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Author Topic: Controversial food choices, is it worth it?  (Read 27471 times)

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TeamBhakta

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Re: Controversial food choices, is it worth it?
« Reply #15 on: December 30, 2015, 10:02:30 PM »
I don't have a problem with the menu. Although I have a bone to pick with her saying:
"but I hope that having a ‘healthy’ wedding showsof  people that healthy living can be so simple"

I don't know if she's referring to her own guests, or to her cookbook audience. But as a wedding guest, I would dislike the idea that the host thinks they need to teach adult me "the right way" to eat and "how not to be bloated." Also, I'm not getting up at sunrise just because the bride wants to exercise  ::)

EllenS

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Re: Controversial food choices, is it worth it?
« Reply #16 on: December 30, 2015, 10:47:10 PM »
I don't have a problem with the menu. Although I have a bone to pick with her saying:
"but I hope that having a ‘healthy’ wedding showsof  people that healthy living can be so simple"

I don't know if she's referring to her own guests, or to her cookbook audience. But as a wedding guest, I would dislike the idea that the host thinks they need to teach adult me "the right way" to eat and "how not to be bloated." Also, I'm not getting up at sunrise just because the bride wants to exercise  ::)

Yes, well the whole "wedding as stunt to sell my book" is a different issue.

Katana_Geldar

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Re: Controversial food choices, is it worth it?
« Reply #17 on: December 30, 2015, 11:03:13 PM »
There is no way I would be getting up at dawn for yoga as I read somewhere else. When I'm on holiday, I'm on holiday. And I sleep in. ;)

Jones

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Re: Controversial food choices, is it worth it?
« Reply #18 on: December 31, 2015, 07:41:22 AM »
Umm, her causes of bloat and my causes are apparently different. Please don't feed me any brussel sprouts. I could deal with the described menu for one meal, but 4 days (as I interpret the article) you will see an over sugared (I love fruit) over fibered hangry side of me. Trust me I have tried that diet before....


...And I used to be allergic to seafood. Have apparently grown out of a childhood allergy...still hate the smell.
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Carotte

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Re: Controversial food choices, is it worth it?
« Reply #19 on: December 31, 2015, 08:22:37 AM »
I don't feel like fish is a controversial food, I might not like it very much like a lot of people, and I wouldn't activelly choose it, but it's not like I've never encountered fish before in my life.
A vegetarian or vegan wouldn't be controversial either, you don't need animal protein at every single meal.
A bug diner, an undangered-species diner, now that would be disputable (I might not eat at either of those, but I'd rather see an ant rissoto than a filet of whale in my plate!).

What I see some posters focusing on here is the problem of something a) actually filling and well balanced and b) that would take concern with allergies, but that's not really the point now is it? I mean, you can have the same problem with a steak diner: some people cannot or will not eat meat, some plain don't like meat, just a steak in his juice would repulse some people, having only a steak and mashed cheesy potatoes would be a dietary nightmare for some and so on.

It's not really about the category of what is in the plate, it's about if it's a well thought out meal.
There's also quite a difference between pushing a livestyle on someone and inviting someone to try something different once, 4 days of meals and activities under the "only green and yellow food that are sown in april" is even acceptable if guests can opt in/out and have other options.

z_squared82

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Re: Controversial food choices, is it worth it?
« Reply #20 on: December 31, 2015, 09:27:31 AM »
While not a meal I would enjoy, I fail to see how it's controversial.

With that title, I thought the happy couple was going to be serving horse. Or seal.

ladyknight1

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Re: Controversial food choices, is it worth it?
« Reply #21 on: December 31, 2015, 10:08:00 AM »
I don't have a problem with her wedding menu, even if I wouldn't personally eat it. But from the sounds of it, this was a four-day destination wedding and she served similar things for all the meals.
Quote
prior to the nuptials she treated ladies to a heath spa and a raw vegan meal for lunch.

Quote
Guests were served sugar-free bliss balls and banana-date-walnut muffins from her recipe book, The Healthy Life, for breakfast while away for the four days.

They were also served steamed veggies for dinner, fresh fruit for dessert and had access to a vitamin juice station.

I hope she warned people, and had alternative restaurants they could go to instead. Contrary to her beliefs on "clean eating" making her guests feel their best, sudden radical changes in diet can actually make you feel pretty lousy until your body gets used to them.

According to the article, this was the only food available to the guests at the destination wedding resort for four days. I, for one, would not have been happy or content with her health food regimen, as it is contraindicated for anyone with diabetes or metabolic syndrome. I love fish, and vegetables, but need other proteins for four days of meals.

In another article, it lists foods available to the guests and wedding party.
Quote
'For lunch there was a raw vegan menu, featuring tofu "fish" cakes, rice paper rolls, fresh fruit and natural teas.'


http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-3372845/Jessica-Sepel-s-clean-wedding-sees-guests-doing-sunrise-yoga-dine-wholesome-gluten-sugar-free-menu-toast-organic-wine.html
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HannahGrace

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Re: Controversial food choices, is it worth it?
« Reply #22 on: December 31, 2015, 10:24:55 AM »
I mean, it is a 4 day destination wedding - many people would choose not to attend for a variety of reasons.  But I would not classify the food as "controversial."

Onyx_TKD

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Re: Controversial food choices, is it worth it?
« Reply #23 on: December 31, 2015, 12:21:11 PM »
According to the article, this was the only food available to the guests at the destination wedding resort for four days. I, for one, would not have been happy or content with her health food regimen, as it is contraindicated for anyone with diabetes or metabolic syndrome. I love fish, and vegetables, but need other proteins for four days of meals.

Could you please clarify which article and where it says that? I just read through both the article you linked to and re-read the article from the OP, and I couldn't find any mention that there was no other food available to guests at the resort. Even if they didn't like the meals provided by the hosts, I saw no indication that they were required to attend every single hosted meal over the four days or that the resort had no restaurants or room service available with other foods.

Even for the meals provided by the couple themselves, I couldn't even find anywhere that they specified the full menu for a single meal. Every description I saw of specific food items had qualifiers like "a range of dishes, including..." or "savoury and sweet options each morning for breakfast, including..." or "a menu filled with whole foods such as..." which imply that other unspecified items were offered, or "a raw vegan menu, featuring..." which similarly doesn't specify that the "featured" items were the entirety of the meal. Your linked article also mentioned "healthy buffets," suggesting that guests were free to pick and choose what and how much they wanted from the offered items.

ETA: The OP article does include the sentences "A TOWERING cake, rich foods and lots of wine, beer and champagne — those are the things we have come to expect at a wedding. Not if you’re health junkie Jessica Sepel, who denied guests these indulgent treats during her nutritious nuptials in Thailand on Sunday." [The all caps are the article's formatting, not mine.] But even this vague hook doesn't say that guests were "denied" anything except specifically cake, "rich food," and "lots of" alcoholic beverages. I'm not aware of any etiquette requirement to serve any of these things at either a wedding or a hosted vacation. Hosts should try to provide good, satisfying food, but that requires the food to be "rich" or to include specific items like cake and alcohol.
« Last Edit: December 31, 2015, 12:30:38 PM by Onyx_TKD »

shhh its me

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Re: Controversial food choices, is it worth it?
« Reply #24 on: December 31, 2015, 12:48:39 PM »
I mean, it is a 4 day destination wedding - many people would choose not to attend for a variety of reasons.  But I would not classify the food as "controversial."

I don't think it was controversial at all.  Depending how available other food was I think it could have been really poor hosting. I don't think the host are obligated to buy everyone their choice of foods.  I do think host are obligated to be really careful if they create a situation in which people have no choices/extremely limited choices over several meals. 

rose red

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Re: Controversial food choices, is it worth it?
« Reply #25 on: December 31, 2015, 12:52:19 PM »
I find it hard to believe it's the only food available. I can see that's the only food paid for by the HC, but as for availability? I'm sure they have restaurants and room service the guests can pay for themselves. Also, the HC must know their guests and the guests must know them and know what they were getting into since the articles says the guests "absolutely loved it and described them as 'excited'." They even provided (organic) wine.

Like many have said, the main dish may not be to your taste, but they are not rude. Substitute healthy for vegetarian or Kosher or Italian or Chinese or Indian. Many people don't like one or more of those but nobody would call it "controversial."

nuit93

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Re: Controversial food choices, is it worth it?
« Reply #26 on: December 31, 2015, 01:04:33 PM »
Sounds delicious, actually.

I just hope they had some kind of plan in mind for people who couldn't eat fish or the other options provided.

blue2000

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Re: Controversial food choices, is it worth it?
« Reply #27 on: December 31, 2015, 01:28:59 PM »
According to the article, this was the only food available to the guests at the destination wedding resort for four days. I, for one, would not have been happy or content with her health food regimen, as it is contraindicated for anyone with diabetes or metabolic syndrome. I love fish, and vegetables, but need other proteins for four days of meals.

Could you please clarify which article and where it says that? I just read through both the article you linked to and re-read the article from the OP, and I couldn't find any mention that there was no other food available to guests at the resort. Even if they didn't like the meals provided by the hosts, I saw no indication that they were required to attend every single hosted meal over the four days or that the resort had no restaurants or room service available with other foods.

Even for the meals provided by the couple themselves, I couldn't even find anywhere that they specified the full menu for a single meal. Every description I saw of specific food items had qualifiers like "a range of dishes, including..." or "savoury and sweet options each morning for breakfast, including..." or "a menu filled with whole foods such as..." which imply that other unspecified items were offered, or "a raw vegan menu, featuring..." which similarly doesn't specify that the "featured" items were the entirety of the meal. Your linked article also mentioned "healthy buffets," suggesting that guests were free to pick and choose what and how much they wanted from the offered items.

ETA: The OP article does include the sentences "A TOWERING cake, rich foods and lots of wine, beer and champagne — those are the things we have come to expect at a wedding. Not if you’re health junkie Jessica Sepel, who denied guests these indulgent treats during her nutritious nuptials in Thailand on Sunday." [The all caps are the article's formatting, not mine.] But even this vague hook doesn't say that guests were "denied" anything except specifically cake, "rich food," and "lots of" alcoholic beverages. I'm not aware of any etiquette requirement to serve any of these things at either a wedding or a hosted vacation. Hosts should try to provide good, satisfying food, but that requires the food to be "rich" or to include specific items like cake and alcohol.

A "raw vegan lunch" is a raw vegan lunch, no matter what the bride lists for the dishes or which ones the guests end up eating. A retreat with a "healthy menu" that lists fish and steamed veggies as the main choices is not going to contain a cheeseburger. And health retreats similar to this are almost always self-contained - there would be nothing other than the planned choices for food or activities on site. They do that on purpose, so you are not tempted by unhealthy food.

But it is still possible that the guests could go offsite and eat at the resort. At least I'm hoping. Just reading the menus is making me hungry for cheeseburgers. :P
You are only young once. After that you have to think up some other excuse.

mmswm

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Re: Controversial food choices, is it worth it?
« Reply #28 on: December 31, 2015, 01:39:22 PM »
After reading a few of the articles about this particular wedding, I have to be honest and say that I would have RSVP'd no based on the planned food offerings.  While  it's entirely within the bride's prerogative to choose what she wants to serve, it's also my prerogative to say no.  My dietary needs would not be met and I'm not about to subject myself to that kind of discomfort for four days (I would be able to be polite for a standard reception).  I think this is where the difference is.  The bride has these people held captive for several days.  If she's not taking into account individual food issues, health concerns and even simple likes and dislikes for that great of a time period, she's not being a good host and therefore rude. I can pretend not to be "all that hungry" in order to avoid cross contamination from obvious food allergens for one meal (as I also think that catering to every person's specific needs is likely impossible, and sometimes I'm just the odd man out).  I can't do that for four days.
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Katana_Geldar

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Re: Controversial food choices, is it worth it?
« Reply #29 on: December 31, 2015, 02:05:41 PM »
I find it hard to believe it's the only food available. I can see that's the only food paid for by the HC, but as for availability? I'm sure they have restaurants and room service the guests can pay for themselves. Also, the HC must know their guests and the guests must know them and know what they were getting into since the articles says the guests "absolutely loved it and described them as 'excited'." They even provided (organic) wine.

Like many have said, the main dish may not be to your taste, but they are not rude. Substitute healthy for vegetarian or Kosher or Italian or Chinese or Indian. Many people don't like one or more of those but nobody would call it "controversial."
It's in Thailand at a health retreat. I imagine getting room service may be difficult and the retreat may not be in a good area for restaurants.


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