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Author Topic: "Don't worry about it."  (Read 4656 times)

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Team HoundMom

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"Don't worry about it."
« on: March 24, 2015, 02:39:58 PM »
So apparently my 4-year-old nephew and his mom were out shopping when he saw some Frozen themed underpants and totally wanted them.  His mom said okay, but those are marketed toward girls, so what if you were playing at school or whatever and your pants accidentally hiked down and the other kids made fun of you for wearing Elsa underwear? 

He replied: "I'd say 'Don't worry about it.  I picked them out.  I wanted them.  Don't worry about it.'"

Don't worry about it.

All I know is that I wish I had his attitude when I was a kid and the other kids were all up in my business.  I just got a lesson on how to deal with people crossing social boundaries from a 4-year-old little boy.

Betelnut

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Re: "Don't worry about it."
« Reply #1 on: March 24, 2015, 03:00:57 PM »
So apparently my 4-year-old nephew and his mom were out shopping when he saw some Frozen themed underpants and totally wanted them.  His mom said okay, but those are marketed toward girls, so what if you were playing at school or whatever and your pants accidentally hiked down and the other kids made fun of you for wearing Elsa underwear? 

He replied: "I'd say 'Don't worry about it.  I picked them out.  I wanted them.  Don't worry about it.'"

Don't worry about it.

All I know is that I wish I had his attitude when I was a kid and the other kids were all up in my business.  I just got a lesson on how to deal with people crossing social boundaries from a 4-year-old little boy.

I love his confidence. 

My only question is: Isn't underwear for girls and boys designed differently?  I've only got a daughter so I'm not sure about that...
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Team HoundMom

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Re: "Don't worry about it."
« Reply #2 on: March 24, 2015, 03:42:08 PM »
I love his confidence. 

My only question is: Isn't underwear for girls and boys designed differently?  I've only got a daughter so I'm not sure about that...

I thought so too, but apparently this kind would work for both a boy or a girl.  I wasn't there, she posted the story as her Facebook status.  She bought him some boy-themed ones as well. 

MorgnsGrl

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Re: "Don't worry about it."
« Reply #3 on: March 24, 2015, 03:50:00 PM »

My only question is: Isn't underwear for girls and boys designed differently?  I've only got a daughter so I'm not sure about that...

In my experience, the small accessibility flap on little boy's underwear is used only for entertainment (and not functional) purposes, ha ha.

Diane AKA Traska

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Re: "Don't worry about it."
« Reply #4 on: March 24, 2015, 03:57:00 PM »
So apparently my 4-year-old nephew and his mom were out shopping when he saw some Frozen themed underpants and totally wanted them.  His mom said okay, but those are marketed toward girls, so what if you were playing at school or whatever and your pants accidentally hiked down and the other kids made fun of you for wearing Elsa underwear? 

He replied: "I'd say 'Don't worry about it.  I picked them out.  I wanted them.  Don't worry about it.'"

Don't worry about it.

All I know is that I wish I had his attitude when I was a kid and the other kids were all up in my business.  I just got a lesson on how to deal with people crossing social boundaries from a 4-year-old little boy.

I normally hate this phrase, but that kid lives life like a boss!
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Kiwipinball

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Re: "Don't worry about it."
« Reply #5 on: March 24, 2015, 05:45:53 PM »
Perhaps he would like to give my nephew (same age) a lesson? He threw a massive fit when I tried to take him into the women's restroom (he had to go) because people would "laugh at him." That was fun. :) That's so great your nephew is so confident!

Betelnut

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Re: "Don't worry about it."
« Reply #6 on: March 24, 2015, 06:07:30 PM »

My only question is: Isn't underwear for girls and boys designed differently?  I've only got a daughter so I'm not sure about that...

In my experience, the small accessibility flap on little boy's underwear is used only for entertainment (and not functional) purposes, ha ha.

No, I meant more fabric in front...
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EllenS

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Re: "Don't worry about it."
« Reply #7 on: March 24, 2015, 06:22:39 PM »

My only question is: Isn't underwear for girls and boys designed differently?  I've only got a daughter so I'm not sure about that...

In my experience, the small accessibility flap on little boy's underwear is used only for entertainment (and not functional) purposes, ha ha.

No, I meant more fabric in front...

I think as long as they size it generously, not a problem. From my experience with nephews/preschool helping, little boy proportions don't make as much difference at that age. (did I put that delicately enough?)

MommyPenguin

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Re: "Don't worry about it."
« Reply #8 on: March 24, 2015, 06:23:51 PM »

My only question is: Isn't underwear for girls and boys designed differently?  I've only got a daughter so I'm not sure about that...

In my experience, the small accessibility flap on little boy's underwear is used only for entertainment (and not functional) purposes, ha ha.

No, I meant more fabric in front...

In my experience, little girls and boys can generally wear underwear meant for the other sex without a problem.  If nothing else the little boy can go a size up, but he may not even need that.
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PurpleFrog

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Re: "Don't worry about it."
« Reply #9 on: March 24, 2015, 07:44:57 PM »
Your nephew is my hero.
I love you, but if Zombies are chasing us I'm tripping you up.

BeagleMommy

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Re: "Don't worry about it."
« Reply #10 on: March 25, 2015, 01:00:40 PM »
I love that he's so confident.  His parents done good!

Lillie82

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Re: "Don't worry about it."
« Reply #11 on: July 08, 2015, 08:15:29 PM »
I love that he's so confident.  His parents done good!

Or else, he paid close attention to Frozen!

In all honesty, I haven't seen it, but I know that many people see everyone's reaction to Elsa's powers (including her own) as a metaphor for being gay, and "Let It Go" as a coming-out anthem.

And I am NOT saying that a little boy who wears underwear with a Disney theme is going to turn out to be g@y or tr@ns, but the issue in this example is still is liking something society usually associates with a different gender (i.e. Frozen-themed underwear is usually thought of as for girls.) And perhaps, there are other ways of being different that Elsa's powers can be a metaphor for. I do have to wonder, though, if the analogy would work well for, say, someone physically disabled who couldn't participate in sports or activities with their friends/classmates. Isn't that kind of the opposite of having "special" powers...you can't do something basic other people take for granted.

EllenS

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Re: "Don't worry about it."
« Reply #12 on: July 08, 2015, 11:18:15 PM »
I love that he's so confident.  His parents done good!

Or else, he paid close attention to Frozen!

In all honesty, I haven't seen it, but I know that many people see everyone's reaction to Elsa's powers (including her own) as a metaphor for being gay, and "Let It Go" as a coming-out anthem.

And I am NOT saying that a little boy who wears underwear with a Disney theme is going to turn out to be g@y or tr@ns, but the issue in this example is still is liking something society usually associates with a different gender (i.e. Frozen-themed underwear is usually thought of as for girls.) And perhaps, there are other ways of being different that Elsa's powers can be a metaphor for. I do have to wonder, though, if the analogy would work well for, say, someone physically disabled who couldn't participate in sports or activities with their friends/classmates. Isn't that kind of the opposite of having "special" powers...you can't do something basic other people take for granted.

I heard that interpretation. I thought it was really, really farfetched and problematic on so many levels. Feeling liberated from parental expectations to be perfect and never show emotions or be "wrong", is far more universal than gender/orientation issues. Coming of age and leaving home to find yourself happen to everyone.

And the nephew is even more awesome to have a handle on the "other people's opinions" thing so young. 

nuit93

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Re: "Don't worry about it."
« Reply #13 on: July 09, 2015, 10:48:26 AM »
Love that kids confidence!

Lillie82

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Re: "Don't worry about it."
« Reply #14 on: July 09, 2015, 01:53:33 PM »
I love that he's so confident.  His parents done good!

Or else, he paid close attention to Frozen!

In all honesty, I haven't seen it, but I know that many people see everyone's reaction to Elsa's powers (including her own) as a metaphor for being gay, and "Let It Go" as a coming-out anthem.

And I am NOT saying that a little boy who wears underwear with a Disney theme is going to turn out to be g@y or tr@ns, but the issue in this example is still is liking something society usually associates with a different gender (i.e. Frozen-themed underwear is usually thought of as for girls.) And perhaps, there are other ways of being different that Elsa's powers can be a metaphor for. I do have to wonder, though, if the analogy would work well for, say, someone physically disabled who couldn't participate in sports or activities with their friends/classmates. Isn't that kind of the opposite of having "special" powers...you can't do something basic other people take for granted.

I heard that interpretation. I thought it was really, really farfetched and problematic on so many levels. Feeling liberated from parental expectations to be perfect and never show emotions or be "wrong", is far more universal than gender/orientation issues. Coming of age and leaving home to find yourself happen to everyone.

And the nephew is even more awesome to have a handle on the "other people's opinions" thing so young.

I guess my point (and I certainly didn't say it very well) is that that message of not caring about other people's opinions is actually prevalent in today's kid-directed media.

In fact, I think, in some ways, it may be easier to be confident as a littler kid than as an older person...you've had more exposure to movies and books where it's cool to be different or the different person always wins than to people actually making fun of you.

@EllenS - I definitely find it problematic that so many narratives with the "embrace who you are" message equate self-hood and empowerment (and often, actual power) with embracing some variety of sexuality (whatever variety is being depicted.) And as I understand it, Elsa originally becomes mortified with her powers because she hurts her sister...so perhaps there could have been a positive message in there about NOT being entitled to do exactly what you want if it actually hurts someone.

Actually the connection between emotions and the powers made me think of people with certain kinds of mental and emotional health conditions, who may be prone to acting out emotionally in public in ways that either aren't appropriate or, in some cases, may actually hurt people. I'm not sure we should endorse "just letting it go" in all those cases!

The use of special powers is actually problematic for me because it implies that people with special talents are asked not to use them.

You hear a lot of writers and entertainment figures say they felt like their inner fire, passion, spirit, or creativity, or the story they wanted to tell, or even their talent was against the rules of society in some way. Or activists talk about society trying to suppress their opinions or their desire for change. I relate to the "pressure to be perfect" thing, but the definition of "perfect" I absorbed meant feeling pressure TO my "powers" (abilities) to achieve big things and affect the world. There are reasons NOT to do things besides the fear of rejection or being different!

ETA: I used to be very into speaking out on everything and changing the world, and now I feel more like "just let it go" as in "let the WORRY go."
« Last Edit: July 09, 2015, 02:39:32 PM by Lillie82 »