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Author Topic: Controversial food choices, is it worth it?  (Read 28374 times)

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gellchom

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Re: Controversial food choices, is it worth it?
« Reply #45 on: January 01, 2016, 11:36:54 PM »
I agree with most of the posters: this menu wasn't "controversial," and the only rudeness, if you can even call it that, not just obnoxiousness, would be making a point of sending a message or "this superior diet is the way you should be eating" to the guests.

Four days is one matter, but the OP asked in general a very good question about where choices reflecting personal preferences become poor hospitality, if not rudeness. 

I think we can all agree that it is not rude or poor hospitality not to provide every possible choice that a guest might want.

And I think we would agree that although it might not be "rude," it's not very hospitable to provide inadequate amounts of food, absolutely tasteless food, or something that the hosts know that only very few of their guests would be comfortable eating (say, in the US, an all-insect or dog menu).

And of course it is rude to invite people you know are allergic to something and have it pervade the menu, or do something like, I don't know, host an interfaith meal for Christians, Jews, and Muslims and serve pork as the main course, or passive-aggressively serve only things to your in-laws that you know they can't stand.  Things like that, not to mention a situation in which some of those guests are paying for the reception, as in the bride's parents someone posted about, and the HC chose food they knew the parents didn't like -- not cool, IMO.

But I don't think that was the OP's question; I think it was just about general hosting for large groups.  How "general," for lack of a better word, do you need to be to be a good host?  Or must you provide choices?

I disagree that simply serving a vegetarian or fish meal without another option is "rude" even though many people dislike or are allergic to fish or don't feel fed without meat or whatever.  How many would you even need to have?  If you are serving fish, you can add a beef or chicken choice, but that's no good for vegetarians, kosher, and halal (assuming ordinary meat) people; choose cheese ravioli and it's no good for the lactose-intolerant and gluten-sensitive; and so on.  It won't kill anyone to just eat sides for one meal.  A guest can often ask a server discreetly to make up a vegetable plate or if there is a pasta plate available, which there often is, or just eat the things they can eat.  We'd all love to have exactly what we would order off a menu, but we aren't in a restaurant (and one of our own choosing at that); just as if you were being hosted at a dinner party in their home, the hosts serve what they are serving, hoping their guests will enjoy it, and that's perfectly polite. 

Katana_Geldar

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Re: Controversial food choices, is it worth it?
« Reply #46 on: January 01, 2016, 11:59:39 PM »
That doesn't work with how Australians do weddings. It's normally alternate drop of two dishes. For dietary requirements you talk to the couple to get a special meal.

Here's a story I was told once where a controversial menu collided head on with a bridezilla. A vegan bridezilla. And please note there were only five vegans in attendance, including the bride.

So, we decided not to eat beforehand and to see how the food turned out. It wasn't great, and a significant number of people also discovered that too.

Wedding was fine, nice ceremony and went well. It was at 2pm, reception started at 6pm.

People arrived, there was finger food which was quite nice. Dips, corn chips, normal chips, organic vegan mini pizzas and burgers. Happily scoffed some of those, as did many others in anticipation of the meal ahead.

Funnily, the waitress said to us "I suggest you eat now, the food to come is pretty bad".

Entree was a japanese style seaweed soup with tofu cubes. It was nice, I left the tofu.

Mains was bad. It was a soy and chickpea pattie/meat style offering with vegetables and pasta. Veges and pasta was OK, bit bland. The meat substitute was downright horrid, a few glances around and everyone had the same disgusted look on their faces.

A few kids were crying because they didnt like the food... the catering company offered to make the kids something from the kitchem to which the bride starting shrieking about no animal slaughter at her wedding.

Desert was a soy bean custard/creme with soy ice cream and a vegan chocolate pudding. Wasn't too bad but again pretty bland.

Wedding cake was a fruit cake with icing, also dry and floury.

After the meal and speeches, people started mingling, saying how poor the main meal was and how hungry they were still. So we put in $5 a head and ordered pizza, which was delivered to the car park. There were 30 pizzas ordered, and about 45-50 people and kids eating in the carpark.

Bride found out, started screaming at "the barbarians" and then took off in a sulk. The groom also came out, apologised and paid for the pizza. He said he was sorry we had a vegan only meal and he had tried to convince her otherwise.

An hour later the bride was back in the reception, still pouty but seemingly over it. We had hit the bar since and had a good rest of the night.]

I suspect the food could have been much better if it had more flavour the catering company probably didnt have a lot of experience in full vegan meals for 100, it was pretty dry and bland. Gotta say, the mini pizzas and vege burgers were nice :)


Even if you do want a certain style of food at your wedding, your guests still want to eat!

Benni

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Re: Controversial food choices, is it worth it?
« Reply #47 on: January 02, 2016, 12:02:55 AM »
Being gluten free, I am one of those people with a special needs diet.  I have learned that I, and only I, am responsible for what I eat.  So the menu for this wedding would not bother me.  I would have packed enough granola bars and other foods and/or contacted the kitchen and notified them of my special diet so I would never go hungry.  Besides, I can go four days on a vegan menu and it would not hurt me one bit (as long as it was a GF vegan menu.)

Would I like this, not really.  Is it rude, not really.  The only rudeness I see is if the bride and groom pushed their lifestyle on their guests by pestering them and verbally pushing the guests to agree that the HC's menu was the best ever and that the HC's lifestyle choices were the only good choices to make.

Onyx_TKD

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Re: Controversial food choices, is it worth it?
« Reply #48 on: January 02, 2016, 08:10:17 AM »
That doesn't work with how Australians do weddings. It's normally alternate drop of two dishes. For dietary requirements you talk to the couple to get a special meal.

Here's a story I was told once where a controversial menu collided head on with a bridezilla. A vegan bridezilla. And please note there were only five vegans in attendance, including the bride.

So, we decided not to eat beforehand and to see how the food turned out. It wasn't great, and a significant number of people also discovered that too.

Wedding was fine, nice ceremony and went well. It was at 2pm, reception started at 6pm.

People arrived, there was finger food which was quite nice. Dips, corn chips, normal chips, organic vegan mini pizzas and burgers. Happily scoffed some of those, as did many others in anticipation of the meal ahead.

Funnily, the waitress said to us "I suggest you eat now, the food to come is pretty bad".

Entree was a japanese style seaweed soup with tofu cubes. It was nice, I left the tofu.

Mains was bad. It was a soy and chickpea pattie/meat style offering with vegetables and pasta. Veges and pasta was OK, bit bland. The meat substitute was downright horrid, a few glances around and everyone had the same disgusted look on their faces.

A few kids were crying because they didnt like the food... the catering company offered to make the kids something from the kitchem to which the bride starting shrieking about no animal slaughter at her wedding.

Desert was a soy bean custard/creme with soy ice cream and a vegan chocolate pudding. Wasn't too bad but again pretty bland.

Wedding cake was a fruit cake with icing, also dry and floury.

After the meal and speeches, people started mingling, saying how poor the main meal was and how hungry they were still. So we put in $5 a head and ordered pizza, which was delivered to the car park. There were 30 pizzas ordered, and about 45-50 people and kids eating in the carpark.

Bride found out, started screaming at "the barbarians" and then took off in a sulk. The groom also came out, apologised and paid for the pizza. He said he was sorry we had a vegan only meal and he had tried to convince her otherwise.

An hour later the bride was back in the reception, still pouty but seemingly over it. We had hit the bar since and had a good rest of the night.]

I suspect the food could have been much better if it had more flavour the catering company probably didnt have a lot of experience in full vegan meals for 100, it was pretty dry and bland. Gotta say, the mini pizzas and vege burgers were nice :)


Even if you do want a certain style of food at your wedding, your guests still want to eat!

So the guests knew the couple was vegan. At the wedding, they were served "nice," substantial finger food, a "nice" soup, OK but bland sides and dessert. The *only* thing on the entire menu deemed "bad" was the soy/chickpea patty. And 45-50 people thought the appropriate response was to gripe about the hosts' hospitality at the reception and order pizza in the parking lot to rub their nose in the fact that the guests hated their food? The bride handled it badly, but I agree with her sentiment--the guests were behaving like boors.  :(

Adults should be able to handle a meal with one item they hate without throwing tantrums about how hungry they are, and stop for food on the way home (away from the hosts and their event) if they really need to.

Carotte

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Re: Controversial food choices, is it worth it?
« Reply #49 on: January 02, 2016, 08:50:21 AM »
That doesn't work with how Australians do weddings. It's normally alternate drop of two dishes. For dietary requirements you talk to the couple to get a special meal.

Here's a story I was told once where a controversial menu collided head on with a bridezilla. A vegan bridezilla. And please note there were only five vegans in attendance, including the bride.

[snip]

How is that a controversial menu? So ok the food wasn't the best in the world, but it wasn't inherent to being vegan, it was inherent to being badly prepared.
When you hear about dry rubbery tasteless chicken or over cooked steaks or tiny portions, you don't blame the HC dietary choices, you blame the catering, same here.


Kind of in the subject but when I hear about unsubstantial food portions sometimes I wonder how it actually compares to the WHO/FDA guidelines, just because some people are used to their entire daily intake (or x3 that) recommendation in one meal doesn't mean it's what they should expect/it's rude if it's not the case.
Yes, it's good hosting to adapt to your guests and all, but sometimes they see rudeness where there is none.

#borecore

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Re: Controversial food choices, is it worth it?
« Reply #50 on: January 02, 2016, 09:00:39 AM »
Both of Katana's stories are rude for reasons unrelated to the dietary choices of the couple. The first is rude because of the bride proselytizing. The second is rude because the guests created drama.

I had a cousin whose catering for his wedding was a gross buffet that catered to any dietary choice you can imagine. Was his catering rude because it was universally regarded as greasy, flavorless and close to disgusting? No. It was just a few poor decisions.

My wedding was vegetarian, and vegan-friendly. People ate heaps and heaps and we still had leftovers. People complimented our excellent food.   Were we rude because we had food we and our 1/3 veg guests could eat, and meat-eaters could enjoy? No. I would not have felt bad if I found out people bought burgers in the gap between dinner and dancing at an offsite restaurant, but I would have been annoyed if they got it delivered to the reception!

gollymolly2

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Re: Controversial food choices, is it worth it?
« Reply #51 on: January 02, 2016, 02:32:27 PM »
That doesn't work with how Australians do weddings. It's normally alternate drop of two dishes. For dietary requirements you talk to the couple to get a special meal.

Here's a story I was told once where a controversial menu collided head on with a bridezilla. A vegan bridezilla. And please note there were only five vegans in attendance, including the bride.

So, we decided not to eat beforehand and to see how the food turned out. It wasn't great, and a significant number of people also discovered that too.

Wedding was fine, nice ceremony and went well. It was at 2pm, reception started at 6pm.

People arrived, there was finger food which was quite nice. Dips, corn chips, normal chips, organic vegan mini pizzas and burgers. Happily scoffed some of those, as did many others in anticipation of the meal ahead.

Funnily, the waitress said to us "I suggest you eat now, the food to come is pretty bad".

Entree was a japanese style seaweed soup with tofu cubes. It was nice, I left the tofu.

Mains was bad. It was a soy and chickpea pattie/meat style offering with vegetables and pasta. Veges and pasta was OK, bit bland. The meat substitute was downright horrid, a few glances around and everyone had the same disgusted look on their faces.

A few kids were crying because they didnt like the food... the catering company offered to make the kids something from the kitchem to which the bride starting shrieking about no animal slaughter at her wedding.

Desert was a soy bean custard/creme with soy ice cream and a vegan chocolate pudding. Wasn't too bad but again pretty bland.

Wedding cake was a fruit cake with icing, also dry and floury.

After the meal and speeches, people started mingling, saying how poor the main meal was and how hungry they were still. So we put in $5 a head and ordered pizza, which was delivered to the car park. There were 30 pizzas ordered, and about 45-50 people and kids eating in the carpark.

Bride found out, started screaming at "the barbarians" and then took off in a sulk. The groom also came out, apologised and paid for the pizza. He said he was sorry we had a vegan only meal and he had tried to convince her otherwise.

An hour later the bride was back in the reception, still pouty but seemingly over it. We had hit the bar since and had a good rest of the night.]

I suspect the food could have been much better if it had more flavour the catering company probably didnt have a lot of experience in full vegan meals for 100, it was pretty dry and bland. Gotta say, the mini pizzas and vege burgers were nice :)


Even if you do want a certain style of food at your wedding, your guests still want to eat!

So the guests knew the couple was vegan. At the wedding, they were served "nice," substantial finger food, a "nice" soup, OK but bland sides and dessert. The *only* thing on the entire menu deemed "bad" was the soy/chickpea patty. And 45-50 people thought the appropriate response was to gripe about the hosts' hospitality at the reception and order pizza in the parking lot to rub their nose in the fact that the guests hated their food? The bride handled it badly, but I agree with her sentiment--the guests were behaving like boors.  :(

Adults should be able to handle a meal with one item they hate without throwing tantrums about how hungry they are, and stop for food on the way home (away from the hosts and their event) if they really need to.

Yeah, totally. The guests were unbelievably rude.

If food tastes bad, the correct response is to ... get over it. Can people really not deal with eating one meal that doesn't taste great?

gellchom

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Re: Controversial food choices, is it worth it?
« Reply #52 on: January 03, 2016, 12:46:44 AM »
That doesn't work with how Australians do weddings. It's normally alternate drop of two dishes. For dietary requirements you talk to the couple to get a special meal.

Here's a story I was told once where a controversial menu collided head on with a bridezilla. A vegan bridezilla. And please note there were only five vegans in attendance, including the bride.

So, we decided not to eat beforehand and to see how the food turned out. It wasn't great, and a significant number of people also discovered that too.

Wedding was fine, nice ceremony and went well. It was at 2pm, reception started at 6pm.

People arrived, there was finger food which was quite nice. Dips, corn chips, normal chips, organic vegan mini pizzas and burgers. Happily scoffed some of those, as did many others in anticipation of the meal ahead.

Funnily, the waitress said to us "I suggest you eat now, the food to come is pretty bad".

Entree was a japanese style seaweed soup with tofu cubes. It was nice, I left the tofu.

Mains was bad. It was a soy and chickpea pattie/meat style offering with vegetables and pasta. Veges and pasta was OK, bit bland. The meat substitute was downright horrid, a few glances around and everyone had the same disgusted look on their faces.

A few kids were crying because they didnt like the food... the catering company offered to make the kids something from the kitchem to which the bride starting shrieking about no animal slaughter at her wedding.

Desert was a soy bean custard/creme with soy ice cream and a vegan chocolate pudding. Wasn't too bad but again pretty bland.

Wedding cake was a fruit cake with icing, also dry and floury.

After the meal and speeches, people started mingling, saying how poor the main meal was and how hungry they were still. So we put in $5 a head and ordered pizza, which was delivered to the car park. There were 30 pizzas ordered, and about 45-50 people and kids eating in the carpark.

Bride found out, started screaming at "the barbarians" and then took off in a sulk. The groom also came out, apologised and paid for the pizza. He said he was sorry we had a vegan only meal and he had tried to convince her otherwise.

An hour later the bride was back in the reception, still pouty but seemingly over it. We had hit the bar since and had a good rest of the night.]

I suspect the food could have been much better if it had more flavour the catering company probably didnt have a lot of experience in full vegan meals for 100, it was pretty dry and bland. Gotta say, the mini pizzas and vege burgers were nice :)


Even if you do want a certain style of food at your wedding, your guests still want to eat!

So the guests knew the couple was vegan. At the wedding, they were served "nice," substantial finger food, a "nice" soup, OK but bland sides and dessert. The *only* thing on the entire menu deemed "bad" was the soy/chickpea patty. And 45-50 people thought the appropriate response was to gripe about the hosts' hospitality at the reception and order pizza in the parking lot to rub their nose in the fact that the guests hated their food? The bride handled it badly, but I agree with her sentiment--the guests were behaving like boors.  :(

Adults should be able to handle a meal with one item they hate without throwing tantrums about how hungry they are, and stop for food on the way home (away from the hosts and their event) if they really need to.

Yeah, totally. The guests were unbelievably rude.

If food tastes bad, the correct response is to ... get over it. Can people really not deal with eating one meal that doesn't taste great?

I agree 100%.  What rude, ungrateful, obnoxious guests.  And they probably thought it was cute.  I'm sure the bride wishes she had reacted differently, but I can understand her being that badly upset.  Do these people order a pizza to their host's driveway if they don't like some of the food at a dinner party?  Sheesh. 

FauxFoodist

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Re: Controversial food choices, is it worth it?
« Reply #53 on: January 03, 2016, 01:37:57 AM »
That doesn't work with how Australians do weddings. It's normally alternate drop of two dishes. For dietary requirements you talk to the couple to get a special meal.

Here's a story I was told once where a controversial menu collided head on with a bridezilla. A vegan bridezilla. And please note there were only five vegans in attendance, including the bride.

So, we decided not to eat beforehand and to see how the food turned out. It wasn't great, and a significant number of people also discovered that too.

Wedding was fine, nice ceremony and went well. It was at 2pm, reception started at 6pm.

People arrived, there was finger food which was quite nice. Dips, corn chips, normal chips, organic vegan mini pizzas and burgers. Happily scoffed some of those, as did many others in anticipation of the meal ahead.

Funnily, the waitress said to us "I suggest you eat now, the food to come is pretty bad".

Entree was a japanese style seaweed soup with tofu cubes. It was nice, I left the tofu.

Mains was bad. It was a soy and chickpea pattie/meat style offering with vegetables and pasta. Veges and pasta was OK, bit bland. The meat substitute was downright horrid, a few glances around and everyone had the same disgusted look on their faces.

A few kids were crying because they didnt like the food... the catering company offered to make the kids something from the kitchem to which the bride starting shrieking about no animal slaughter at her wedding.

Desert was a soy bean custard/creme with soy ice cream and a vegan chocolate pudding. Wasn't too bad but again pretty bland.

Wedding cake was a fruit cake with icing, also dry and floury.

After the meal and speeches, people started mingling, saying how poor the main meal was and how hungry they were still. So we put in $5 a head and ordered pizza, which was delivered to the car park. There were 30 pizzas ordered, and about 45-50 people and kids eating in the carpark.

Bride found out, started screaming at "the barbarians" and then took off in a sulk. The groom also came out, apologised and paid for the pizza. He said he was sorry we had a vegan only meal and he had tried to convince her otherwise.

An hour later the bride was back in the reception, still pouty but seemingly over it. We had hit the bar since and had a good rest of the night.]

I suspect the food could have been much better if it had more flavour the catering company probably didnt have a lot of experience in full vegan meals for 100, it was pretty dry and bland. Gotta say, the mini pizzas and vege burgers were nice :)


Even if you do want a certain style of food at your wedding, your guests still want to eat!

So the guests knew the couple was vegan. At the wedding, they were served "nice," substantial finger food, a "nice" soup, OK but bland sides and dessert. The *only* thing on the entire menu deemed "bad" was the soy/chickpea patty. And 45-50 people thought the appropriate response was to gripe about the hosts' hospitality at the reception and order pizza in the parking lot to rub their nose in the fact that the guests hated their food? The bride handled it badly, but I agree with her sentiment--the guests were behaving like boors.  :(

Adults should be able to handle a meal with one item they hate without throwing tantrums about how hungry they are, and stop for food on the way home (away from the hosts and their event) if they really need to.

Yeah, totally. The guests were unbelievably rude.

If food tastes bad, the correct response is to ... get over it. Can people really not deal with eating one meal that doesn't taste great?

Years ago, I attended a Christmas dinner party of a friend and his DH.  Friend wanted to replicate the dinner parties he grew up with that his parents threw so he invited us all with the idea that they'd be throwing this glamorous dinner party and that DH would make his fabulous spaghetti (so I was told as I'd never tasted it and thought serving spaghetti at a dinner party wasn't really glamorous but whatever).  Anyway, I was going to the party to see Friend and DH and socialize with other friends so I really wasn't very concerned about the food before I got there.  Well, got there and found out DH didn't want to work that hard to make dinner so we were served microwaved frozen lasagnes.  They were atrocious.  They were the worst party food, if not the worst food ever, that I'd been served by anyone.  They were also burnt.  There also really wasn't enough.  It was also the only food we were provided, and we weren't even served (we had to go to the microwave and get it out of the cardboard container ourselves.  All of us were gracious and ate a little of this burnt food and had a lovely time in spite of the bad food.  On my way home, I stopped at a fast-food drive-through and picked up some dinner but never told my hosts their hospitality was anything less than acceptable.

So, yeah, people should be able to deal with one bad meal and get over it.  It's not about them.  If I were the bride, I don't know if I would've wanted anything to do with those wedding guests after my wedding day.

Drunken Housewife

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Re: Controversial food choices, is it worth it?
« Reply #54 on: January 03, 2016, 05:27:52 AM »
Being at a wedding is not the same as going to a Michelin starred restaurant. You aren't there to have an amazing meal. 

Children crying because they don't like their food should be whisked away until they have calmed down.  As a mother, I always carried some emergency snacks in my bag when mine were small (including when we went to weddings), so in those circumstances I'd have pulled out my snacks. 

In the case of the vegan wedding, the guests should NOT have gone out to the parking lot to eat pizzas.  That seems very passive aggressive.  Obviously the bride will have her feelings hurt.  The caterer did a poor job -- but a wedding could be vegan and amazing.  For example, I have eaten a few times at this pricey vegan restaurant, and the food is amazing:  http://www.citizenfoxsf.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/Dinner_11.16.pdf  A few months ago I went to a party with a catered vegan spread, and I went back for seconds.  It was really good food, and I am a picky eater.  My daughter and I loved the food.

At my wedding, we served a vegetarian buffet, and every bit of the food was devoured.  I didn't hear any complaints.  I hope never to need another wedding, but if I were ever in the position of holding another one, I'd get Citizen Fox to cater it with a vegan buffet, and I'm sure everyone would get a good meal.
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Cherry91

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Re: Controversial food choices, is it worth it?
« Reply #55 on: January 03, 2016, 06:14:52 AM »
On one side, the bride's comments do seem rather patronising and condescending, with all the stuff about "eating right", when as several people have said, one person's right is another's oh so wrong.

On the other hand, in this case, the original article says that the bride took to her new diet while recovering from an ED, so I can sort of understand wanting to stick to "safe" foods on what will almost certainly be a stressful day. I also feel the original article is a touch biased, with it's intro reminding the reader what most happy couples (heavy implication) should be serving.
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Spring Water on Sundays

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Re: Controversial food choices, is it worth it?
« Reply #56 on: January 03, 2016, 04:16:02 PM »
That doesn't work with how Australians do weddings. It's normally alternate drop of two dishes. For dietary requirements you talk to the couple to get a special meal.

Here's a story I was told once where a controversial menu collided head on with a bridezilla. A vegan bridezilla. And please note there were only five vegans in attendance, including the bride.

So, we decided not to eat beforehand and to see how the food turned out. It wasn't great, and a significant number of people also discovered that too.

Wedding was fine, nice ceremony and went well. It was at 2pm, reception started at 6pm.

People arrived, there was finger food which was quite nice. Dips, corn chips, normal chips, organic vegan mini pizzas and burgers. Happily scoffed some of those, as did many others in anticipation of the meal ahead.

Funnily, the waitress said to us "I suggest you eat now, the food to come is pretty bad".

Entree was a japanese style seaweed soup with tofu cubes. It was nice, I left the tofu.

Mains was bad. It was a soy and chickpea pattie/meat style offering with vegetables and pasta. Veges and pasta was OK, bit bland. The meat substitute was downright horrid, a few glances around and everyone had the same disgusted look on their faces.

A few kids were crying because they didnt like the food... the catering company offered to make the kids something from the kitchem to which the bride starting shrieking about no animal slaughter at her wedding.

Desert was a soy bean custard/creme with soy ice cream and a vegan chocolate pudding. Wasn't too bad but again pretty bland.

Wedding cake was a fruit cake with icing, also dry and floury.

After the meal and speeches, people started mingling, saying how poor the main meal was and how hungry they were still. So we put in $5 a head and ordered pizza, which was delivered to the car park. There were 30 pizzas ordered, and about 45-50 people and kids eating in the carpark.

Bride found out, started screaming at "the barbarians" and then took off in a sulk. The groom also came out, apologised and paid for the pizza. He said he was sorry we had a vegan only meal and he had tried to convince her otherwise.

An hour later the bride was back in the reception, still pouty but seemingly over it. We had hit the bar since and had a good rest of the night.]

I suspect the food could have been much better if it had more flavour the catering company probably didnt have a lot of experience in full vegan meals for 100, it was pretty dry and bland. Gotta say, the mini pizzas and vege burgers were nice :)


Even if you do want a certain style of food at your wedding, your guests still want to eat!

So the guests knew the couple was vegan. At the wedding, they were served "nice," substantial finger food, a "nice" soup, OK but bland sides and dessert. The *only* thing on the entire menu deemed "bad" was the soy/chickpea patty. And 45-50 people thought the appropriate response was to gripe about the hosts' hospitality at the reception and order pizza in the parking lot to rub their nose in the fact that the guests hated their food? The bride handled it badly, but I agree with her sentiment--the guests were behaving like boors.  :(

Adults should be able to handle a meal with one item they hate without throwing tantrums about how hungry they are, and stop for food on the way home (away from the hosts and their event) if they really need to.

Yeah, totally. The guests were unbelievably rude.

If food tastes bad, the correct response is to ... get over it. Can people really not deal with eating one meal that doesn't taste great?

The problem with this menu wasn't that it was vegan, but maybe that some of the food was a little underseasoned. And a waitress warning guests that the food is bad? What an unprofessional brat. I'm sure the bride wishes she has reacted differently to the thoughtless behavior of her guests.

nuit93

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Re: Controversial food choices, is it worth it?
« Reply #57 on: January 03, 2016, 07:31:02 PM »
My mother spent much of my wedding planning time stressing over the fact that I was getting a food truck (she'd never heard of food trucks that served good food, just sub-par trucks at festivals and the like) instead of doing a "proper" plated meal.  Post-wedding, you'd think the food truck had been her idea.  She and everyone else LOVED it.  People were going back for seconds.

Sometimes the most "controversial" food choices end up being the most memorable in a good way!

Miss Understood

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Re: Controversial food choices, is it worth it?
« Reply #58 on: January 03, 2016, 08:23:47 PM »
My mother spent much of my wedding planning time stressing over the fact that I was getting a food truck (she'd never heard of food trucks that served good food, just sub-par trucks at festivals and the like) instead of doing a "proper" plated meal.  Post-wedding, you'd think the food truck had been her idea.  She and everyone else LOVED it.  People were going back for seconds.

Sometimes the most "controversial" food choices end up being the most memorable in a good way!

I think I remember that thread but I don't think I replied.  At first I was kind of on your Mom's side because at the time I thought of "food trucks" as those workplace last resort lunch spots also known as "roach coaches" - but now I know better and your Mom does too.  Food trucks have come a long way.   :)

rigs32

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Re: Controversial food choices, is it worth it?
« Reply #59 on: January 04, 2016, 11:31:45 AM »
I was in a wedding a few years ago in which the cake had a peanut butter filling and the cookies were all peanut butter.  I was disappointed to not have any dessert as I personally do not like peanuts, but I didn't think it was rude of the couple.  I did find it a supremely odd choice, considering how prevalent peanut allergies are.

The couple invited as many people as the venue could hold, which required clearing away four tables after dinner ended to create a dance floor.  Those people were left without a "home base" and most left at that point.  That, I thought, was rude.


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