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Author Topic: Wading in the fountain at the WWII Memorial  (Read 10737 times)

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kherbert05

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Re: Wading in the fountain at the WWII Memorial
« Reply #30 on: July 04, 2016, 03:12:44 AM »
I don't understand why climbing on any statue  would be acceptable; they are obviously not pieces of play/leisure equipment.  Any tourist, particularly in a culture foreign to them, would do well to refrain from crawling all over an art work.
Interactive art pieces are kind of a thing.
Selfie statue in Sugar Land Texas


The Houston zoo has various statues that people take picture of their kids with like Hans and the Giraffes  I have asked staff members been told it is fine for the kids to "ride" the animals or climb up on Hans drum or back. Hans was donated in the mid 50's if I remember correctly and generations of kids have taken their pictures there.


But people should be able to tell the difference. For example in Discovery Green Part there are Gateway Fountain and Mist Tree which kids can play in and the Kinder lake and Riley family fountains that you are not allowed to play in.
Don't Teach Them For Your Past. Teach Them For Their Future

Mustard

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Re: Wading in the fountain at the WWII Memorial
« Reply #31 on: July 04, 2016, 05:29:12 AM »
Exactly; one should be able to tell the difference between interactive street 'furniture' and a memorial to the fallen.

Katana_Geldar

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Re: Wading in the fountain at the WWII Memorial
« Reply #32 on: July 04, 2016, 07:32:28 AM »
There's the bronze pigs and mall balls in Adelaides Rundle Mall.

tabitha

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Re: Wading in the fountain at the WWII Memorial
« Reply #33 on: July 04, 2016, 07:33:19 AM »
Exactly; one should be able to tell the difference between interactive street 'furniture' and a memorial to the fallen.

Is it always clear? To anyone from any country?  And also, "one should be able to tell the difference" doesn't mean one always can.  And again, there are different ways of respecting the brave, the honourable, those that gave their lives...it varies by culture.

Didn't these soldiers die so that children can play freely?

Again, no one should disobey signs stating the fountain is off limits, I just think it is not neccesarily a sign of disrespect if someone ends up in one.

Katana_Geldar

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Re: Wading in the fountain at the WWII Memorial
« Reply #34 on: July 04, 2016, 07:34:54 AM »
Exactly; one should be able to tell the difference between interactive street 'furniture' and a memorial to the fallen.

Is it always clear? To anyone from any country?  And also, "one should be able to tell the difference" doesn't mean one always can.  And again, there are different ways of respecting the brave, the honourable, those that gave their lives...it varies by culture.

Didn't these soldiers die so that children can play freely?

Again, no one should disobey signs stating the fountain is off limits, I just think it is not neccesarily a sign of disrespect if someone ends up in one.
I was thinking the same thing. Though I'd be more worried about the quality of the water in a public fountain than damaging it.

I have seen public water play areas, they are clearly designed for that purpose though.

Margo

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Re: Wading in the fountain at the WWII Memorial
« Reply #35 on: July 04, 2016, 07:42:54 AM »
I don't think that it is inherently disrespectful simply because the fountain and pool are associated with a memorial.  I do think it is rude to disobey the specific rules and signs.

As Bethalize points out, memorial and interaction are not mutually exclusive. The Diana memorial actively encourages people using it in that way. So I don't think it's particuarll realistic to say that people ought to be able to tell the difference - in some cases it may not be immediately obvious. And the more different backgrounds and cultures your visitors have, the more likely it is that some will struggle to tell the difference. 

I personally think that people of different ages and backgrounds and cultures all relaxing and enjoyin themselves in peace is pretty much the best memorial you could possibly have, so while I understand that some may feel it is disresepctful, I personally do not.

I think that a piece of art which encorages people to engage with it is successful.

 

#borecore

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Re: Wading in the fountain at the WWII Memorial
« Reply #36 on: July 04, 2016, 07:56:31 AM »
Exactly; one should be able to tell the difference between interactive street 'furniture' and a memorial to the fallen.

Is it always clear? To anyone from any country?  And also, "one should be able to tell the difference" doesn't mean one always can.  And again, there are different ways of respecting the brave, the honourable, those that gave their lives...it varies by culture.

Didn't these soldiers die so that children can play freely?

Again, no one should disobey signs stating the fountain is off limits, I just think it is not neccesarily a sign of disrespect if someone ends up in one.

It doesn't have to be clear to anyone from every country at every memorial all the time. But it IS clear at this memorial, and people can pick up on context clues, I'm sure of it. Someone was deliberately ignoring the rules, and other people picked up on it and followed their lead, apparently. You don't just decide to dip into a somber memorial.

If someone jumped in the 9/11 memorial in New York, for instance, not only would they likely be injured, they'd also be disobeying clear signs and the overall mood of the place. You don't have to speak English to understand the latter. But when warning signs are posted, you also don't have to be able to read them to go, "Oh, a warning sign! Maybe I should be on alert to what those around me are doing."

MariaE

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Re: Wading in the fountain at the WWII Memorial
« Reply #37 on: July 04, 2016, 08:14:48 AM »
It doesn't have to be clear to anyone from every country at every memorial all the time. But it IS clear at this memorial, and people can pick up on context clues, I'm sure of it. Someone was deliberately ignoring the rules, and other people picked up on it and followed their lead, apparently. You don't just decide to dip into a somber memorial.

Is it, though? Like I mentioned earlier, I've been there, and I didn't see any such signs. I'm not saying they weren't there, just that they weren't obvious enough for me to spot. And I would have noticed, because I remember wondering if it would be inappropriate for me to rest my feet for awhile.

(I ended up erring on the side of caution, but the fact that I was wondering about it, means I'm pretty sure I'd have noticed the signs if they were obvious).
 
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tabitha

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Re: Wading in the fountain at the WWII Memorial
« Reply #38 on: July 04, 2016, 08:29:23 AM »
Exactly; one should be able to tell the difference between interactive street 'furniture' and a memorial to the fallen.

Is it always clear? To anyone from any country?  And also, "one should be able to tell the difference" doesn't mean one always can.  And again, there are different ways of respecting the brave, the honourable, those that gave their lives...it varies by culture.

Didn't these soldiers die so that children can play freely?

Again, no one should disobey signs stating the fountain is off limits,I just think it is not neccesarily a sign of disrespect if someone ends up in one.

It doesn't have to be clear to anyone from every country at every memorial all the time. But it IS clear at this memorial, and people can pick up on context clues, I'm sure of it. Someone was deliberately ignoring the rules, and other people picked up on it and followed their lead, apparently. You don't just decide to dip into a somber memorial.

If someone jumped in the 9/11 memorial in New York, for instance, not only would they likely be injured, they'd also be disobeying clear signs and the overall mood of the place. You don't have to speak English to understand the latter. But when warning signs are posted, you also don't have to be able to read them to go, "Oh, a warning sign! Maybe I should be on alert to what those around me are doing."

I'm not sure how this response relates to my post.  Didn't I cover the signage issue with the bolded?

kherbert05

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Re: Wading in the fountain at the WWII Memorial
« Reply #39 on: July 04, 2016, 10:52:17 AM »
NO - Tourist don't get a "break" for not knowing the culture. This is not some obscure Monument in the corner of Houston. It is the WWII Memorial on the Mall in Washington DC. You don't end up there by accident. Yes you can run and play on the green areas of the Mall but I can't think of one Monument along the Mall where it is acceptable to climb on them. OK it is acceptable to climb the inside of the Washington Monument.


 It isn't acceptable to do cartwheels in Westminster Abby, to joke around in Auschwitz, to wear your hat in the Alamo, or to walk into a Greek Orthodox Cathedral wearing short shorts, short sleeved shirts, and head uncovered (all female) during Holy Week. The last one I flat out refused to leave the bus, and laughed when they got kicked out. (I was in HS clothing was dictated by our chaperons who in 2 words were bigots and Idiots). If you go to another country you do some reading, you find out about the culture and you do your best to fit in. You will make mistakes but this is so basic there is no excuse. Anyone who can't figure that out needs to do their fellow citizens a favor and stay home (I have said this to my fellow US Citizens more than once).



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Mustard

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Re: Wading in the fountain at the WWII Memorial
« Reply #40 on: July 04, 2016, 11:04:15 AM »
Exactly; one should be able to tell the difference between interactive street 'furniture' and a memorial to the fallen.

O.K. - just stay out of the water and don't climb anything until you know exactly what the 'thing' is that you want to paddle in or climb all over.

gramma dishes

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Re: Wading in the fountain at the WWII Memorial
« Reply #41 on: July 04, 2016, 11:29:37 AM »
Exactly; one should be able to tell the difference between interactive street 'furniture' and a memorial to the fallen.

Yes.  There is a huge difference between interactive street art which clearly invites touch and a memorial to those who have died in war.  The latter is not intended to be used interactively and to do so in any way is blatantly disrespectful. 

I will say though that the Vietnam Wall is meant to be touched.

JoieGirl7

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Re: Wading in the fountain at the WWII Memorial
« Reply #42 on: July 04, 2016, 11:56:02 AM »


Those memorials are not cemeteries.  And I would disagree that they are meant to be somber places.  They are meant to be a majestic remembrance of those they were erected to honor.
 
People have waded in public fountains for centuries.  To expect that they should stop now?  It's just silly.  Especially with the heat and humidity you get in DC. 

Want to discourage people from wading in the fountains?  Build fountains that do not lend themselves to wading.  It can be done.  But, to build a large round pool around which people are to gather is always going to attract waders when the weather gets to be too much whether it's the Lourve, the Eiffel Tower or the WWII Memorial in DC.

tabitha

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Re: Wading in the fountain at the WWII Memorial
« Reply #43 on: July 04, 2016, 11:58:19 AM »
Exactly; one should be able to tell the difference between interactive street 'furniture' and a memorial to the fallen.

Yes.  There is a huge difference between interactive street art which clearly invites touch and a memorial to those who have died in war.  The latter is not intended to be used interactively and to do so in any way is blatantly disrespectful. 

I will say though that the Vietnam Wall is meant to be touched.

So how does one know that, although the Vietnam Wall is a memorial to those who have died, it is meant to be touched, but the water in a fountain that is a memorial to those who have died is not meant to be touched?  Signs aside, we all agree that signs are to be followed and respected.

And I disagree. Some interactive street art is, indeed, obvious, but I don't think war memorials are universally considered untouchable. 

tabitha

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Re: Wading in the fountain at the WWII Memorial
« Reply #44 on: July 04, 2016, 11:59:16 AM »


Those memorials are not cemeteries.  And I would disagree that they are meant to be somber places.  They are meant to be a majestic remembrance of those they were erected to honor.
 
People have waded in public fountains for centuries.  To expect that they should stop now?  It's just silly.  Especially with the heat and humidity you get in DC. 

Want to discourage people from wading in the fountains?  Build fountains that do not lend themselves to wading.  It can be done.  But, to build a large round pool around which people are to gather is always going to attract waders when the weather gets to be too much whether it's the Lourve, the Eiffel Tower or the WWII Memorial in DC.

What she said!