Author Topic: Eating on the cheap  (Read 1128 times)

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Katana_Geldar

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Re: Eating on the cheap
« Reply #15 on: August 03, 2014, 10:57:48 PM »
Mushroom soup! This is how DH get by when we  haven't got much money and we usually have stock in the house.

magician5

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Re: Eating on the cheap
« Reply #16 on: August 03, 2014, 11:15:12 PM »
Ramen, but eat it as the Asians do: a bit less of the spice packet, add chopped scallions, any meat (fake crab chunks), anything you find on youtube ramen videos, and immediately when you put it in a bowl top with a raw egg (hot broth cooks the egg).
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cicero

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Re: Eating on the cheap
« Reply #17 on: August 04, 2014, 05:37:30 AM »
anything with beans and rice/pasta (plus small amounts of meat if you need it).

I use a lot of chicken because it's relatively cheap here - i buy whatever parts are on sale (except the legs, not my favorite part). I often make whole roast chickens, cool, and then take all the chicken off the bones, chop and freeze in ziplock bags (that way i always have chicken to add to stir fry, salad, etc. for *me* (and YMMV), if i have a piece or cup of chicken, that keep me going longer and better than a salad or vegetarian meal. sometimes i'll buy an cheap inexpensive cut of beef and throw it in the slow cooker and then shred. (as it starts to freeze, shake the bag a few times so the pieces don't clump together).

Oatmeal, eggs, tuna

depending on what's available in your area - check out what is cheaper between fresh or canned/frozen. Where i live, fresh in-season produce is much cheaper than frozen/canned. Also -make "from scratch" foods (like cake, cookies, tomato sauce etc) may be cheaper than buying convenince.

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Margo

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Re: Eating on the cheap
« Reply #18 on: August 04, 2014, 08:21:12 AM »
most recipies that use minced beef (ground beef?) you an make using red lentils in place of the meat (or some of it) which keeps the cost down. I would suggest using about 1/3 meat to 2/3 lentils if you are used to using all beef.

look for vegetarian recipies - often cheaper than the meat equivalents

If you have a freezer, then it is worth cooking in bulk and freezing in 1 meal size portions. You can also go shopping a the end of the day and looking for stuff which has been marked down - you can then cook and freeze.

Another easy option is to reduce the amount of meat (which tens to be relatively expensive) and increase the amount of rice/potato/vegetable in any given meal,

SamiHami

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Re: Eating on the cheap
« Reply #19 on: August 04, 2014, 10:30:41 AM »
My favourite site: www,budgetbytes.com. Every recipe I've tried has worked, she breaks down the cost of each ingredient and makes a lot of interesting suggestions.

Oh my, I'm afraid I'll be lost on that site for hours. Wow!

What have you got? Is it food? Is it for me? I want it whatever it is!

Bobbie

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Re: Eating on the cheap
« Reply #20 on: August 04, 2014, 12:39:27 PM »
Ramen, but eat it as the Asians do: a bit less of the spice packet, add chopped scallions, any meat (fake crab chunks), anything you find on youtube ramen videos, and immediately when you put it in a bowl top with a raw egg (hot broth cooks the egg).

I do this but I put the egg, usually two and break the yolk,  in the broth as it is cooking.  You can add cabbage or hot dogs or spam or anything.  In the states, I prefer Sapporo Ichiban, less salty but it is $.60-.80 a packet compared to Top Ramen at $.15-30 a packet.

MissNomer

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Re: Eating on the cheap
« Reply #21 on: August 04, 2014, 07:12:48 PM »
Thanks everybody for the wonderful suggestions - especially budgetbytes! I'm feeling a lot more confident on my ability to feed myself. Margo, I do have a freezer, so I'm planning on freezing a lot of soups and whatnot so that when I'm too lazy to cook I have something on hand instead of going to McDonald's.  ;D

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Winterlight

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Re: Eating on the cheap
« Reply #22 on: August 05, 2014, 10:20:33 AM »
I eat a lot of Greek yogurt in summer- my current lunch is a cup of yogurt (which I got at Target at their 10 for $10 sale), a stick of string cheese bought on discount, an english muffin, two pieces of chocolate, carrots and some kind of fruit.

I also do fruit smoothies- applesauce, bananas and some kind of inexpensive fruit, sometimes adding half a cup of chopped spinach. I have that with half a bagel topped with melted cheese. 
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Firecat

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Re: Eating on the cheap
« Reply #23 on: August 08, 2014, 01:25:56 PM »
Homemade macaroni and cheese; especially if you can buy a block of cheese and grate it yourself. I use the recipe from "How to Cook Everything." The only change I make is that instead of strictly measuring the cheese, I just add cheese to taste. It makes a 9x13 pan, and freezes reasonably well, and you can really use just about any combination of cheeses that appeals to you.

magicdomino

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Re: Eating on the cheap
« Reply #24 on: August 08, 2014, 03:47:50 PM »
anything with beans and rice/pasta (plus small amounts of meat if you need it).

I use a lot of chicken because it's relatively cheap here - i buy whatever parts are on sale (except the legs, not my favorite part). I often make whole roast chickens, cool, and then take all the chicken off the bones, chop and freeze in ziplock bags (that way i always have chicken to add to stir fry, salad, etc. for *me* (and YMMV), if i have a piece or cup of chicken, that keep me going longer and better than a salad or vegetarian meal. sometimes i'll buy an cheap inexpensive cut of beef and throw it in the slow cooker and then shred. (as it starts to freeze, shake the bag a few times so the pieces don't clump together).

Oatmeal, eggs, tuna

depending on what's available in your area - check out what is cheaper between fresh or canned/frozen. Where i live, fresh in-season produce is much cheaper than frozen/canned. Also -make "from scratch" foods (like cake, cookies, tomato sauce etc) may be cheaper than buying convenince.

Simmer the chicken bones in just enough water to cover, plus an onion and maybe some celery, for about an hour.    Strain out the bones and vegetables.  Add some of the leftover chicken meat, vegetables of some sort, some herbs (I like parsley and thyme), and some noodles or rice.  Simmer for 5 or 10 minutes depending on if your additions need a bit of cooking.  You now have chicken soup.

SoCalVal

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Re: Eating on the cheap
« Reply #25 on: Yesterday at 10:44:06 PM »
Are you located in the US?  Am wondering because I frequently shop at the Asian markets and at Sprouts (a CA grocery chain that, I believe, is also know as Boney's in other areas of the state).  Anyway, I find both the Asian markets and Sprouts (and, possibly, Winco, as well) tend to have fresh produce at an excellent price (for example, in the past few weeks, 99 Ranch, an Asian market, has had pluots for 99-cents a pound when everywhere else has had them at $2+ a pound).  I once loaded up my cart at Sprouts with nothing but produce and didn't spend more than $30 (I think I had a few different heads of lettuce, carrots, celery, cucumbers, different bell peppers, jicama, bananas, apples, oranges, blah blah blah).  I was amazed at how much I got for the amount I paid.  Anyway, you might want to check into those markets if you have them in your area.