News:

  • April 24, 2018, 10:44:34 PM

Login with username, password and session length

Author Topic: Tell this European how to make real Mac'n'Cheese  (Read 7061 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Quesselin

  • Member
  • Posts: 556
Tell this European how to make real Mac'n'Cheese
« on: January 28, 2008, 11:38:39 AM »
Yes, I know mac and cheese is not exactly gourmet cooking, but Americans always seem to go on and on about. I tried (or rather, my husband did, he's the cook around here) making a recipe I found somewhere on the net, but we really didn't care for that, and it looked nothing like the pictures I've seen of it.

So, please, will some kindly American or two or eight give me their recipe for making mac and cheese? Just so I can say I've had it  :).

veryfluffy

  • Member
  • Posts: 3121
Re: Tell this European how to make real Mac'n'Cheese
« Reply #1 on: January 28, 2008, 12:56:40 PM »
That is an interesting question! I happen to looooove the Kraft mac-and-cheese in a box, whereas anytime I've had the real, homemade stuff, it was distinctingly underwhelming.
   

edenparadox

  • Guest
Re: Tell this European how to make real Mac'n'Cheese
« Reply #2 on: January 28, 2008, 01:04:02 PM »
Well this is how I do it.

Make a roux (flour and butter cooked together to a light goo) then slowly add in milk and STIRSTIRSTIR until you have the amount you want. When the sauce bubbles, it should thicken. Add a massive amount of shredded good cheddar. Salt and pepper it. I also throw in some herbs and/or spices - parsley, maybe a little cayenne for heat. Some people advocate a touch of nutmeg, which is classic.

Cook some shells - remove from water when they are still al dente because they will further cook in the oven. Shock them with ice water and drain.

Stir the pasta and sauce together, pour into a buttered pan and top with more shredded cheese, little pats of butter and some breadcrumbs. Bake until golden and bubbly.

--

I also find this recipe underwhelming and I would suggest adding in a little pancetta and some caramelized onion or roasted garlic.

Elle

  • Guest
Re: Tell this European how to make real Mac'n'Cheese
« Reply #3 on: January 28, 2008, 01:05:29 PM »
Okay, the best mac & cheese (as in the stuff that is comfort food to me) is not made out of what you would technically consider cheese. Melting Velveeta on elbow noodles (with a smidge of butter) is the best, hands down.

Mikayla

  • Member
  • Posts: 4366
Re: Tell this European how to make real Mac'n'Cheese
« Reply #4 on: January 28, 2008, 08:14:50 PM »
The only mac and cheese I've ever liked is the cheap Kraft.  (The one with the powdered cheese that gets in your cuticles and makes you look like you're very ill or something).  It's one of my favorite comfort foods!

Elfqueen13

  • Member
  • Posts: 4068
    • Adventures in House Hunting!
Re: Tell this European how to make real Mac'n'Cheese
« Reply #5 on: January 28, 2008, 09:43:53 PM »
Can't.  You need "government cheese" available only in the US.

Otherwise, Edenparadox's sounds about right.
Follow along on my house hunt!  http://ulfrslady.livejournal.com/

skbenny

  • Guest
Re: Tell this European how to make real Mac'n'Cheese
« Reply #6 on: January 28, 2008, 09:47:58 PM »
I like to take the cheese powder from a box of mac n cheese, mix it with 2 tablespoons of butter and 1/2 cup milk.  Cook in microwave for about 3 minutes, stirring a lot.  Add cooked mac, and you have the perfect mac n cheese.

This is one of the few dishes that I use from a box and not from scratch.  I like mac n cheese from scratch, but it's not a comfort food like the boxed stuff.

MadMadge43

  • MadMadge43
  • Member
  • Posts: 5563
  • Etiquette is making others feel special
Re: Tell this European how to make real Mac'n'Cheese
« Reply #7 on: January 28, 2008, 09:56:12 PM »
I have two recipes for Mac& cheese. Both are every bit as good for me, but when I'm craving one the other just will not suffice.

1. Mom's recipe. Cooked elbow mac, dust with flour, add cubed sharp cheddar cheese, fill up 1/4 way with milk, add dry mustard, worchestshire & dried onions to taste, mix up, cook for 30 minutes at 350. Top with Progresso Italian bread crumbs and cook another 45 minutes.

2. Buy a box of Kraft and follow the directions (but, make sure you remove noodles, then add the butter, let melt, then add the milk & cheese mix, bring to a boil then put the noodles back in). Oh, you also have to make sure you salt and pepper the sauce while it's starting to cook.

GlindaBunny

  • Member
  • Posts: 3991
    • my etsy store
Re: Tell this European how to make real Mac'n'Cheese
« Reply #8 on: January 28, 2008, 10:44:09 PM »
You can make stovetop mac and cheese without buying a boxed mix.  It's quite good and doesn't taste like the baked stuff, which can sometimes be grainy.

Here's Alton Brown's recipe.  I omit the hot sauce and mustard and it still works beautifully.

1/2 pound elbow macaroni
4 tablespoons butter
2 eggs
6 ounces evaporated milk
1/2 teaspoon hot sauce
1 teaspoon kosher salt
Fresh black pepper
3/4 teaspoon dry mustard
10 ounces sharp cheddar, shredded
In a large pot of boiling, salted water cook the pasta to al dente and drain. Return to the pot and melt in the butter. Toss to coat.
Whisk together the eggs, milk, hot sauce, salt, pepper, and mustard. Stir into the pasta and add the cheese. Over low heat continue to stir for 3 minutes or until creamy.

KatPsych

  • Member
  • Posts: 550
Re: Tell this European how to make real Mac'n'Cheese
« Reply #9 on: January 28, 2008, 10:50:37 PM »
Quote
1. Mom's recipe. Cooked elbow mac, dust with flour, add cubed sharp cheddar cheese, fill up 1/4 way with milk, add dry mustard, worchestshire & dried onions to taste, mix up, cook for 30 minutes at 350. Top with Progresso Italian bread crumbs and cook another 45 minutes.

Mine is very similar to MadMadge's.

1 lb. elbow pasta (cook to al dente in salted water), then drain
about 4 blocks of sharp cheddar cheese (I think this would be about 2 lbs.) cut into 1 inch cubes.
milk
salt and pepper

Preheat oven to 375.  Take a 9 by 13 casserole dish and put a layer of cooked elbow noodles on the bottom (you will use about half the total amount).  Salt and pepper the noodles.  then layer half the cheese over this layer of noodles.  Then do a second layer of noodles (using the rest of them), salt and pepper, then the final layer of the sharp cheddar.  Then add enough milk to fill the dish about 1/5 to 1/4 of the way up.

Bake at 375 about 45 minutes or until top is bubbly and slightly brown.

Lady Vavasour

  • Member
  • Posts: 1919
Re: Tell this European how to make real Mac'n'Cheese
« Reply #10 on: January 28, 2008, 11:00:48 PM »
In the Caribbean they eat macaroni and cheese with hot sauce. I'm not normally a fan of mac and cheese, but I quite like it with the hot sauce!

blarg314

  • Member
  • Posts: 9271
Re: Tell this European how to make real Mac'n'Cheese
« Reply #11 on: January 29, 2008, 12:26:47 AM »

My usual method

You need about two cups of shredded cheese - I like a mixture of sharp cheddar, gouda and havarti, with a few tablespoons of grated parmesan or romano. Generally moderately flavourful cheese respond best - blue cheese is a bit too pungent, and mozarella too bland.

Make the roux (~ 2 T butter and 1 T flour), then add about 3/4 a cup of milk and two crushed cloves of garlic. When it's smooth and bubbling, slowly add the cheese, stirring as it melts. Season with 1/2 teaspoon dijon mustard, 1 teaspoon salt, freshly ground pepper, 1/2 teaspoon paprika and a squeeze of lemon juice.

Cook the pasta al dente  - I like shells particularly, although macaroni is traditional. mix the shells and pasta in a casserole dish, optionally top with a little more cheese, and bake until bubbly.

Personally, I find the secret is to use cheese that isn't too bland (no mozza, no mild cheddar), and to season it subtly to boost the flavour a little.


 

Quesselin

  • Member
  • Posts: 556
Re: Tell this European how to make real Mac'n'Cheese
« Reply #12 on: January 29, 2008, 07:07:06 AM »
Thank you to everybody who posted recipes and/or suggestions. I couldn't help smiling at those saying "the Kraft one is the best, just buy that", though.  :) We don't have that in Denmark, since we don't eat mac and cheese. Also, what is Velveeta? Some sort of processed cheese/cheese substitute?

But again, thanks to everybody, many of these recipes look really good. I'll send you all a thought when we make it.  :)


Rei-chan

  • Member
  • Posts: 2031
  • It's been awhile, but it's good to be back!
Re: Tell this European how to make real Mac'n'Cheese
« Reply #13 on: January 29, 2008, 08:55:58 AM »
Thank you to everybody who posted recipes and/or suggestions. I couldn't help smiling at those saying "the Kraft one is the best, just buy that", though.  :) We don't have that in Denmark, since we don't eat mac and cheese. Also, what is Velveeta? Some sort of processed cheese/cheese substitute?

But again, thanks to everybody, many of these recipes look really good. I'll send you all a thought when we make it.  :)



Velveeta is a processed "cheese food".....check it out, amazon has the shells and cheese online (the mind boggles at what you can buy off the internet):

velveeta shells and cheese

Elle

  • Guest
Re: Tell this European how to make real Mac'n'Cheese
« Reply #14 on: January 29, 2008, 09:00:43 AM »
Thank you to everybody who posted recipes and/or suggestions. I couldn't help smiling at those saying "the Kraft one is the best, just buy that", though.  :) We don't have that in Denmark, since we don't eat mac and cheese. Also, what is Velveeta? Some sort of processed cheese/cheese substitute?

But again, thanks to everybody, many of these recipes look really good. I'll send you all a thought when we make it.  :)



Velveeta really isn't a 'cheese' in any sense of the word. (Legally they have to call it a 'cheese food' or something else). It's is a sickening assemblage of processed chemicals and dyes that melts over noodles wonderfully.