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Author Topic: You're going to get fat if you eat that!  (Read 12328 times)

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Diane AKA Traska

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Re: You're going to get fat if you eat that!
« Reply #45 on: September 19, 2017, 03:29:49 PM »
I, as a cashier, see all kinds of carts of groceries. I would never, ever food police these carts, I do however, make light of the carts. My customers know I am joking when I say things like "you must be feeding an army" or "where's the party, can I come if I bring rum?" It does irritate me, when people complain about their weight, or how bad their body hurts because of the weight when they are buying only junk food. I only make comments in my head. If someone is buying something that I am unfamiliar with, I will ask about the items. I've asked about fruits and vegies that are common for Hispanic people to buy, what they taste like and how to prepare them. I've asked people about their tea purchase, if it's something I am not familiar with.

We have a lot of body builders in town, plus a small college, and a semipro baseball team. These carts usually have lots of fruit vegies, chicken and protein powder. If someone really can't figure out that the cart is an athletes, then there is something wrong with them. To them, I may ask if it's their turn to feed the team.

To the food police..."I might be fat, but you're ugly, and I can lose weight!"

What if you said that, even jokingly, to someone who lived by themselves? Don't you think that would be hurtful, if they were overweight?

I agree. I really dislike it when cashiers comment on my purchases. I don't say anything because it would likely come off as petty, so the cashiers I encounter who do it probably think it's okay because they think I know they are joking. Yes, I know that, but I dislike it. I'd rather make my purchases and be on my way without being quizzed about the items I am buying or hearing commentary, even joking commentary.

+1 for disliking  cashiers commenting on my purchases.  There is one particular cashier at the store I shop at that commented on the food - every - single - time.  Oh you got tomatoes, what are you going to make.  Oh look you got toilet paper.  Oh - you buy a lot of vegetables, what do you do with them.  I no longer get in her line.  And I complained to management.  Not only did it take her forever to ring up my purchases, but she was looking for me to respond and engage  to her comments.

I can't stand it either. I've said on here (and maybe even in this thread) that my DH is a bodybuilder and I cannot stand the comments on our cart from fellow shoppers and cashiers. From everything to "Do you run an orphanage?" "Do you own a restaurant?" "Are you having a big party?" to, on this last trip, "What are you going to do with all this peanut butter?" (I deadpanned, "Eat it.")

The comments are worse when I'm alone and DH has taken over the majority of the grocery shopping so I don't have to deal with it as much. Trader Joe's cashiers are the worst, IMO. I think they're trained to make small talk and be engaging and I guess commenting on the groceries seems to be the easiest thing, but I just don't want to have that conversation. Let's talk about the weather, the local sports teams, N. Korea, anything but the groceries.

AFAIK, they're instructed to *specifically* talk about the groceries, because it shows they're "engaged" and have "taken an interest" in their customers. That's just creepy in my eyes.
Location:
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NFPwife

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Re: You're going to get fat if you eat that!
« Reply #46 on: September 19, 2017, 08:53:52 PM »

I can't stand it either. I've said on here (and maybe even in this thread) that my DH is a bodybuilder and I cannot stand the comments on our cart from fellow shoppers and cashiers. From everything to "Do you run an orphanage?" "Do you own a restaurant?" "Are you having a big party?" to, on this last trip, "What are you going to do with all this peanut butter?" (I deadpanned, "Eat it.")

The comments are worse when I'm alone and DH has taken over the majority of the grocery shopping so I don't have to deal with it as much. Trader Joe's cashiers are the worst, IMO. I think they're trained to make small talk and be engaging and I guess commenting on the groceries seems to be the easiest thing, but I just don't want to have that conversation. Let's talk about the weather, the local sports teams, N. Korea, anything but the groceries.

AFAIK, they're instructed to *specifically* talk about the groceries, because it shows they're "engaged" and have "taken an interest" in their customers. That's just creepy in my eyes.

Really? I might have to e-mail or tweet corporate. I really don't want to talk about the groceries. When DH and I are there, I'll say, "You go first and deal with the chatter about all this." We have had cashiers who'll say something like, "Did you know we have huge dark chocolate bars at holiday time? They're X pounds." If we're buying dark chocolate or mention something that might work well with an item we bought. That's slightly better than asking what we're doing with the groceries.

Aunt4God

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Re: You're going to get fat if you eat that!
« Reply #47 on: September 19, 2017, 10:54:33 PM »

I can't stand it either. I've said on here (and maybe even in this thread) that my DH is a bodybuilder and I cannot stand the comments on our cart from fellow shoppers and cashiers. From everything to "Do you run an orphanage?" "Do you own a restaurant?" "Are you having a big party?" to, on this last trip, "What are you going to do with all this peanut butter?" (I deadpanned, "Eat it.")

The comments are worse when I'm alone and DH has taken over the majority of the grocery shopping so I don't have to deal with it as much. Trader Joe's cashiers are the worst, IMO. I think they're trained to make small talk and be engaging and I guess commenting on the groceries seems to be the easiest thing, but I just don't want to have that conversation. Let's talk about the weather, the local sports teams, N. Korea, anything but the groceries.

AFAIK, they're instructed to *specifically* talk about the groceries, because it shows they're "engaged" and have "taken an interest" in their customers. That's just creepy in my eyes.

Really? I might have to e-mail or tweet corporate. I really don't want to talk about the groceries. When DH and I are there, I'll say, "You go first and deal with the chatter about all this." We have had cashiers who'll say something like, "Did you know we have huge dark chocolate bars at holiday time? They're X pounds." If we're buying dark chocolate or mention something that might work well with an item we bought. That's slightly better than asking what we're doing with the groceries.

Cashiering isn't as cut and dried, easy peasy as it looks. They have to scan the items, bag them properly, make sure you're not leaving anything in the cart, remember the produce codes (so you don't have to wait for them to look it up), etc. They also have to be cheerful and engage in conversation. Talking about something that's right in front of you is much easier than trying to think of other things to talk about. Yes, they are required to be friendly and talk to each customer. They also have a script of things they must remember to ask about, and some stores require them to upsell a minimum of one item per customer. They can base that upsell on what you're buying to making it easier. The scrip of questions can change with the season, depending on the store, too. They're just trying to do their job and be friendly and cheerful while making it look like they want to be there. It's not as easy as it looks.

Zizi-K

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Re: You're going to get fat if you eat that!
« Reply #48 on: September 19, 2017, 11:17:34 PM »

I can't stand it either. I've said on here (and maybe even in this thread) that my DH is a bodybuilder and I cannot stand the comments on our cart from fellow shoppers and cashiers. From everything to "Do you run an orphanage?" "Do you own a restaurant?" "Are you having a big party?" to, on this last trip, "What are you going to do with all this peanut butter?" (I deadpanned, "Eat it.")

The comments are worse when I'm alone and DH has taken over the majority of the grocery shopping so I don't have to deal with it as much. Trader Joe's cashiers are the worst, IMO. I think they're trained to make small talk and be engaging and I guess commenting on the groceries seems to be the easiest thing, but I just don't want to have that conversation. Let's talk about the weather, the local sports teams, N. Korea, anything but the groceries.

AFAIK, they're instructed to *specifically* talk about the groceries, because it shows they're "engaged" and have "taken an interest" in their customers. That's just creepy in my eyes.

Really? I might have to e-mail or tweet corporate. I really don't want to talk about the groceries. When DH and I are there, I'll say, "You go first and deal with the chatter about all this." We have had cashiers who'll say something like, "Did you know we have huge dark chocolate bars at holiday time? They're X pounds." If we're buying dark chocolate or mention something that might work well with an item we bought. That's slightly better than asking what we're doing with the groceries.

I sometimes find the chatter from TJ's cashiers a bit much. In my experience, their mention of the groceries is usually limited to: have you had this before, I love it! or, have you had this before, I was thinking of trying it!  I have never heard them make any sort of judgement about amounts being purchased, etc.

A lot of times I got in on a Thursday or Friday, and they'll ask me if I have any exciting plans for the weekend. I find that way more off-putting than comments about the food! 

wonderfullyanonymous

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Re: You're going to get fat if you eat that!
« Reply #49 on: September 20, 2017, 11:09:27 AM »

Cashiering isn't as cut and dried, easy peasy as it looks. They have to scan the items, bag them properly, make sure you're not leaving anything in the cart, remember the produce codes (so you don't have to wait for them to look it up), etc. They also have to be cheerful and engage in conversation. Talking about something that's right in front of you is much easier than trying to think of other things to talk about. Yes, they are required to be friendly and talk to each customer. They also have a script of things they must remember to ask about, and some stores require them to upsell a minimum of one item per customer. They can base that upsell on what you're buying to making it easier. The scrip of questions can change with the season, depending on the store, too. They're just trying to do their job and be friendly and cheerful while making it look like they want to be there. It's not as easy as it looks.


As a cashier, thank you for this. The small talk is because people complain we aren't friendly if we don't talk. I can see why it can be a hassle to a customer, but we aren't trying to be your friend, we are trying to be friendly. We are trying to not get into trouble because we aren't smiling or talking. Yes, some cashiers go over board, but in all honesty, I, myself, would rather have an overly chatty, friendly cashier, to one who grunts hello, or doesn't say anything.

I can usually pick up a customers attitude, (not sure if that's the word I want) by how they react to my chatter. I have customers who like to come through my lane because of how I chatter, my sarcasm and my quick witted come backs. The other cashiers also have regular customers. We aren't trying to make friends with our customers, although, sometimes it does happen, just make your shopping experience better. We are supposed to say, "Hello", "Did you find everything you wanted?", make some small talk here, at the end of the transaction, "Do you want to apply for the Walmart Credit Card?" if the customer has a lot of groceries, "Would you like a carry out today?" and then, finally, "Thank you for shopping with us today, and have a great day!"

Diane AKA Traska

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Re: You're going to get fat if you eat that!
« Reply #50 on: September 20, 2017, 11:22:43 AM »

Cashiering isn't as cut and dried, easy peasy as it looks. They have to scan the items, bag them properly, make sure you're not leaving anything in the cart, remember the produce codes (so you don't have to wait for them to look it up), etc. They also have to be cheerful and engage in conversation. Talking about something that's right in front of you is much easier than trying to think of other things to talk about. Yes, they are required to be friendly and talk to each customer. They also have a script of things they must remember to ask about, and some stores require them to upsell a minimum of one item per customer. They can base that upsell on what you're buying to making it easier. The scrip of questions can change with the season, depending on the store, too. They're just trying to do their job and be friendly and cheerful while making it look like they want to be there. It's not as easy as it looks.



As a cashier, thank you for this. The small talk is because people complain we aren't friendly if we don't talk. I can see why it can be a hassle to a customer, but we aren't trying to be your friend, we are trying to be friendly. We are trying to not get into trouble because we aren't smiling or talking. Yes, some cashiers go over board, but in all honesty, I, myself, would rather have an overly chatty, friendly cashier, to one who grunts hello, or doesn't say anything.

I can usually pick up a customers attitude, (not sure if that's the word I want) by how they react to my chatter. I have customers who like to come through my lane because of how I chatter, my sarcasm and my quick witted come backs. The other cashiers also have regular customers. We aren't trying to make friends with our customers, although, sometimes it does happen, just make your shopping experience better. We are supposed to say, "Hello", "Did you find everything you wanted?", make some small talk here, at the end of the transaction, "Do you want to apply for the Walmart Credit Card?" if the customer has a lot of groceries, "Would you like a carry out today?" and then, finally, "Thank you for shopping with us today, and have a great day!"

I'm guessing you can't relay to your superiors that some customers so have an issue with it? I mean, I'm less introverted than I used to be, but even then I'm really only conversing because it's rude not to. In all honesty, I'd rather put the stuff on the belt, pay, and get going. We *do* recognize that it's not your (general you) idea, though. :)
Location:
Philadelphia, PA

Aunt4God

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Re: You're going to get fat if you eat that!
« Reply #51 on: September 20, 2017, 02:34:57 PM »

Cashiering isn't as cut and dried, easy peasy as it looks. They have to scan the items, bag them properly, make sure you're not leaving anything in the cart, remember the produce codes (so you don't have to wait for them to look it up), etc. They also have to be cheerful and engage in conversation. Talking about something that's right in front of you is much easier than trying to think of other things to talk about. Yes, they are required to be friendly and talk to each customer. They also have a script of things they must remember to ask about, and some stores require them to upsell a minimum of one item per customer. They can base that upsell on what you're buying to making it easier. The scrip of questions can change with the season, depending on the store, too. They're just trying to do their job and be friendly and cheerful while making it look like they want to be there. It's not as easy as it looks.



As a cashier, thank you for this. The small talk is because people complain we aren't friendly if we don't talk. I can see why it can be a hassle to a customer, but we aren't trying to be your friend, we are trying to be friendly. We are trying to not get into trouble because we aren't smiling or talking. Yes, some cashiers go over board, but in all honesty, I, myself, would rather have an overly chatty, friendly cashier, to one who grunts hello, or doesn't say anything.

I can usually pick up a customers attitude, (not sure if that's the word I want) by how they react to my chatter. I have customers who like to come through my lane because of how I chatter, my sarcasm and my quick witted come backs. The other cashiers also have regular customers. We aren't trying to make friends with our customers, although, sometimes it does happen, just make your shopping experience better. We are supposed to say, "Hello", "Did you find everything you wanted?", make some small talk here, at the end of the transaction, "Do you want to apply for the Walmart Credit Card?" if the customer has a lot of groceries, "Would you like a carry out today?" and then, finally, "Thank you for shopping with us today, and have a great day!"

I'm guessing you can't relay to your superiors that some customers so have an issue with it? I mean, I'm less introverted than I used to be, but even then I'm really only conversing because it's rude not to. In all honesty, I'd rather put the stuff on the belt, pay, and get going. We *do* recognize that it's not your (general you) idea, though. :)

Honestly, the conversations and the smiles from the customers were the only things that got me through my days. I have a collagen disorder, but didn't have the diagnosis back when I was a cashier. By the time my breaks would hit, I'd be desperate to sit down and get off my feet. The end of my shift couldn't come fast enough. The customers who would chat and be nice to me were the only distraction I had for the pain I was in. If I had had to stand there for eight hours with no one talking to me, just scanning, bagging, exchanging money and moving to the next customer it would have been hell. Cashiering is not a fun job. We're expected to go fast enough that 85% (or more) of our time is spent actually scanning and cashing out. Even if we're sick, tired, emotional problems at home, have a problem customer, need a price scan, none of it mattered. If we dropped below that efficiency percentage, we were put on notice/probation. If it wasn't brought back up, we could be fired. Customers will complain that we talk too much, or that we don't talk enough (I even got both from the same person once.) They'll complain that we bagged too fast, too slow, the wrong way, crumpled their clothes, etc. We can't ever do anything right in the eyes of the customers. You're only in that cashier's lane for a few minutes. I understand being introverted and not wanting to talk, but reading through the complaints here is just disheartening to those who've been behind the register. What would you be saying if a cashier didn't say anything to you, scanned your items (even scanned quickly, perfectly, made no mistakes, etc) and cashed you out and sent you on your way. You say you'd like it, but stop and think about it a minute. You'd probably be brought up short, like, well, THAT cashier was very unfriendly to me. We can't tell by looking at somebody what the perfect amount of chatting will be for that specific customer. You do have to interact with people when you're out in public, and sorry to say, but talking with a cashier is not going to go away.

Diane AKA Traska

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Re: You're going to get fat if you eat that!
« Reply #52 on: September 20, 2017, 02:45:10 PM »

Cashiering isn't as cut and dried, easy peasy as it looks. They have to scan the items, bag them properly, make sure you're not leaving anything in the cart, remember the produce codes (so you don't have to wait for them to look it up), etc. They also have to be cheerful and engage in conversation. Talking about something that's right in front of you is much easier than trying to think of other things to talk about. Yes, they are required to be friendly and talk to each customer. They also have a script of things they must remember to ask about, and some stores require them to upsell a minimum of one item per customer. They can base that upsell on what you're buying to making it easier. The scrip of questions can change with the season, depending on the store, too. They're just trying to do their job and be friendly and cheerful while making it look like they want to be there. It's not as easy as it looks.



As a cashier, thank you for this. The small talk is because people complain we aren't friendly if we don't talk. I can see why it can be a hassle to a customer, but we aren't trying to be your friend, we are trying to be friendly. We are trying to not get into trouble because we aren't smiling or talking. Yes, some cashiers go over board, but in all honesty, I, myself, would rather have an overly chatty, friendly cashier, to one who grunts hello, or doesn't say anything.

I can usually pick up a customers attitude, (not sure if that's the word I want) by how they react to my chatter. I have customers who like to come through my lane because of how I chatter, my sarcasm and my quick witted come backs. The other cashiers also have regular customers. We aren't trying to make friends with our customers, although, sometimes it does happen, just make your shopping experience better. We are supposed to say, "Hello", "Did you find everything you wanted?", make some small talk here, at the end of the transaction, "Do you want to apply for the Walmart Credit Card?" if the customer has a lot of groceries, "Would you like a carry out today?" and then, finally, "Thank you for shopping with us today, and have a great day!"

I'm guessing you can't relay to your superiors that some customers so have an issue with it? I mean, I'm less introverted than I used to be, but even then I'm really only conversing because it's rude not to. In all honesty, I'd rather put the stuff on the belt, pay, and get going. We *do* recognize that it's not your (general you) idea, though. :)

Honestly, the conversations and the smiles from the customers were the only things that got me through my days. I have a collagen disorder, but didn't have the diagnosis back when I was a cashier. By the time my breaks would hit, I'd be desperate to sit down and get off my feet. The end of my shift couldn't come fast enough. The customers who would chat and be nice to me were the only distraction I had for the pain I was in. If I had had to stand there for eight hours with no one talking to me, just scanning, bagging, exchanging money and moving to the next customer it would have been hell. Cashiering is not a fun job. We're expected to go fast enough that 85% (or more) of our time is spent actually scanning and cashing out. Even if we're sick, tired, emotional problems at home, have a problem customer, need a price scan, none of it mattered. If we dropped below that efficiency percentage, we were put on notice/probation. If it wasn't brought back up, we could be fired. Customers will complain that we talk too much, or that we don't talk enough (I even got both from the same person once.) They'll complain that we bagged too fast, too slow, the wrong way, crumpled their clothes, etc. We can't ever do anything right in the eyes of the customers. You're only in that cashier's lane for a few minutes. I understand being introverted and not wanting to talk, but reading through the complaints here is just disheartening to those who've been behind the register. What would you be saying if a cashier didn't say anything to you, scanned your items (even scanned quickly, perfectly, made no mistakes, etc) and cashed you out and sent you on your way. You say you'd like it, but stop and think about it a minute. You'd probably be brought up short, like, well, THAT cashier was very unfriendly to me. We can't tell by looking at somebody what the perfect amount of chatting will be for that specific customer. You do have to interact with people when you're out in public, and sorry to say, but talking with a cashier is not going to go away.

I don't mind small talk... but when I'm buying multiples of something and the cashier says something along the lines of "you must really like [item]"... it makes me feel conspicuous. My instinct (that I've never acted on) is to put some of it back because clearly, I've bought so much that I am now a curiosity. Talk about the SHIELD or Weird Al shirt I'm wearing, the weather, the traffic getting to the store... but please don't comment on my purchases! (I mean, I personally would rather not small talk, but I'm better with it than I used to be.)
Location:
Philadelphia, PA

NFPwife

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Re: You're going to get fat if you eat that!
« Reply #53 on: September 20, 2017, 03:11:31 PM »

Cashiering isn't as cut and dried, easy peasy as it looks. They have to scan the items, bag them properly, make sure you're not leaving anything in the cart, remember the produce codes (so you don't have to wait for them to look it up), etc. They also have to be cheerful and engage in conversation. Talking about something that's right in front of you is much easier than trying to think of other things to talk about. Yes, they are required to be friendly and talk to each customer. They also have a script of things they must remember to ask about, and some stores require them to upsell a minimum of one item per customer. They can base that upsell on what you're buying to making it easier. The scrip of questions can change with the season, depending on the store, too. They're just trying to do their job and be friendly and cheerful while making it look like they want to be there. It's not as easy as it looks.



As a cashier, thank you for this. The small talk is because people complain we aren't friendly if we don't talk. I can see why it can be a hassle to a customer, but we aren't trying to be your friend, we are trying to be friendly. We are trying to not get into trouble because we aren't smiling or talking. Yes, some cashiers go over board, but in all honesty, I, myself, would rather have an overly chatty, friendly cashier, to one who grunts hello, or doesn't say anything.

I can usually pick up a customers attitude, (not sure if that's the word I want) by how they react to my chatter. I have customers who like to come through my lane because of how I chatter, my sarcasm and my quick witted come backs. The other cashiers also have regular customers. We aren't trying to make friends with our customers, although, sometimes it does happen, just make your shopping experience better. We are supposed to say, "Hello", "Did you find everything you wanted?", make some small talk here, at the end of the transaction, "Do you want to apply for the Walmart Credit Card?" if the customer has a lot of groceries, "Would you like a carry out today?" and then, finally, "Thank you for shopping with us today, and have a great day!"

I'm guessing you can't relay to your superiors that some customers so have an issue with it? I mean, I'm less introverted than I used to be, but even then I'm really only conversing because it's rude not to. In all honesty, I'd rather put the stuff on the belt, pay, and get going. We *do* recognize that it's not your (general you) idea, though. :)

Honestly, the conversations and the smiles from the customers were the only things that got me through my days. I have a collagen disorder, but didn't have the diagnosis back when I was a cashier. By the time my breaks would hit, I'd be desperate to sit down and get off my feet. The end of my shift couldn't come fast enough. The customers who would chat and be nice to me were the only distraction I had for the pain I was in. If I had had to stand there for eight hours with no one talking to me, just scanning, bagging, exchanging money and moving to the next customer it would have been hell. Cashiering is not a fun job. We're expected to go fast enough that 85% (or more) of our time is spent actually scanning and cashing out. Even if we're sick, tired, emotional problems at home, have a problem customer, need a price scan, none of it mattered. If we dropped below that efficiency percentage, we were put on notice/probation. If it wasn't brought back up, we could be fired. Customers will complain that we talk too much, or that we don't talk enough (I even got both from the same person once.) They'll complain that we bagged too fast, too slow, the wrong way, crumpled their clothes, etc. We can't ever do anything right in the eyes of the customers. You're only in that cashier's lane for a few minutes. I understand being introverted and not wanting to talk, but reading through the complaints here is just disheartening to those who've been behind the register. What would you be saying if a cashier didn't say anything to you, scanned your items (even scanned quickly, perfectly, made no mistakes, etc) and cashed you out and sent you on your way. You say you'd like it, but stop and think about it a minute. You'd probably be brought up short, like, well, THAT cashier was very unfriendly to me. We can't tell by looking at somebody what the perfect amount of chatting will be for that specific customer. You do have to interact with people when you're out in public, and sorry to say, but talking with a cashier is not going to go away.

I don't mind small talk... but when I'm buying multiples of something and the cashier says something along the lines of "you must really like [item]"... it makes me feel conspicuous. My instinct (that I've never acted on) is to put some of it back because clearly, I've bought so much that I am now a curiosity. Talk about the SHIELD or Weird Al shirt I'm wearing, the weather, the traffic getting to the store... but please don't comment on my purchases! (I mean, I personally would rather not small talk, but I'm better with it than I used to be.)

I'm with Diane, I don't mind small talk either, I mind small talk about my groceries. At the risk of being immodest, I'm great at small talk and will engage the cashier, if... s/he hasn't actively disengaged me with chatter about the groceries. Like Diane, I don't like becoming a curiosity -- or more of one because this has likely happened a couple times through the store.

I was a cashier, also, and I don't ever remember relying on grocery chitchat to engage customers.

Luci

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Re: You're going to get fat if you eat that!
« Reply #54 on: September 20, 2017, 04:36:28 PM »
One thing a previous poster said was about upselling. I can't imagine a cashier scanning and bagging and saying, "Oo. You are getting mustard. Have you tried the super hot, or the hot dog mix with mustard, relish, and onions already mixed?" Then waiting for me to run to get it, or calling for someone to pick it up for me. That would take a bit of time off her speed and I read somewhere that is important, too. It would also irritate the people behind me.

So how can a Walmart cashier be required to upsell?

Once I was buying bras and the clerk kept insisting that I needed panties to match, even asking my husband if that would be nice! That was four times, so I left the counter without anything except a "no" as I walked out. I understood the first time she offered, but I thought one polite "No, thank you" was sufficient. I don't even think I was rude. Curt, but not rude. They were nice bras, though. Sigh.

Harriet Jones

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Re: You're going to get fat if you eat that!
« Reply #55 on: September 20, 2017, 08:22:16 PM »

I don't mind small talk... but when I'm buying multiples of something and the cashier says something along the lines of "you must really like [item]"... it makes me feel conspicuous. My instinct (that I've never acted on) is to put some of it back because clearly, I've bought so much that I am now a curiosity. Talk about the SHIELD or Weird Al shirt I'm wearing, the weather, the traffic getting to the store... but please don't comment on my purchases! (I mean, I personally would rather not small talk, but I'm better with it than I used to be.)

Me too.  I don't mind most of the small talk like "Oh I like this" or "Have you tried X", but don't make comments about how much I'm buying. 


wonderfullyanonymous

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Re: You're going to get fat if you eat that!
« Reply #56 on: September 21, 2017, 09:30:58 AM »

So how can a Walmart cashier be required to upsell?


We are not required to upsell. We don't work on commision, we have a salary. That was a cashier that was way too overboard.


I'm guessing you can't relay to your superiors that some customers so have an issue with it? I mean, I'm less introverted than I used to be, but even then I'm really only conversing because it's rude not to. In all honesty, I'd rather put the stuff on the belt, pay, and get going. We *do* recognize that it's not your (general you) idea, though. :)


We can talk to the supervisors all we want about this, but they don't listen. If customers want changes, they need to do the surveys.



I don't mind small talk... but when I'm buying multiples of something and the cashier says something along the lines of "you must really like [item]"... it makes me feel conspicuous. My instinct (that I've never acted on) is to put some of it back because clearly, I've bought so much that I am now a curiosity. Talk about the SHIELD or Weird Al shirt I'm wearing, the weather, the traffic getting to the store... but please don't comment on my purchases! (I mean, I personally would rather not small talk, but I'm better with it than I used to be.)



Me too.  I don't mind most of the small talk like "Oh I like this" or "Have you tried X", but don't make comments about how much I'm buying. 


We are in a college town, there are also several high schools in the area, and a situated on the cusp of a major interstate and an intrastate. In the summer, we have graduation parties, concerts, Jimmy Buffet fans are AWESOME, and those we recognize from years of them stopping. For the most part, all of us cashiers joke with these customers. For example, if I bring the Bacardi, can I come? If a customer is buying something new to the store, or something I'd like to try, I might ask about that item. If you buy 12 jars of peanut butter, I might say, I like peanut butter too, or ask if it's on sale. I might ask if you are making peanut butter cookie, and add that peanut butter cookies are my favorite.

The college is not a state college so we have a higher international student count. There is always some type of small talk going on with them, as they want to know about the area. There is also a food company that has a lot of international business, and they will also ask about the area. We also talk about where they are from.

This is why I like to make small talk with people. I learn a lot, can pick up some of the nuances of the languages. My regular customers get full blown conversations. There are also regular customers who we watch out for. I think if we weren't as personable as we are, we wouldn't have the customer base we have. We also get customers who come to our store, even if they have a store closer to them, because, in their words, we are nicer and easier to get along with.

Sometimes people will come in dressed to the nines, and pick up fried chicken and sides, 9 times out of 10, they are coming in after a funeral, and picking up food for the reception afterwards. This is where I keep things simple. "Hi, how is your day going?" and maybe "Did you remember to get every thing you needed?" If the customer wants to engage more after that, I leave it up to them.


Harriet Jones

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Re: You're going to get fat if you eat that!
« Reply #57 on: September 21, 2017, 10:04:01 AM »




I don't mind small talk... but when I'm buying multiples of something and the cashier says something along the lines of "you must really like [item]"... it makes me feel conspicuous. My instinct (that I've never acted on) is to put some of it back because clearly, I've bought so much that I am now a curiosity. Talk about the SHIELD or Weird Al shirt I'm wearing, the weather, the traffic getting to the store... but please don't comment on my purchases! (I mean, I personally would rather not small talk, but I'm better with it than I used to be.)



Me too.  I don't mind most of the small talk like "Oh I like this" or "Have you tried X", but don't make comments about how much I'm buying. 


We are in a college town, there are also several high schools in the area, and a situated on the cusp of a major interstate and an intrastate. In the summer, we have graduation parties, concerts, Jimmy Buffet fans are AWESOME, and those we recognize from years of them stopping. For the most part, all of us cashiers joke with these customers. For example, if I bring the Bacardi, can I come? If a customer is buying something new to the store, or something I'd like to try, I might ask about that item. If you buy 12 jars of peanut butter, I might say, I like peanut butter too, or ask if it's on sale. I might ask if you are making peanut butter cookie, and add that peanut butter cookies are my favorite.

The college is not a state college so we have a higher international student count. There is always some type of small talk going on with them, as they want to know about the area. There is also a food company that has a lot of international business, and they will also ask about the area. We also talk about where they are from.

This is why I like to make small talk with people. I learn a lot, can pick up some of the nuances of the languages. My regular customers get full blown conversations. There are also regular customers who we watch out for. I think if we weren't as personable as we are, we wouldn't have the customer base we have. We also get customers who come to our store, even if they have a store closer to them, because, in their words, we are nicer and easier to get along with.
 

It was a while ago, but a cashier once mocked me for buying a large amount of a certain item.  It did not come across as friendly banter.  If I was a regular customer, it might have come across differently, but I really don't care for that kind of comment if I don't know who you are.

Diane AKA Traska

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Re: You're going to get fat if you eat that!
« Reply #58 on: September 21, 2017, 10:21:04 AM »

I'm guessing you can't relay to your superiors that some customers so have an issue with it? I mean, I'm less introverted than I used to be, but even then I'm really only conversing because it's rude not to. In all honesty, I'd rather put the stuff on the belt, pay, and get going. We *do* recognize that it's not your (general you) idea, though. :)


We can talk to the supervisors all we want about this, but they don't listen. If customers want changes, they need to do the surveys.

And now we reach the customer catch-22. We're all familiar with the concept that if there's anything less than a stellar, glowing review, then management comes down on the worker like a ton of bricks. So, if we complain about something that's not the worker's fault on a survey, they get in trouble. If we don't complain, nothing gets fixed.

Long story short, businesses need to stop looking at a 9.999999999999 out of 10 as a failure.
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Philadelphia, PA

jayhawk

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Re: You're going to get fat if you eat that!
« Reply #59 on: September 21, 2017, 01:46:39 PM »
Here's the thing that I find equal parts amusing / aggravating - most food police that I know are all information and judgement and very little personal application. So, while they are on their third glass of wine, they're criticizing the caffeine in my tea. Or telling me how bad the artificial sweetener in my tea is while they scarf a slice of pie for dessert. I use silence as well. Sometimes a pointed look at their plate glass if I'm feeling spicy or things have gone on too long -- that's usually met with a "I'm being bad today, I'll be good starting 'X'." Ohhhhh......
Interesting observation! I remember I was eating a single fun-sized chocolate bar, and my flatmate at the time lectured me about it, while she was smoking a cigarette. I wasn't even close to overweight at the time, and took a lot of exercise (I wish I was that fit and healthy now!). It was a long time ago but it stayed with me because...well...!

That reminds of me the time I was at a Renaissance Festival, standing in a food line. Two young ladies were standing in front of me, talking to each other. I overheard them complain about how disgusting it was to eat turkey legs - meat, how horrible! All the while smoking ciggies.  Now, I totally respect vegetarians and vegans, but I just found it ironic how they were ok to engage in what most others think is an unhealthy habit while disparaging what they thought was another one.