Author Topic: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"  (Read 5519 times)

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Where's the Quiet?

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Re: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"
« Reply #75 on: April 15, 2014, 08:55:33 AM »
We adopted a shepherd/lab mix last month from a rescue adoptathon event at a pet supply store. We had a few requirements...must be good with kids and cats and not bark a whole lot. Before even talking to anybody, my 11 year old DS zeroed in on QuietDog and was pretty sure she was the one. She is very high energy and is a perfect fit for our family. The rescue that had her told us that her previous owner only had her about a month (after being with another family for a year) and she was just too much for them. The rescue coordinator made sure we could handle running around with her (with four energetic boys, not a problem) and that we wouldn't chain her up all day, then let us take her home that day. Our kids take her to the backyard several times a day and she comes in exhausted and I would swear she is smiling as she pants. She seems to be very happy here. If the rescue had stricter/more laborious requirements we may have passed up the perfect dog. It's hard to imagine life without her. As it is, if we decide to adopt more pets in the future, we will be going straight back to this rescue.

In response to the OP, it's crazy to me that an organization that deals with dogs every day wouldn't realize that they all have different needs and personalities. There's no one size fits all solution. How sad for the dogs who would thrive with an owner in an apartment.

Cheapie

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Re: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"
« Reply #76 on: April 19, 2014, 09:22:10 PM »
We had two cats and a dog that had more frequent flyer miles than most people.  We moved them to Hong Kong with us and brought them back to the US during SARS.  We returned to Hong Kong after five months with the two cats as the dog had died ... she was quite old and had strokes that she couldn't recover from.  I'm glad it happened in the US as she is now buried with other pets in my parent's backyard.

One of the cats died over there and we had her cremated so as to bring her home when the time came.  She is buried with her best buddy, the one cat that came home with us.  This all took place while I was pregnant and after I became a first time mother all while living on the 21st floor of a high rise.  We had a strict schedule for walking the dog and even the newborn was able to adapt to it.  I couldn't imagine leaving our family members at home when hubby got transferred.

When I got pregnant with our DS2, I insisted we get DS1 a dog so the dog would be part of the family by the time the baby was born.  We got a three year old Jack Russell/Rat Terrier mix named Kitty from a rescue at a pet adoption event and he has been the best dog ever.  The worst I can say is he has peed in the house twice ... when the humans haven't paid attention to his signals ... bad humans!  We added a kitten last December.  She bugs the heck out of the dog, but he is 11 now and has no patience for kitten energy. :D

I wonder if rescues ever adopt out to farm families.  A lot of pets have totally different lifestyles on farms ... not bad, just different.

shhh its me

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Re: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"
« Reply #77 on: April 19, 2014, 10:45:37 PM »
We had two cats and a dog that had more frequent flyer miles than most people.  We moved them to Hong Kong with us and brought them back to the US during SARS.  We returned to Hong Kong after five months with the two cats as the dog had died ... she was quite old and had strokes that she couldn't recover from.  I'm glad it happened in the US as she is now buried with other pets in my parent's backyard.

One of the cats died over there and we had her cremated so as to bring her home when the time came.  She is buried with her best buddy, the one cat that came home with us.  This all took place while I was pregnant and after I became a first time mother all while living on the 21st floor of a high rise.  We had a strict schedule for walking the dog and even the newborn was able to adapt to it.  I couldn't imagine leaving our family members at home when hubby got transferred.

When I got pregnant with our DS2, I insisted we get DS1 a dog so the dog would be part of the family by the time the baby was born.  We got a three year old Jack Russell/Rat Terrier mix named Kitty from a rescue at a pet adoption event and he has been the best dog ever.  The worst I can say is he has peed in the house twice ... when the humans haven't paid attention to his signals ... bad humans!  We added a kitten last December.  She bugs the heck out of the dog, but he is 11 now and has no patience for kitten energy. :D

I wonder if rescues ever adopt out to farm families.  A lot of pets have totally different lifestyles on farms ... not bad, just different.

This reminds me one of my late cats was born in a horse barn so farm like circumstances.  he lived the first 6 months of his life as an outside cat , I had a condo and was a little worried he would not adjust to being an inside cat.  He bite and scratched me pretty badly once , I was holding him and tried to walk outside to get the mail.  He NEVER wanted to go outside. I'm not saying farm cats have a bad life but this cat 100% preferred being a house cat.

kherbert05

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Re: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"
« Reply #78 on: April 20, 2014, 08:58:10 AM »
We had a miniature toy poodle. Dad had always heard how people don't train small dogs because they can just be picked up, and that makes them more dangerous as far as biting.


Muffin was well trained. She was also very protective. At the time we had 3 young cousins toddler - Kinder. If they were fussing Muffin would not allow anyone but us near them. One time the youngest needed his diaper changed and was crying in his stroller. Muffin would not allow either parent to pick him up. The middle imp frequently got into trouble - raise your voice and Muffin was between you and imp.


Muffin would also cuddle with our rabbit, who was bigger than Muffin.
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Sunbeem

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Re: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"
« Reply #79 on: April 21, 2014, 11:46:12 AM »
I like the idea of adopting a dog from a rescue organization, but unfortunately in our area they apparently require you to sign an agreement that you will NEVER breed ANY kind of animal for profit.  Well, that rules out most farmers (of which there are many in the midwest).  While I do not personally breed animals for profit currently, I am not willing to rule out all such activities for the rest of my life.  In my immediate and extended family alone, for example, we have had 1) a thoroughbred horse farm, 2) chicken hatchery, 3) hobby dog irresponsible parents of the human variety (not as a primary source of income, but might have resulted in a small profit), 4) organic beef cattle farmer, 5) aquarium fish irresponsible parent of the human variety.  While I'd love to "rescue" a dog in need of a home, I can't justify closing off so many potential careers/hobbies to myself and my family.  There must be a whole slew of interesting assumptions behind that overly broad adoption requirement.

Hillia

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Re: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"
« Reply #80 on: April 21, 2014, 11:50:57 AM »
I like the idea of adopting a dog from a rescue organization, but unfortunately in our area they apparently require you to sign an agreement that you will NEVER breed ANY kind of animal for profit.  Well, that rules out most farmers (of which there are many in the midwest).  While I do not personally breed animals for profit currently, I am not willing to rule out all such activities for the rest of my life.  In my immediate and extended family alone, for example, we have had 1) a thoroughbred horse farm, 2) chicken hatchery, 3) hobby dog irresponsible parents of the human variety (not as a primary source of income, but might have resulted in a small profit), 4) organic beef cattle farmer, 5) aquarium fish irresponsible parent of the human variety.  While I'd love to "rescue" a dog in need of a home, I can't justify closing off so many potential careers/hobbies to myself and my family.  There must be a whole slew of interesting assumptions behind that overly broad adoption requirement.

The 'interesting assumption' is that there are way, way too many unwanted animals - hence the presence of rescue organizations.  We do not want to contribute to the overpopulation problem by providing breeding animals.  We do not want the abused dog that we spent untold amounts of time, money, and heartbreak rehabilitating to be turned into a puppy/profit mill for an unscrupulous person.  Our dogs are not income sources or careers - if you want to breed dogs, purchase a quality dog from a legitimate irresponsible parent of the human variety.  Rescue dogs are terrible breeding prospects anyway - there is zero information available on the dog's ancestry, potential inherited health conditions, etc.

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shhh its me

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Re: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"
« Reply #81 on: April 21, 2014, 11:55:48 AM »
I like the idea of adopting a dog from a rescue organization, but unfortunately in our area they apparently require you to sign an agreement that you will NEVER breed ANY kind of animal for profit.  Well, that rules out most farmers (of which there are many in the midwest).  While I do not personally breed animals for profit currently, I am not willing to rule out all such activities for the rest of my life.  In my immediate and extended family alone, for example, we have had 1) a thoroughbred horse farm, 2) chicken hatchery, 3) hobby dog irresponsible parents of the human variety (not as a primary source of income, but might have resulted in a small profit), 4) organic beef cattle farmer, 5) aquarium fish irresponsible parent of the human variety.  While I'd love to "rescue" a dog in need of a home, I can't justify closing off so many potential careers/hobbies to myself and my family.  There must be a whole slew of interesting assumptions behind that overly broad adoption requirement.

The 'interesting assumption' is that there are way, way too many unwanted animals - hence the presence of rescue organizations.  We do not want to contribute to the overpopulation problem by providing breeding animals.  We do not want the abused dog that we spent untold amounts of time, money, and heartbreak rehabilitating to be turned into a puppy/profit mill for an unscrupulous person.  Our dogs are not income sources or careers - if you want to breed dogs, purchase a quality dog from a legitimate irresponsible parent of the human variety.  Rescue dogs are terrible breeding prospects anyway - there is zero information available on the dog's ancestry, potential inherited health conditions, etc.

Agreeing to never breed THIS dog may be reasonable but  thats totally different then no animal ever.

Hillia

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Re: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"
« Reply #82 on: April 21, 2014, 11:59:44 AM »
I like the idea of adopting a dog from a rescue organization, but unfortunately in our area they apparently require you to sign an agreement that you will NEVER breed ANY kind of animal for profit.  Well, that rules out most farmers (of which there are many in the midwest).  While I do not personally breed animals for profit currently, I am not willing to rule out all such activities for the rest of my life.  In my immediate and extended family alone, for example, we have had 1) a thoroughbred horse farm, 2) chicken hatchery, 3) hobby dog irresponsible parents of the human variety (not as a primary source of income, but might have resulted in a small profit), 4) organic beef cattle farmer, 5) aquarium fish irresponsible parent of the human variety.  While I'd love to "rescue" a dog in need of a home, I can't justify closing off so many potential careers/hobbies to myself and my family.  There must be a whole slew of interesting assumptions behind that overly broad adoption requirement.

The 'interesting assumption' is that there are way, way too many unwanted animals - hence the presence of rescue organizations.  We do not want to contribute to the overpopulation problem by providing breeding animals.  We do not want the abused dog that we spent untold amounts of time, money, and heartbreak rehabilitating to be turned into a puppy/profit mill for an unscrupulous person.  Our dogs are not income sources or careers - if you want to breed dogs, purchase a quality dog from a legitimate irresponsible parent of the human variety.  Rescue dogs are terrible breeding prospects anyway - there is zero information available on the dog's ancestry, potential inherited health conditions, etc.

Agreeing to never breed THIS dog may be reasonable but  thats totally different then no animal ever.

I can't speak for farm animals (chickens, cattle, etc) but I can definitely say that no dog rescue I have ever heard of would adopt an animal that would be used for breeding.  Millions of dogs are euthanized every year.  We are not going to contribute to that statistic - period.  That's why rescue dogs are almost never released to a new home before being spayed/neutered.  Again, if you want to breed German Shepherds because you think they are an amazing breed of dog that should be preserved, get a good quality Shepherd and do it properly.  Otherwise you're producing more mixed breed dogs that may or may not have a future, no matter how many 'good homes' you find for them.

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ladyknight1

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Re: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"
« Reply #83 on: April 21, 2014, 12:00:56 PM »
Any rescue I have ever adopted has been spayed or neutered so breeding that animal is a moot point.

I have never seen that on the adoption contract and I have future plans to have a hobby farm and raise heritage chicken breeds, so I wouldn't be able to agree to that.

shhh its me

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Re: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"
« Reply #84 on: April 21, 2014, 12:04:45 PM »
I like the idea of adopting a dog from a rescue organization, but unfortunately in our area they apparently require you to sign an agreement that you will NEVER breed ANY kind of animal for profit. Well, that rules out most farmers (of which there are many in the midwest).  While I do not personally breed animals for profit currently, I am not willing to rule out all such activities for the rest of my life.  In my immediate and extended family alone, for example, we have had 1) a thoroughbred horse farm, 2) chicken hatchery, 3) hobby dog irresponsible parents of the human variety (not as a primary source of income, but might have resulted in a small profit), 4) organic beef cattle farmer, 5) aquarium fish irresponsible parent of the human variety.  While I'd love to "rescue" a dog in need of a home, I can't justify closing off so many potential careers/hobbies to myself and my family.  There must be a whole slew of interesting assumptions behind that overly broad adoption requirement.

The 'interesting assumption' is that there are way, way too many unwanted animals - hence the presence of rescue organizations.  We do not want to contribute to the overpopulation problem by providing breeding animals.  We do not want the abused dog that we spent untold amounts of time, money, and heartbreak rehabilitating to be turned into a puppy/profit mill for an unscrupulous person.  Our dogs are not income sources or careers - if you want to breed dogs, purchase a quality dog from a legitimate irresponsible parent of the human variety.  Rescue dogs are terrible breeding prospects anyway - there is zero information available on the dog's ancestry, potential inherited health conditions, etc.

Agreeing to never breed THIS dog may be reasonable but  thats totally different then no animal ever.

I can't speak for farm animals (chickens, cattle, etc) but I can definitely say that no dog rescue I have ever heard of would adopt an animal that would be used for breeding.  Millions of dogs are euthanized every year.  We are not going to contribute to that statistic - period.  That's why rescue dogs are almost never released to a new home before being spayed/neutered.  Again, if you want to breed German Shepherds because you think they are an amazing breed of dog that should be preserved, get a good quality Shepherd and do it properly.  Otherwise you're producing more mixed breed dogs that may or may not have a future, no matter how many 'good homes' you find for them.

I think the OP point was the agreement banded her from breeding any and all animals not  exclusively the pet she/he was considering adopting not even exclusively the species the was up for adoption.

Sunbeem

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Re: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"
« Reply #85 on: April 21, 2014, 12:32:38 PM »
Right, the requirement was NO breeding of ANY animals henceforth.  I totally agree it is reasonable for them to adopt out a dog with the condition that THAT DOG not be used for breeding.  But what they were requiring would prohibit the dog-adopter from every breeding ANY type of animal for the rest of their life.  However, I say WERE requiring, because this was a few years ago, last time my DH looked into dog rescue.  It's possible they have come to their senses and loosened the restrictions since then.

Library Dragon

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Re: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"
« Reply #86 on: Yesterday at 02:09:05 AM »
I hope it's changed. My immediate thought was, 'No beekeeping?'

Bees are vital in the pollination of a wide variety of crops, but that type of agreement would rule it out.

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magicdomino

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Re: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"
« Reply #87 on: Yesterday at 10:32:48 AM »
I hope it's changed. My immediate thought was, 'No beekeeping?'

Bees are vital in the pollination of a wide variety of crops, but that type of agreement would rule it out.

Dang, just thought of the worm bins in my basement.  Technically, I'd be in violation of the No Breeding Evah rule, even though I keep the worms for compost rather than fishing bait. 

Jones

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Re: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"
« Reply #88 on: Yesterday at 10:45:53 AM »
We used to have a tank full of guppies, just try stopping those things from fornicating. Then we had snails...same story...

Also, we spend a lot of time at Grandma-in-law's farm, not ours but we do have a lot to do with breeding and raising; does that count?