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Author Topic: To Iron or Not To Iron?  (Read 9967 times)

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LifeOnPluto

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Re: To Iron or Not To Iron?
« Reply #45 on: July 16, 2016, 10:34:24 PM »
I'm in my 30s, and I iron heaps of stuff. Including t-shirts and pillow cases! I draw the line at sheets though.

My mother (in her 60s) irons a lot too, including my dad's handkerchiefs, and table cloths!

On topic, I think you were fine, OP, in not ironing your guests' clothes. I would however, show them where the iron and board were kept, and informed them they were welcome to make use of them if they liked.

Mayadoz

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Re: To Iron or Not To Iron?
« Reply #46 on: July 18, 2016, 05:14:57 AM »

OP, your husband's assumption that of course you should be ironing the guest's clothing is very interesting to me.  Do you iron all of your clothes before hanging them up/putting them away and that's why he assumed you'd do the same with the guest's clothes?  Or did he just think that it was something you should do simply because they are guests and you are supposed to treat guests better than yourself or something?  No judgment, just curious.


Ha, that's the thing - I detest ironing and he hates cooking, so in the 26 years we've been together he has always taken care of the former and I the latter. (In the general scheme of things - obviously there have been exceptions in both cases.)
So given I generally just do not do ironing, I thought it was funny he thought I would do so in this case.
You're probably correct, he may have thought because they were guests, they'd get special treatment.

For the record, I put absolutely nothing in the ironing pile unless you really can't escape doing it - smart shirts, linen dresses etc. Definitely never bother with bedding or underwear! And not t-shirts either, especially in the height of summer when we're pretty much going through two or three a day each.

I get that some people find it relaxing, in the same way others find cooking or cleaning therapeutic sometimes....each to their own.
Life is short. Buy the shoes. Drink the wine. Order the dessert.

saki

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Re: To Iron or Not To Iron?
« Reply #47 on: July 19, 2016, 03:46:45 AM »
I definitely wouldn't iron clothing for guests.  To be honest, I wouldn't expect someone staying for a week to need to do laundry either so I don't think it would occur to me to offer.  If I did offer, which I have done occasionally for people staying for a longer period or as part of a longer trip, I'd offer to let them use the washing machine not to do it for them - not least because I wouldn't want to have to keep checking the washing basket and trying to make sure that anything that was theirs was done before they left.  Perhaps this isn't a problem if you do a lot of laundry but we only do about two loads a week so timing wouldn't be straightforward.

VorFemme

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Re: To Iron or Not To Iron?
« Reply #48 on: July 19, 2016, 04:30:17 PM »
I *was* pressing five dress shirts a week for VorGuy to wear to work for the last ten years or so of his military service.  He retired from the military and took up teaching, so I still pressed four shirts a week.  Now he's retired from teaching and my iron & ironing board stay in the sewing room, where they are more fun to use. 
Let sleeping dragons be.......morning breath......need I explain?

FauxFoodist

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Re: To Iron or Not To Iron?
« Reply #49 on: July 19, 2016, 06:41:16 PM »
I wouldn't be doing my house guests' laundry, much less iron for them (I hate ironing).  I'd tell them they could use the washer and dryer if they wanted to do their laundry.

Mayadoz

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Re: To Iron or Not To Iron?
« Reply #50 on: July 26, 2016, 02:19:47 AM »
I have to add this (sort of) update as I immediately thought of the helpful responses of my fellow eHellions, and they (hopefully) stopped me being rude in my answer.

This isn't about the friends who featured in the original post, but about a 16-year-old Dutch student we are currently hosting while she does work experience at a nearby restaurant owned by friends of ours. (How that came about was another topic.)

I hadn't offered to do her laundry as she is only with us for just over a week, and as others have said people generally have enough clothes to last that amount of time. However, it struck me last night that her work uniform could probably do with washing; although they have given her two sets, it is very hot here at the moment - still 35C-ish in the evening - and restaurant work is physical and hot at the best of times.

So last night, when she got home, I told her that I would be doing my washing today and if she wanted to add anything she would be welcome or, alternatively, I could show her where the detergent is kept and how to use the machine if she preferred.

She said she didn't think any of her clothes needed washing, but her work shirts were a little creased so maybe I could iron them.  :o

Mindful of eHell, I took a breath and said I was afraid I didn't do other people's ironing, but I was more than happy to show her where the iron and board were kept so that she could do them herself. She looked a little taken aback...

I was quite surprised but maybe her parents do everything for her at home. I have also shown her where everything is kept in the kitchen and told her to help herself to whatever she wants, but I get the impression she kind of expects me to pretty much wait on her, offer her drinks etc.

Life is short. Buy the shoes. Drink the wine. Order the dessert.

ladyknight1

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Re: To Iron or Not To Iron?
« Reply #51 on: July 26, 2016, 07:51:03 AM »
Well, I would probably take this as an opportunity to spend an hour or two teaching your boarder how to use your washing machine and how to iron. Otherwise, her clothing will soon be noticeably dirty and unsuitable.
ďAll that is gold does not glitter, Not all those who wander are lost; The old that is strong does not wither, Deep roots are not reached by the frost."
-J.R.R Tolkien

Winterlight

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Re: To Iron or Not To Iron?
« Reply #52 on: July 26, 2016, 11:03:36 AM »
No way. A guest should have access to the iron and board, but I would not iron or expect my host to iron.

This. I certainly wouldn't expect  it of my host. If something really needed pressing, I'd ask to use their iron- assuming they have one.

I've noticed that people who do iron have their own ways of doing it, and wouldn't want to do it "wrong" for them.
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To whom you speak,
Of whom you speak,
And how, and when, and where.
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jazzgirl205

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Re: To Iron or Not To Iron?
« Reply #53 on: July 29, 2016, 04:58:06 PM »
I don't own an iron.  But I'd also never offer to do a houseguest's laundry (moot point since I do not host overnight guests). 

There are different expectations for how people keep a house (and in my experience it runs along generational lines as older people tend to care more about the smaller details than their younger counterparts.  My grandparents and great grandparents would be appalled that I don't iron my sheets and store them in a pillowcase instead of properly folding them.   An etiquette lesson I learned as a kid ('doctorate of the original container' where you never put a condiment, salad dressing, etc on the table in its original container and instead transfer it to a serving dish) has faded from society faster than landline phones have.  Today, most people would not think twice if a bottle of (commercial) salad dressing was on the table and I see it as busy work to be avoided at all costs.

As for the term launder-- I worked for years in the finance industry so I associate it more with money than clothes.


I cannot bear to put a condiment on the table in it's original container.  I also pour the milk into a large pitcher before I store it in the refrigerator.  DH calls the plastic milk jug "the cow."  He cautioned our DD not to pour milk "directly from the cow."  I'm old fashioned, I guess.  I like to eat my meals with table linens, cloth napkins, and fresh flowers on the table.  Yes, my friends think I'm weird.

Luci

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Re: To Iron or Not To Iron?
« Reply #54 on: July 29, 2016, 06:54:51 PM »
I don't own an iron.  But I'd also never offer to do a houseguest's laundry (moot point since I do not host overnight guests). 

There are different expectations for how people keep a house (and in my experience it runs along generational lines as older people tend to care more about the smaller details than their younger counterparts.  My grandparents and great grandparents would be appalled that I don't iron my sheets and store them in a pillowcase instead of properly folding them.   An etiquette lesson I learned as a kid ('doctorate of the original container' where you never put a condiment, salad dressing, etc on the table in its original container and instead transfer it to a serving dish) has faded from society faster than landline phones have.  Today, most people would not think twice if a bottle of (commercial) salad dressing was on the table and I see it as busy work to be avoided at all costs.

As for the term launder-- I worked for years in the finance industry so I associate it more with money than clothes.


I cannot bear to put a condiment on the table in it's original container.  I also pour the milk into a large pitcher before I store it in the refrigerator.  DH calls the plastic milk jug "the cow."  He cautioned our DD not to pour milk "directly from the cow."  I'm old fashioned, I guess.  I like to eat my meals with table linens, cloth napkins, and fresh flowers on the table.  Yes, my friends think I'm weird.

I used to put the condiments in serving bowls until the time I served creamy horse radish and Miracle Whip and my friend used the horse radish as mayo. She likes mayo but not Miracle Whip and isn't familiar with horse radish. Oops. I don't even put the salad dressings in the nifty 3bowl server because everyone needs to know what dressing it is - the low fat versions look the same as the real versions - so it matters.

Harriet Jones

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Re: To Iron or Not To Iron?
« Reply #55 on: July 29, 2016, 07:09:14 PM »
When you put condiments into bowls, do you put the leftovers back in the container?  If so, are you not worried about cross-contamination?

saki

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Re: To Iron or Not To Iron?
« Reply #56 on: August 01, 2016, 06:57:20 AM »
When you put condiments into bowls, do you put the leftovers back in the container?  If so, are you not worried about cross-contamination?

I only do the condiments in bowls thing when we have guests.  I tend to make sure I don't put too much out - if it's getting low, I'll mention that there is more so people don't stint themselves - if there's much left over, I either store it in the bowl in the fridge until we use it up, or just throw it out if it's not something we use regularly.

To be honest, though, I don't serve much food to guests that requires condiments - only exception being salad dressing, which I always make myself anyway.

Hmmmmm

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Re: To Iron or Not To Iron?
« Reply #57 on: August 01, 2016, 09:12:36 AM »
When you put condiments into bowls, do you put the leftovers back in the container?  If so, are you not worried about cross-contamination?

I don't put it back. But it seems the only condiment I frequently serve to guests is cocktail sauce when serving fried seafood. If I don't make my own then I usually doctor up the bottled version anyway. I can't remember the last time I served a salad that wasn't already dressed with a dressing I made.

I remember when condiments didn't come in squeeze bottles. So if you wanted mustard you used a knife or spoon to get it out. There was a much higher potential for an unclean spoon to end up in your jar. Or ketchup required lots of shaking and could end up on your table or floor. Salad dressings came in bottles with wide mouths and pouring too much into a salad was a high probability that could be reduced is someone used a spoon to add dressing. So movement from original container to a serving bowl was really a better solution. The only condiment I can always remember being served from it's original container was Tabasco sauce.

VorFemme

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Re: To Iron or Not To Iron?
« Reply #58 on: August 01, 2016, 12:05:37 PM »
When you put condiments into bowls, do you put the leftovers back in the container?  If so, are you not worried about cross-contamination?

I don't put it back. But it seems the only condiment I frequently serve to guests is cocktail sauce when serving fried seafood. If I don't make my own then I usually doctor up the bottled version anyway. I can't remember the last time I served a salad that wasn't already dressed with a dressing I made.

I remember when condiments didn't come in squeeze bottles. So if you wanted mustard you used a knife or spoon to get it out. There was a much higher potential for an unclean spoon to end up in your jar. Or ketchup required lots of shaking and could end up on your table or floor. Salad dressings came in bottles with wide mouths and pouring too much into a salad was a high probability that could be reduced is someone used a spoon to add dressing. So movement from original container to a serving bowl was really a better solution. The only condiment I can always remember being served from it's original container was Tabasco sauce.

At least in part because the best way to get a small amount of Tabasco sauce out is to use the bottle, which is designed to give a drop at a time...that stuff is hot!

Do you know why the various camping or military ration packs with Tabasco sauce have a miniature glass bottle of the stuff in the ration pack?  Because only glass survives Tabasco sauce.  The stuff is "hot"...and I am married to a Tabasco sauce addict who really loves the stuff.  And even he only uses a few drops at a time.
Let sleeping dragons be.......morning breath......need I explain?

Margo

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Re: To Iron or Not To Iron?
« Reply #59 on: August 17, 2016, 05:31:50 AM »
The original containers thing would depend on the formality of the meal, for me.

If its just me, then I will have the original container on the table (or may have dished up in the kitchen and put what I want on my plate there)

If I have house guests then they are likely to be very close friends or immediate family so again, normally fiarly informal. If however I was giving a partt, or if I am doing a special meal (chirsitmas dinner, for example) then I will decant dressings etc into separate dishes as it looks nicer - if I have gone to the trouble of using my linen tablecloths (incidentally, this would be one of the few times I'll also have ironed something!) etc then yes, I will also be setting out any condiments in nice dishes, decanting the wine, and so forth.

When we all lived at home, my paretns had a similar system - normal, weekday supper, you might have vegatables drained and brought to the table in the sacepan they were cooked in, and any shop-bought sauces in the jar.
Sunday lunch things would be in seving dishes and if there were guests you'd also have condimetns in separate serving dishes or jugs.

When I was small, we often used to have 'tea' in the evening rather than a cooked meal (so, bread and butter and  various spreads, biscuits, cups of tea) If we served tea when thre were guests then things such as jam or lemon curd would be decnated into smaller dishes with a spoon, rather than being put on the table in the jar.