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Author Topic: Easter Etiquette  (Read 3973 times)

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menley

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Re: Easter Etiquette
« Reply #30 on: April 10, 2018, 10:35:38 PM »
Am I reading correctly that the kids are as young as 1 and you want them all to sit for 30 minutes?

My son is almost two and struggles to sit at the table longer than 5-10 minutes. Based on my conversations with other parents, his teachers, and his pediatrician, this is completely normal.

Older children, certainly. But I would say this is an unrealistic expectation for children under, say, 5 or 6.

Hmmmmm

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Re: Easter Etiquette
« Reply #31 on: April 11, 2018, 08:57:21 AM »
Am I reading correctly that the kids are as young as 1 and you want them all to sit for 30 minutes?

My son is almost two and struggles to sit at the table longer than 5-10 minutes. Based on my conversations with other parents, his teachers, and his pediatrician, this is completely normal.

Older children, certainly. But I would say this is an unrealistic expectation for children under, say, 5 or 6.

You can have different rules for the under 2's and the older ones. I know in our family, no parent is going to let the under 2's out of their site when visiting so if the under 2's left the table, a parent or another adult is going with them.

But I've always found it surprising when people don't think little ones can be entertained and in a good mood while sitting down for 30 min. Do these kids never spend more than 30 minutes driving? Or do they not go out to dinner with their families? We have little one sitting for 30 minutes all the time. The last time I visited my nephew and his wife and son, we went to a brunch after church and his wild 2 year old, sat through the entire more than an hour brunch.

My newest grandniece  who turned 1 in December sat in a highchair for 30 minutes snacking and interacting with the others at a restaurant last Friday, then took a little walk on the patio area with her mom, came back and sat for another 20 to 30 minute while we all had dessert. She then did another little walk with me and then back to the highchair while we were all closing out our tabs. All in all, we were at this restaurant for over 2 hours.  At Easter, she sat through the meal eating and interacting with everyone.

Both of my kids were perfectly capable of sitting at a restaurant table throughout an entire meal. Yes, they got lots of attention, but their bottoms were still in the high chair unless there was a complete meltdown and then we left anyway.

The only kids in our family that I remember there being problem with sitting through a meal was a cousin who never had her kids sit down to eat. They were served their meals on a small table in the family room and were allowed to wander around while eating. (Her 2 sons are now in their late 20's and are wonderful but I still remember always being afraid that I was going to step on a mushy cheerio or sit on a half eaten sandwich square at their house as not all the food made it back to the table or was consumed.)

bopper

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Re: Easter Etiquette
« Reply #32 on: April 13, 2018, 02:09:46 PM »
Thoughts:
1) Make sure all the adults know ahead of time when you want to do a formal sit down dinner.
2) Organize things so that kids can't get at the food before

MrTango

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Re: Easter Etiquette
« Reply #33 on: April 20, 2018, 07:55:20 AM »
Thoughts:
1) Make sure all the adults know ahead of time when you want to do a formal sit down dinner.
2) Organize things so that kids can't get at the food before

I totally agree.  It might be necessary to either do a plated meal or to not allow anyone into the dining room until it is time for everyone to sit down to eat.