM »
Anyway, the 50/50/draw was held, and the happy winner was told that his half of the money was $220.  Then, the person with the microphone not-so-subtly suggested that the winner donate his half to the cause.

This is why I stopped buying 50/50 raffle tickets from one organization and then just stopped bothering to go to any more of their events.  Just don't bother with the raffle tickets if you aren't going to let the winners enjoy winning.

Lula

  • Member
  • Posts: 258
Re: 50/50 Draws
« Reply #28 on: July 03, 2015, 09:52:48 AM »
Not only is it rude to put the winner on the spot like that, but if it comes to be expected that the winner will always give up all or most of his or her prize, where's the incentive for participating in the 50/50 at all?  Whether you like this bit of human nature or not, people are more likely to invest in a cause when there's at least potentially something in it for them.

NFPwife

  • Member
  • Posts: 1926
Re: 50/50 Draws
« Reply #29 on: July 03, 2015, 10:08:02 AM »
Not only is it rude to put the winner on the spot like that, but if it comes to be expected that the winner will always give up all or most of his or her prize, where's the incentive for participating in the 50/50 at all?  Whether you like this bit of human nature or not, people are more likely to invest in a cause when there's at least potentially something in it for them.

That's completely true. At events were I think there will be pressure to give back my share of a 50/50 or, as we call them, "half the take," I don't even buy a ticket. I'll do the basket raffles or the silent auction, but not the 50/50.

The couple who was booed at an event was wealthy and everyone knew they were wealthy, it had happened in a "public" way. The half of the 50/50 was about $1500. They didn't donate any of it back and several members of the crowd started yelling that they didn't need it and should give it all back. Then the rest of the crowd caught on and started booing. This couple had already made major contributions to the event but the crowd didn't know that. (I know the organizer. She told me the story.) The organizer was a little disappointed they didn't give anything back (I was surprised by her statement) but she was very embarrassed that the crowd booed then. Her emcee had not made a request for any of the cash.