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  • June 01, 2016, 01:09:15 AM

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Author Topic: Historical Recipes  (Read 315 times)

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Purpley

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Historical Recipes
« on: May 30, 2016, 12:39:03 AM »
Oops, I posted this is entertaining and hospitality, which is the wrong thread. Apologies for duplicates, not sure how to delete the original.


I am looking for suggestions for weird, unique, or possibly historically significant recipes. I am a volunteer with a speaking group that puts together short talks from the more bizarre corners of history, science, or technology -- and they're having a pot luck next week! So I want to collect recipe ideas.

For example: Nostradamus, in addition to his prophecies, also published a cherry jam recipe (someone is already bringing Nostradamus Cherry Jam).

Anyone know of interesting recipes? Dishes served at King Henry VIIIs wedding? Military victory feasts? Roman recipes of good fortune?

Thanks!

Katana_Geldar

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Re: Historical Recipes
« Reply #1 on: May 30, 2016, 01:55:14 AM »
Roman cheesecake or libum.

http://www.food.com/recipe/modern-roman-libum-recipe-or-roman-cheesecake-211774

I've made these, they're nice and don't forget the fresh bay leaves!

Psychopoesie

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Re: Historical Recipes
« Reply #2 on: May 30, 2016, 02:17:08 AM »
Roman cheesecake or libum.

http://www.food.com/recipe/modern-roman-libum-recipe-or-roman-cheesecake-211774

I've made these, they're nice and don't forget the fresh bay leaves!

Those look great. May have to give it a go. Mum has a huge bay tree so fresh leaves are always available.

Katana_Geldar

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Re: Historical Recipes
« Reply #3 on: May 30, 2016, 03:41:27 AM »
This is also good, Alsatian cheese tart. It's French.

http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/alsatian-cheese-tart-233788


cicero

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Re: Historical Recipes
« Reply #4 on: May 30, 2016, 04:33:39 AM »
I've never actually made anything from here, but when i visited mt. vernon last year, i picked up a bunch of "recipe cards" that they had there . I found an online link to these recipes:

http://www.mountvernon.org/recipes

Another

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camlan

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Re: Historical Recipes
« Reply #5 on: May 30, 2016, 07:22:10 AM »
The early colonists in the US relied heavily on pumpkins for food: https://www.history.org/Foundation/journal/Autumn09/pumpkins.cfm . There's a recipe for stewed pumpkin here: http://familydoctormag.com/recipes/11/116-colonial-stewed-pumpkin-easy.html .

It's not fancy, but the history of bread is more interesting than you might think. It's one of the oldest foods, and the discovery of yeast to make bread rise seems to be related to the discovery that yeast can ferment beer, another simple, but important foodstuff. Bread baking was highly regulated in the Middle Ages, to keep bakers from cheating their customers, and there was a class structure to bread--the poor could only afford coarse, brown bread, while the rich could afford white bread, or pandemayne. http://www.godecookery.com/goderec/grec28.htm There's a recipe on that page, and if you bring bread, there will be something to spread that cherry jam on.

Nothing is impossible, the word itself says, Im possible! Audrey Hepburn


rose red

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Re: Historical Recipes
« Reply #6 on: May 30, 2016, 09:58:38 AM »
When I read the Little House on the Prairie books, Mas vanity cakes sound fascinating. There are recipes online but I dont know how easy or difficult they are to make (it involves lard).

In Farmer Boy, apples-and-onions and birds nest pudding also peaked my interest.

Hmmmmm

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Re: Historical Recipes
« Reply #7 on: May 30, 2016, 11:08:43 AM »
This site has a few recipes from ancient to more recent (Thomas Jefferson) times that have been adjusted to allow preparation with today's ingredients.

http://www.delish.com/cooking/g2059/food-history-old-recipes/?slide=10

Purpley

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Re: Historical Recipes
« Reply #8 on: May 30, 2016, 02:04:56 PM »
These are great! Thank you!

nutraxfornerves

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Re: Historical Recipes
« Reply #9 on: May 30, 2016, 02:36:49 PM »
The British Library has an online collection of old cookbooks. Books for Cooks that includes some recipes.

How about a recipe from Mrs. Beeton's,one of the most significant British cookbooks?

Or from Apicius, author of the oldest known collection of recipes?

For Louisa May Alcott fans--pickled limes. Amy's were probably imported from the West Indies. Mrs. Beeton has recipe for pickled lemons that would do. Food Timeline has several. http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodfaq2.html#pickledlimes

There is always oatmeal. When I toured in Central many years ago, the food served at hotels was mostly bad Russian cooking. I saw a lot of oatmeal on menus, just not at breakfast. It was served as a sort of savory starch. The oddest was oatmeal with tomatoes and horseradish served for lunch by our tour cook. I don't think anyone but the crew ate it; they loved it.

Nutrax
The plural of anecdote is not data

Kimberami

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Re: Historical Recipes
« Reply #10 on: Yesterday at 11:43:54 AM »
I found this site
http://community.tasteofhome.com/community_forums/f/30/t/82337.aspx
It's recipes from First Ladies of the United States.
 
This site looks fun.  It's supposed to be recipes from the time of King Henry VIII.
http://www.sixwives.info/tudor-food-recipes.htm
Oh Rocky!

blarg314

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Re: Historical Recipes
« Reply #11 on: Yesterday at 08:12:45 PM »

I did a Roman Banquet a few months ago, with recipes adapted from Apicius, that worked really well. If you're interested, I could post a couple of the most successful ones.

If you want to go all out, make a centerpiece dish worthy of a Medieval banquet - say, a roasted swan with the whole skin and feathers put back on after cooking. Or a giant pie filled with live birds that fly out when you cut it.


Katana_Geldar

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Re: Historical Recipes
« Reply #12 on: Yesterday at 09:44:13 PM »
Romans had a fermented fish sauce called garum which they had with everything. And I mean everything, including dessert. Closest equivalent may be Worcestershire Sauce.

greencat

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Re: Historical Recipes
« Reply #13 on: Yesterday at 11:07:25 PM »
This YouTube channel has a lot of 18th/19th century recipes and techniques.  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCxr2d4As312LulcajAkKJYw