Author Topic: Kitchen Tips  (Read 4773 times)

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Trisha

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Kitchen Tips
« on: October 02, 2007, 06:24:57 PM »
I can't believe no one has posted a thread like this before, but I searched and didn't find it, so if I missed it let me know.

I thought it would be neat to share all those kitchen tips you have.

I use a medicine syringe to make my pie dough. I'll fill a small glass with ice water and suck up what I need and squirt it into the dough. I've also heard sippy cups work well too.

I use puffy paint to label my jars and canisters because my labels always fall off. The paint it easier to see, and I can peel it off easily if I need to use the container for something else.

I use index card boxes to keep my packets of koolaid and seasonings organized.

I always cut tomatoes last when making a salad. The tomato juices take away any other smells left by the other veggies like onions.


sparksals

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Re: Kitchen Tips
« Reply #1 on: October 02, 2007, 07:54:43 PM »
I use plastic baskets from the dollar store to store tupperware lids to avoid the dreaded disorganization of having lids tossed into the cupboard.   I stack the containers together according to size and store the lids separately.  I have absolutely no problem with containers/lids falling out of the cupboard.

I store small packages of food like cook aid, powder soup mixes and seasonings in a plastic basket.  I like the index card idea too.

When I need seasoning/spice refills, I buy the refills in the plastic packages.  They are MUCH cheaper than buying the jars.   I pour the seasonings from the packet into the jar.  If I don't have a jar, keep all packaged seasonings together tightly sealed in a ziploc bag ensuring all air is squeezed out.

All small knives like paring are stored in a drawer with like size knives in a dollar store basket.  This prevents them from moving about the drawer and cutting yourself.  It also provides for easy access. I store peelers, grapefruit sectioner and other small sharp objects in the same basket.

I use a plastic dollar store basket to store scrubbies, rags, etc. for the sink that I store in the cupboard under the sink.

For cleaning the kitchen and anythign but wood, I mix 1/2 cup sudsy ammonia, 16 oz rubbing alcohol, couple squirts of Dawn and water in a large spray bottle.  It cuts grease, disinfects and leaves no streaks.  I also use it on my tile straight and mop with a clean, wet mop.  Floors shine, no streaks, no residue. 



Wordgeek

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Re: Kitchen Tips
« Reply #2 on: October 04, 2007, 12:22:45 AM »
When making a pie with a liquidy filling (like pumpkin or custard): If you fill it first and carry it over to the oven, you end up with spills everywhere.  Instead, put the empty shell on the oven rack and then pour in the filling. 



Trisha

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Re: Kitchen Tips
« Reply #3 on: October 04, 2007, 12:36:52 AM »
throw the occasional lemon down your running garbage disposal, it makes it smell nice.

Ice down the disposal will sharpen the blades, and the occasional grease or oil sent down while running and running HOT water down will lube the blades. Make sure you let the water and the disposal run a bit after pouring it down.

mechtilde

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Re: Kitchen Tips
« Reply #4 on: October 04, 2007, 05:36:08 AM »
Another use for sippy cups or a baby's bottle is for measuring smaller amounts of liquid, as most of them will have the measurements printed up the side.
NE England

cicero

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Re: Kitchen Tips
« Reply #5 on: October 04, 2007, 05:41:40 AM »
I am 90% vegetarian, so i keep a collection of soaked beans in the freezer. i buy different types of beans at once (one kilo of each), check thru them for bugs and other annoying things, then soak over night. next day, i rinse them well and pour them into a flat glass baking pan, cover with a damp paper towel and let them sit till they begin to sprout, rinsing several times a day. once they sprout i put cup-full amounts into little baggies and freeze. then === whenever you have the urge to make a soup, or bean dip >:D >:D >:D you have the pre-soaked beans all ready.


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Vegemite Girl

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Re: Kitchen Tips
« Reply #6 on: October 04, 2007, 01:14:15 PM »
*Always* have flour, butter, milk and water on hand. It's amazing how many things you can make yourself.

Also; you can whip up a pie really easily using a basic scone recipe and some leftovers. Quick and easy dinner!

MameDennis

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Re: Kitchen Tips
« Reply #7 on: October 05, 2007, 11:13:48 AM »
My favorite trick is rescuing horrible winter tomatoes.  Sometimes, we just have to have a BLT!

Slice the evil winter 'mater as thinly as you can.  Sprinkle with sugar, salt, and a bit of cider vinegar (I probably use about a teaspoon each of salt and sugar, and just a sprinkling of vinegar per tomato.)  Let the slices sit for 15-20 minutes, then drain off the liquid.  The sugar will have broken down the cells a bit, so the slices will be more tender.  The sweetness and acidity play up such tomato flavor as there is in a hothouse tomato.

You won't end up consuming most of the sugar and salt--it will end up in the liquid the tomatoes throw off. 

This obviously doesn't replace a good summer tomato, but it's awfully handy in the dead of winter!

kisu

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Re: Kitchen Tips
« Reply #8 on: October 05, 2007, 02:39:12 PM »
I don't buy small Tupperware style containers. I use the little plastic boxes margarine comes in. They're rather sturdy, they stack upon each other, they hold a lunchful (is that a word? :) ) of food, and they're totally disposable should the contents go gross. Also, the lids are usually a light colour, so permanent marker shows well - no hassle with masking tape or something. And I guess it's environmental as well - getting two uses out of an object instead of one.

edenparadox

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Re: Kitchen Tips
« Reply #9 on: October 05, 2007, 02:51:29 PM »
My favorite trick is rescuing horrible winter tomatoes.  Sometimes, we just have to have a BLT!

Slice the evil winter 'mater as thinly as you can.  Sprinkle with sugar, salt, and a bit of cider vinegar (I probably use about a teaspoon each of salt and sugar, and just a sprinkling of vinegar per tomato.)  Let the slices sit for 15-20 minutes, then drain off the liquid.  The sugar will have broken down the cells a bit, so the slices will be more tender.  The sweetness and acidity play up such tomato flavor as there is in a hothouse tomato.

You won't end up consuming most of the sugar and salt--it will end up in the liquid the tomatoes throw off. 

This obviously doesn't replace a good summer tomato, but it's awfully handy in the dead of winter!

You're my hero. I always get tomato pangs in December and there is nothing edible in the supermarket.

jais

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Re: Kitchen Tips
« Reply #10 on: October 05, 2007, 11:28:45 PM »
My favorite trick is rescuing horrible winter tomatoes.  Sometimes, we just have to have a BLT!

Slice the evil winter 'mater as thinly as you can.  Sprinkle with sugar, salt, and a bit of cider vinegar (I probably use about a teaspoon each of salt and sugar, and just a sprinkling of vinegar per tomato.)  Let the slices sit for 15-20 minutes, then drain off the liquid.  The sugar will have broken down the cells a bit, so the slices will be more tender.  The sweetness and acidity play up such tomato flavor as there is in a hothouse tomato.

You won't end up consuming most of the sugar and salt--it will end up in the liquid the tomatoes throw off. 

This obviously doesn't replace a good summer tomato, but it's awfully handy in the dead of winter!

You're my hero. I always get tomato pangs in December and there is nothing edible in the supermarket.

YUM! Tomatoes.  Thank you both!

Shoo

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Re: Kitchen Tips
« Reply #11 on: October 05, 2007, 11:33:18 PM »
Whenever I take the time to make pancakes, while the griddle is hot, I make extra so I can freeze them in individual portions.  Perfect for those mornings when your kid wants pancakes, but you don't feel like making them.  One minute in the microwave and voila!

cicero

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Re: Kitchen Tips
« Reply #12 on: October 06, 2007, 05:20:43 AM »
Whenever I take the time to make pancakes, while the griddle is hot, I make extra so I can freeze them in individual portions.  Perfect for those mornings when your kid wants pancakes, but you don't feel like making them.  One minute in the microwave and voila!

actually i do this with alot of stuff: pancakes, soup, stock, cookies, tomato sauce.... i make doubles/triples and freeze.

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Zilla

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Re: Kitchen Tips
« Reply #13 on: October 06, 2007, 02:48:25 PM »
After chopping garlic, rub your fingers under running water on any stainless steel surface.  I use my chef's knife, just act like you are cleaning the blade.  Will take garlic/onion smell right off fingers.

Don't like chopping garlic?  Use a mortar and pestle.  Cheap and very easy to use.  You can throw unpeeled garlic cloves in there and mortar away.  Then you just pick out the skin and you are left with perfect garlic mash ready for a recipe.

Add garlic in the last 5 minutes of cooking instead of beginning as many recipes call for.  It will get mellow but keep its flavor.  When you cook with garlic too long, it gets tasteless.

jais

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Re: Kitchen Tips
« Reply #14 on: October 06, 2007, 02:53:55 PM »
We've used a cooking syringe to inject roasts with the marinade while cooking.  YUM!