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  • November 24, 2017, 12:59:56 PM

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Author Topic: "Solve the puzzle, win a drink"  (Read 2801 times)

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EllenS

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Re: "Solve the puzzle, win a drink"
« Reply #15 on: August 03, 2017, 03:12:56 PM »
If I were the bride, I would expect that at some point people would share the password with people who hadn't finished the game. In my mind, the point is to have fun at the wedding - if somebody either doesn't like games, or simply couldn't figure that particular game out, what harm is there in somebody sharing the password with them? It's different if somebody is, a) obnoxiously sharing the password with everybody, including people who don't want it, or b) whining to all about wanting the password and not wanting to do the game, but in those cases it's the behavior that's the issue, not getting a "special" drink.

Because the special cocktail is the prize. It's a tangible expression of "bragging rights" that you won the game.

If the prize were a certain kind of silly hat, or a plastic medal on a ribbon, wouldn't it be childish and petty for a guest to cheat just to get one?

If a guest doesn't want to go along with the spirit of the game, they can opt out. But why should they opt out and demand a prize?

It's not about causing harm to the hosts, it's about being such a poor sport that everyone else would be embarrassed for you.

If someone wanted the drink that badly, instead of perpetrating some kind of ruse, I'd just hand over my glass (along with an eye-roll).

Two Ravens

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Re: "Solve the puzzle, win a drink"
« Reply #16 on: August 03, 2017, 03:20:00 PM »
I certainly wouldn't not be embarrassed for anyone that asked for the answer, or think they were a poor sport.

It's a silly game and a silly prize, nothing to get upset over. I'd worry about people who took it too seriously. Like those women who engage in full tackle football over the bouquet.

If the point of the game is to get people to mingle, then that would still be accomplished by asking.
« Last Edit: August 03, 2017, 03:24:09 PM by Two Ravens »

gellchom

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Re: "Solve the puzzle, win a drink"
« Reply #17 on: August 03, 2017, 04:05:46 PM »
If I were the bride, I would expect that at some point people would share the password with people who hadn't finished the game. In my mind, the point is to have fun at the wedding - if somebody either doesn't like games, or simply couldn't figure that particular game out, what harm is there in somebody sharing the password with them? It's different if somebody is, a) obnoxiously sharing the password with everybody, including people who don't want it, or b) whining to all about wanting the password and not wanting to do the game, but in those cases it's the behavior that's the issue, not getting a "special" drink.

The bolded is the key, in my opinion.

If I were the bride (or groom or host), I don't think I'd care, either.

But I'm not.  I'm a guest.  And so it's not up to me to decide to change things to the way I would do them or that I would not care about.  Maybe for some reason this would really bother the hosts, even though it wouldn't bother me.  It simply isn't for me as a guest to decide what the point of the activity is and that I can do whatever I want because it's "nothing to get upset over."  We may well all think that, but that doesn't give us a pass to change or "fix" things.

After all, if the hosts don't care, then they can tell the password to some or all guests, or instruct the bartenders not to require it.

The point is that it just doesn't matter what would or wouldn't bother us, or whether a guest would be silly for wanting the drink if they didn't "earn" it, or whether the host would be silly for caring if someone told the password.  It is the hosts' party and their plan.  Thinking it's silly to care does not excuse interfering.
« Last Edit: August 03, 2017, 04:11:34 PM by gellchom »

Belle

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Re: "Solve the puzzle, win a drink"
« Reply #18 on: August 04, 2017, 11:37:02 AM »
I certainly wouldn't not be embarrassed for anyone that asked for the answer, or think they were a poor sport.

It's a silly game and a silly prize, nothing to get upset over. I'd worry about people who took it too seriously. Like those women who engage in full tackle football over the bouquet.

If the point of the game is to get people to mingle, then that would still be accomplished by asking.

Two Ravens, I fall into this same camp. I might feel differently if this were an event where a game is THE main event vs. part of a bigger event (e.g., if somebody were cheating at a pub trivia night), but I wouldn't take the game that seriously when it's a method of entertaining guests at a wedding. When you're hosting an event, you're supposed to try (to a reasonable extent) to create an event that your guests enjoy. Being upset over somebody having the special drink when they didn't manage to finish the game feels like it's in the opposite spirit of that.

LifeOnPluto

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Re: "Solve the puzzle, win a drink"
« Reply #19 on: August 05, 2017, 01:42:15 AM »
I think the Special Cocktail prize is a bit of a red herring. If it was something like couldn't be replicated (like a trophy, or a funny hat, as someone suggested), I'm sure most would agree that someone who didn't win the game (or didn't even participate) shouldn't be entitled to ask for it simply because they want it.

So yes, I think it would be rude for a non-winner to ask for the password (or a winner to announce the password to all and sundry - it's quite possible that the HC didn't budget for every guest to have a special cocktail).

TeamBhakta

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Re: "Solve the puzzle, win a drink"
« Reply #20 on: August 05, 2017, 07:54:32 AM »
I think the Special Cocktail prize is a bit of a red herring. If it was something like couldn't be replicated (like a trophy, or a funny hat, as someone suggested), I'm sure most would agree that someone who didn't win the game (or didn't even participate) shouldn't be entitled to ask for it simply because they want it.

So yes, I think it would be rude for a non-winner to ask for the password (or a winner to announce the password to all and sundry - it's quite possible that the HC didn't budget for every guest to have a special cocktail).

That would be rather odd budgeting. ???

betty

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Re: "Solve the puzzle, win a drink"
« Reply #21 on: August 09, 2017, 03:42:05 PM »
From the photos, it looks like the puzzles were a kind of scavenger hunt to find out fun facts about the bride & groom, and to act as an icebreaker with other guests.

Because of that, I think it would go against the spirit of the thing to just give out the secret answer so that others can get a drink. However, if more than one guest worked together to solve the puzzles, or introduced themselves to people they didn't yet know to ask for help with some of the questions, that would be more in the spirit of the game.

kudeebee

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Re: "Solve the puzzle, win a drink"
« Reply #22 on: August 12, 2017, 12:20:43 AM »
Wedding guests include such a wide range of people that I don't think there can be an activity that everyone enjoys. All age groups and so many different interests are there. For example, one SIL doesn't like puzzles, I enjoy them on my own time when I won't get distracted, and nephew gets obnoxiously competitive. After a short time when any who wanted to play had time to solve the puzzle and no one would get mad about "spoilers," slipping the password out would be perfectly fine. I would be more likely to not bother because I don't like mixed drinks anyway and would rather concentrate on other things. People would drift into teams, so it might be fun in that way for some.

It might work better in a more homogeneous group for a different type of gathering.

I agree with the bolded.  I don't think I would care for this type of activity at a wedding, especially if I didn't know about it beforehand.

I think this is a know-your-audience type of thing.  Not everyone is into games.  Not everyone wants to mingle with everyone else at a wedding/event.

Is it rude to give out the password--no.  But it could be a "party pooper" type of move as someone else has mentioned.

lowspark

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Re: "Solve the puzzle, win a drink"
« Reply #23 on: August 14, 2017, 08:00:37 AM »
Wedding guests include such a wide range of people that I don't think there can be an activity that everyone enjoys. All age groups and so many different interests are there. For example, one SIL doesn't like puzzles, I enjoy them on my own time when I won't get distracted, and nephew gets obnoxiously competitive. After a short time when any who wanted to play had time to solve the puzzle and no one would get mad about "spoilers," slipping the password out would be perfectly fine. I would be more likely to not bother because I don't like mixed drinks anyway and would rather concentrate on other things. People would drift into teams, so it might be fun in that way for some.

It might work better in a more homogeneous group for a different type of gathering.

I agree with the bolded.  I don't think I would care for this type of activity at a wedding, especially if I didn't know about it beforehand.

I think this is a know-your-audience type of thing. Not everyone is into games.  Not everyone wants to mingle with everyone else at a wedding/event.

Is it rude to give out the password--no.  But it could be a "party pooper" type of move as someone else has mentioned.

Regarding the bolded, I've been in situations, not necessarily at a wedding, where there is some kind of activity that everyone is expected to participate in, but that just didn't appeal to me. In that case, there are two choices, you either suck it up and join in anyway, or you can politely decline and just sit and socialize with the others (and there usually are others) who also don't want to participate.

If you don't participate though, then you just resign yourself to the idea that you don't get to partake of the results of the game. So... no "special cocktail" for you. Unless, that is, the HC ends up offering it to everyone anyway at the end, which, I would suspect, is probably what ended up happening. I would just expect that after a certain amount of time passed, the bar would just open up the special cocktail to the general crowd.

But regardless of that, if you choose not to participate, I think it would be pretty rude to try to solicit the secret password from others who did participate. And by the same token, if you are one of the participants, why go against the spirit of the game by revealing the answer to others? If they are participating, then you've spoiled their fun by not allowing them to discover it on their own. And if they aren't participating then, again, that's their choice and the consequences are theirs to deal with, not yours.
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gramma dishes

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Re: "Solve the puzzle, win a drink"
« Reply #24 on: August 14, 2017, 10:44:44 AM »
Normally I loathe 'games' at wedding related events, but the pictures indicate that this is more or less a group effort with people working in pairs (or more) to solve the puzzle.  It actually looks like fun.  Since no one seemed to be working independently, I'm reasonably sure everyone who participated "won".

mime

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Re: "Solve the puzzle, win a drink"
« Reply #25 on: August 14, 2017, 11:54:46 AM »
Wedding guests include such a wide range of people that I don't think there can be an activity that everyone enjoys. All age groups and so many different interests are there. For example, one SIL doesn't like puzzles, I enjoy them on my own time when I won't get distracted, and nephew gets obnoxiously competitive. After a short time when any who wanted to play had time to solve the puzzle and no one would get mad about "spoilers," slipping the password out would be perfectly fine. I would be more likely to not bother because I don't like mixed drinks anyway and would rather concentrate on other things. People would drift into teams, so it might be fun in that way for some.

It might work better in a more homogeneous group for a different type of gathering.

I agree with the bolded.  I don't think I would care for this type of activity at a wedding, especially if I didn't know about it beforehand.

I think this is a know-your-audience type of thing. Not everyone is into games.  Not everyone wants to mingle with everyone else at a wedding/event.

Is it rude to give out the password--no.  But it could be a "party pooper" type of move as someone else has mentioned.

Regarding the bolded, I've been in situations, not necessarily at a wedding, where there is some kind of activity that everyone is expected to participate in, but that just didn't appeal to me. In that case, there are two choices, you either suck it up and join in anyway, or you can politely decline and just sit and socialize with the others (and there usually are others) who also don't want to participate.

If you don't participate though, then you just resign yourself to the idea that you don't get to partake of the results of the game. So... no "special cocktail" for you. Unless, that is, the HC ends up offering it to everyone anyway at the end, which, I would suspect, is probably what ended up happening. I would just expect that after a certain amount of time passed, the bar would just open up the special cocktail to the general crowd.

But regardless of that, if you choose not to participate, I think it would be pretty rude to try to solicit the secret password from others who did participate. And by the same token, if you are one of the participants, why go against the spirit of the game by revealing the answer to others? If they are participating, then you've spoiled their fun by not allowing them to discover it on their own. And if they aren't participating then, again, that's their choice and the consequences are theirs to deal with, not yours.

I attended a wedding reception where they had an air guitar contest. Not surprisingly, most people didn't participate. Everyone who joined in at all got a 6-pack of a well-loved local brew. There was plenty on beer tap at the bar for the rest of the guests. Anyone trying to get the 'prize' without playing would have come across pretty special.

The OP situation looks a little different to me in that this puzzlehunt could have had more participants-- not just a brave handful as in the air guitar show. Also, the prize was probably less costly. I don't think either of those changes my opinion.