Author Topic: "Noted."  (Read 17721 times)

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behindbj

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"Noted."
« on: October 11, 2007, 04:55:03 PM »
I mentioned this one in a previous thread discussing how people respond to statements that are meant to cause you to do something.

As in:

"My child can't see."

"I can hear you knitting."

"I heard you come in last night and leave in the morning and return later in the day and then go out again."  (MarinaDCA only...)

"Your music is annoying."

Personally, I can't stand that kind of thing.  I would rather someone say "Could you please let me son stand in front of you/could you please move a couple inches to the left/etc" than "My kid can't see."  "Noted" works great.

I don't like what we're having for breakfast.

Noted. 

I think the house isn't clean enough.

Noted.

**Preceding two for the benefit of Tabris.**

I prefer to sit on the aisle (from a latecomer who wanted me to move from the seat I got there early to get).

Noted.

And so on.

Sometimes people actually get it and actually ASK A QUESTION OR MAKE A REQUEST.  Brilliant!  Now, they don't always get the answer they want, but they stand a greater chance of getting something by asking.

Can't STAND hinting.

Any sterling "noted" moments out there?

behindbj

sbtier

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Re: "Noted."
« Reply #1 on: October 11, 2007, 07:11:39 PM »
I
I prefer to sit on the aisle (from a latecomer who wanted me to move from the seat I got there early to get).
behindbj

Just curious, was this someone you knew or a stranger?  If it was a stranger, I think I'd have more than 'noted' to say.   ;D

Craxodile

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Re: "Noted."
« Reply #2 on: October 11, 2007, 07:20:40 PM »
Hmm, I have to say I think it's not in the spirit of politeness. It feels kind of snarky. If the situation is such that you  feel you shouldn't offer to give them what they want just to be the better person, I think a vague "Oh?"  would work better.

Trisha

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Re: "Noted."
« Reply #3 on: October 11, 2007, 08:53:38 PM »
I
I prefer to sit on the aisle (from a latecomer who wanted me to move from the seat I got there early to get).
behindbj

Just curious, was this someone you knew or a stranger?  If it was a stranger, I think I'd have more than 'noted' to say.   ;D

OOOO THAT is my biggest movie pet peeve! Especially when the ushers ask you to move. No, I'm sorry, I got here early specifically to sit on the isle or in the middle, I am not going to move just because you didn't. Now, I will move to accommodate someone if there are 2 in a group and if I move down a seat they'll have 2 seats together, but not if I'm on the isle. Or I'll move if its obvious the need the isle IE they're on crutches etc. However, I refuse to move just because they don't want to sit in the available spots.

Lisbeth

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Re: "Noted."
« Reply #4 on: October 11, 2007, 09:42:25 PM »
Hmm, I have to say I think it's not in the spirit of politeness. It feels kind of snarky. If the situation is such that you  feel you shouldn't offer to give them what they want just to be the better person, I think a vague "Oh?"  would work better.

I agree.  "Noted" only works in courtrooms when a judge says it to an attorney who opposes their action.

Otherwise, it's very cold and does come off as snarky.  If said to the wrong person (someone who actually deserves it but has a personality quirk that guarantees that they will not take it in the right spirit), it has the potential to make things worse.
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MineralDiva

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Re: "Noted."
« Reply #5 on: October 12, 2007, 01:21:55 PM »
My usual response to such questions is, "Your opinion is duly noted and logged.  Thank you for sharing."  And then I continue doing whatever I want to do.

caranfin

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Re: "Noted."
« Reply #6 on: October 12, 2007, 02:43:08 PM »
I think if the other person is saying something rude and unneccessary (i.e., your MIL telling you your house isn't clean enough), it's an appropriate response. If you want it to be less snarky, you might say "Thanks for letting me know." Or, in the case of people who prefer your aisle seat, your spot at the parade, etc., you can say "Yeah, me too! In fact, that's why I come early - so I can get the aisle seat."
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jibby

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Re: "Noted."
« Reply #7 on: October 12, 2007, 02:46:42 PM »
I admit to having used "noted", but only when it was obvious the person was being obnoxious, and not just making a clumsily worded request. 

I also like "How about that", but not inflected upward at the end.  It's said as a vague statement, not a question.

I've been using "What an interesting thing to say" for years.

Bob Ducca

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Re: "Noted."
« Reply #8 on: October 12, 2007, 02:52:23 PM »
I am really trying to train my students to ask questions, not make statements and stare, blankly, waiting for me to take care of all of their problems.

I have found that "What would you like me to do about that?" said in a nice tone works with them.

Example: today, a student came up to me and announced, clutching her earlobe, "My ear hurts."  I am thinking, "I bet it is, since you are digging into it with your fingernails," but I say, "What would you like me to do about that?"  She stared at me for a moment, then went and sat down.

Earlier in the day, though, a littler one came up to me with her earring in her hand.  "My earring fell out," she said.  "What do we need to do about that?" I said.  She thought, then said, "Can you help me put my earring back in?"  Voila!  A request!  It worked?

With older, ruder, more entitled students, I have been known to pull out the "And this affects me how?" if the demand/statement is used too often, but I try to not be so snarky, really...I just believe that 16 years old is old enough to say, "May I go to the nurse?" instead of, "Miss, I got my period..." in a whiny tone...

extranormal

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Re: "Noted."
« Reply #9 on: October 12, 2007, 03:19:25 PM »
Quote
I have found that "What would you like me to do about that?" said in a nice tone works with them

I use a version of this with my son when he presents me with some vague complaint.

"My calculator won't turn on."
"And what would you like me to do with that information?"

I think he's finally getting the idea that I will usually grant specific requests, whereas amorphous grousing just makes me cranky.

With strangers, though, or acquaintances? That's tougher. I agree that "noted" (or my personal snarky favorite, "Understood.") can come of as kind of snitty. If I'm aiming for snitty, as when somebody expects my aisle seat just because she likes them, great. Otherwise, I like Craxodile's suggestion of, "Oh?"

Ticia

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Re: "Noted."
« Reply #10 on: October 12, 2007, 04:31:54 PM »
I personally prefer "That's interesting." said very dryly. I should also note that the only people I actually use this with are my own children, when they say something like "I'm hungry." or "I want to watch TV." or similar statements. They then say "Can you please get me a snack?" or "Can I please watch TV."
« Last Edit: October 12, 2007, 04:36:14 PM by Ticia »
Utah

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Re: "Noted."
« Reply #11 on: October 12, 2007, 04:34:19 PM »
I am really trying to train my students to ask questions, not make statements and stare, blankly, waiting for me to take care of all of their problems.

I have found that "What would you like me to do about that?" said in a nice tone works with them.

Example: today, a student came up to me and announced, clutching her earlobe, "My ear hurts."  I am thinking, "I bet it is, since you are digging into it with your fingernails," but I say, "What would you like me to do about that?"  She stared at me for a moment, then went and sat down.

Earlier in the day, though, a littler one came up to me with her earring in her hand.  "My earring fell out," she said.  "What do we need to do about that?" I said.  She thought, then said, "Can you help me put my earring back in?"  Voila!  A request!  It worked?

With older, ruder, more entitled students, I have been known to pull out the "And this affects me how?" if the demand/statement is used too often, but I try to not be so snarky, really...I just believe that 16 years old is old enough to say, "May I go to the nurse?" instead of, "Miss, I got my period..." in a whiny tone...

I use "what do you think I should do about that?" with my own kids all the time. :)

Dragonflymom

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Re: "Noted."
« Reply #12 on: October 12, 2007, 09:18:48 PM »
I am really trying to train my students to ask questions, not make statements and stare, blankly, waiting for me to take care of all of their problems.

I have found that "What would you like me to do about that?" said in a nice tone works with them.

Example: today, a student came up to me and announced, clutching her earlobe, "My ear hurts."  I am thinking, "I bet it is, since you are digging into it with your fingernails," but I say, "What would you like me to do about that?"  She stared at me for a moment, then went and sat down.

Earlier in the day, though, a littler one came up to me with her earring in her hand.  "My earring fell out," she said.  "What do we need to do about that?" I said.  She thought, then said, "Can you help me put my earring back in?"  Voila!  A request!  It worked?

With older, ruder, more entitled students, I have been known to pull out the "And this affects me how?" if the demand/statement is used too often, but I try to not be so snarky, really...I just believe that 16 years old is old enough to say, "May I go to the nurse?" instead of, "Miss, I got my period..." in a whiny tone...

I use "what do you think I should do about that?" with my own kids all the time. :)

With my daughter its "that's nice, and?"  She gets the point really quickly and comes out and asks, or else lets me get back to whatever I was working on. :)  With a stranger being obnoxious, or family member making an inappropriate comment, they will usually just get the "that's nice."
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Lysistrata

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Re: "Noted."
« Reply #13 on: October 13, 2007, 08:47:11 AM »
Quote
I prefer to sit on the aisle (from a latecomer who wanted me to move from the seat I got there early to get).

"Me too."

Sirius

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Re: "Noted."
« Reply #14 on: October 13, 2007, 03:42:21 PM »
I
I prefer to sit on the aisle (from a latecomer who wanted me to move from the seat I got there early to get).
behindbj

Just curious, was this someone you knew or a stranger?  If it was a stranger, I think I'd have more than 'noted' to say.   ;D

OOOO THAT is my biggest movie pet peeve! Especially when the ushers ask you to move. No, I'm sorry, I got here early specifically to sit on the isle or in the middle, I am not going to move just because you didn't. Now, I will move to accommodate someone if there are 2 in a group and if I move down a seat they'll have 2 seats together, but not if I'm on the isle. Or I'll move if its obvious the need the isle IE they're on crutches etc. However, I refuse to move just because they don't want to sit in the available spots.

Me, too, Trish.  Although I'm not claustrophobic, I don't like being in the middle of crowds so I do my best to get aisle seats.  I've had people come up to me and more or less demand that I "move over".  I've also gotten "It would have been nice if we'd all been able to sit together," with pointed looks in my direction.  If I have an aisle seat (particularly if I have a ticket for one or was otherwise assigned one) I'm not moving.  If someone wants to sit with someone else, they should get there in time to do so, not depend on the kindness of strangers.  Now, I will move so someone on crutches or who is otherwise handicapped can have the aisle seat, but I still think people in that situation should get to a function early enough to get a seat that suits them.  I'm always early for functions because I want an aisle seat.

I've even had people ask just me to move so they can sit by their spouse, but I won't if it means that I can't sit by my spouse.  One woman got quite snippy; that's where I heard "It would have been nice if we'd all been able to sit together," because I wouldn't move down a seat so she and her husband could sit between me and my date (later husband).  Not going to happen.