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Author Topic: Tell this European how to make real Mac'n'Cheese  (Read 7068 times)

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Lady Vavasour

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Re: Tell this European how to make real Mac'n'Cheese
« Reply #30 on: February 10, 2008, 06:02:03 PM »
The folks at Cook's Illustrated came up with a version that had the creamy texture of Kraft, but tastes a whole lot better.
 Stovetop Macaroni and Cheese . There is a baked version as well.

For the OP, the main thing with the cheese in this recipe is that it should be a mild cheddar-style that melts well. Be sure to use canned evaporated milk, not fresh milk and not sweetened condensed milk. "Hot red pepper sauce" means Tabasco or something similar.


Oh, YUCK! Macaroni and Cheese with sweetened condensed milk?! Are there really people who do that?

Quesselin

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Re: Tell this European how to make real Mac'n'Cheese
« Reply #31 on: February 11, 2008, 03:36:45 AM »
Again, thanks to all of you for the recipes, hints, and suggestions.

CyberKat

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Re: Tell this European how to make real Mac'n'Cheese
« Reply #32 on: February 11, 2008, 05:39:34 AM »
A "cheese food". I find that oddly... unnerving. We have nothing of like that over here, though we're familiar with that kind of naming. In DK, it's common to eat "pålægschokolade": Very thin slices of dark chocolate, eaten on bread. If there is not enough cocoa in the pålægschokolade to earn the name of chocolate (as you can undoubtedly see, that's what the last part of the word means), they have to call it "vekaopålæg", which is basically "something vaguely like chocolate, though nobody in their right minds would be fooled, sorry 'bout that".

For some reason, I found this incredibly funny. I usually avoid the "vekao" too :P

Btw, we do have something similar in Denmark, the brand Knorr makes a "just add water" pasta with cheese sauce, called "Parmesana" from their brand "Spaghetteria". Not sure how it tastes though, I haven't tried it. It says "pasta with cheese sauce" on the package though.


Also, the easy version of Mac 'n Cheese with Danish ingredients:

250 g elbow macaroni (most smallish pasta will be fine though, this is for the American "look")
2 spoonfuls of butter
2 spoonfuls of flour
5 dl milk
pepper to taste
2 bags of grated cheese, you can use one bag of mozzarella and one with cheddar, or 2 cheddar, depending on how strong taste you want. You can also buy a block of cheddar and grate it yourself.


Boil the pasta.

Melt the butter in a pan, and whisk the flour and pepper in with it. Add the milk. (It's a good idea to heat the milk first, to avoid clumping!)
Whisk it a lot, while keeping it at a slow boil, and then slowly add the cheese. Be careful so it doesn't burn!

Drain the pasta and stir it in with the sauce. Eat it like it is, or pour it into something that goes in the oven, and bake it for 25 minutes at 180* C.
If you put it in the oven, cook the pasta a minute or two less, so they're al dente. Otherwise they can become too soft in the oven.

nutraxfornerves

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Re: Tell this European how to make real Mac'n'Cheese
« Reply #33 on: February 11, 2008, 11:24:33 PM »
Quote
Oh, YUCK! Macaroni and Cheese with sweetened condensed milk?! Are there really people who do that?
I doubt it, but there are people who get the two kinds of canned milk confused.

Nutrax
The plural of anecdote is not data

Flora Louise

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Re: Tell this European how to make real Mac'n'Cheese
« Reply #34 on: February 12, 2008, 01:25:08 PM »
nutraxfornerves, I love your name. Dorothy Sayers?

I make it from scratch with the Betty Crocker recipe and love it best with dry mustard added. In fact, now you people have me hungry for it. Wonder what I've got in the pantry?
Just because you're disappointed in me doesn't mean I did anything wrong.

nutraxfornerves

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Re: Tell this European how to make real Mac'n'Cheese
« Reply #35 on: February 12, 2008, 01:29:57 PM »
nutraxfornerves, I love your name. Dorothy Sayers?
Yes, I chose it when I was very active in a Lord Peter email list. To keep vaguely on topic--somehow I don't see Bunter producing macaroni & cheese for his lordship.

Nutrax
The plural of anecdote is not data

Mikayla

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Re: Tell this European how to make real Mac'n'Cheese
« Reply #36 on: February 24, 2008, 04:19:36 PM »
I totally grossed out some dormmates in college when I added chopped up hot dogs to my mac & cheese.  Then a few others did it, and they all loved it.  I'm a trend-setter. ;)  We all ate it that way at home, but somehow some of those weird Yankees I went to school with hadn't heard of it! 

I haven't had it in a long time (diet *g*), but that used to be my serious comfort food.  I agree with others, homemade mac & cheese just isn't the same.  You need it in all its processed goodness.  And it's probably something you have to grow up with.  It's more a nostalgia food than a taste food.

LOL!  In college all good things start with mac and cheese  or hot dogs  8) 

I did pick up one habit there that I've never broken -- adding water to scrambled eggs instead of milk.  I love the consistency when you do that.

We also ate a lot of grilled peanut butter sandwiches and horrid tuna thing that I still have nightmares about.

Back to mac 'n cheese, if someone is in a hurry and wants to just get a frozen one to nuke, I vote for Stauffers.  Not the lite or anything healthy - just the basic red box.

Edited for umm coherence
« Last Edit: February 24, 2008, 04:23:09 PM by MIKAYLA »

GlindaBunny

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Re: Tell this European how to make real Mac'n'Cheese
« Reply #37 on: February 24, 2008, 07:12:50 PM »
The folks at Cook's Illustrated came up with a version that had the creamy texture of Kraft, but tastes a whole lot better.
 Stovetop Macaroni and Cheese . There is a baked version as well.

For the OP, the main thing with the cheese in this recipe is that it should be a mild cheddar-style that melts well. Be sure to use canned evaporated milk, not fresh milk and not sweetened condensed milk. "Hot red pepper sauce" means Tabasco or something similar.


Oh, YUCK! Macaroni and Cheese with sweetened condensed milk?! Are there really people who do that?


um... I looked at the recipe.  It doesn't have sweetened condensed milk.  It calls for evaporated milk, which is just milk with half the water evaporated out.  It makes for creamier mac and cheese.

kckgirl

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Re: Tell this European how to make real Mac'n'Cheese
« Reply #38 on: February 24, 2008, 07:50:55 PM »
Also, the easy version of Mac 'n Cheese with Danish ingredients:

250 g elbow macaroni (most smallish pasta will be fine though, this is for the American "look")
2 spoonfuls of butter
2 spoonfuls of flour (these first two ingredients are the roux)
5 dl milk
pepper to taste
2 bags of grated cheese, you can use one bag of mozzarella and one with cheddar, or 2 cheddar, depending on how strong taste you want. You can also buy a block of cheddar and grate it yourself. (I prefer sharp cheddar.)


Boil the pasta.

Melt the butter in a pan, and whisk the flour and pepper in with it. Add the milk. (It's a good idea to heat the milk first, to avoid clumping!)
Whisk it a lot, while keeping it at a slow boil, and then slowly add the cheese. Be careful so it doesn't burn!

Drain the pasta and stir it in with the sauce. Eat it like it is, or pour it into something that goes in the oven, and bake it for 25 minutes at 180* C.
If you put it in the oven, cook the pasta a minute or two less, so they're al dente. Otherwise they can become too soft in the oven.

This recipe is very similar to mine, but we add a squirt of prepared mustard to the sauce for some "zip," and always bake it 30-45 minutes at 350F. Besides the creamy goodness, one of my favorite parts is the light brown crust that forms around the edge when it bakes. My mother tops it with link sausages (the breakfast kind, usually cooked and added before the end of baking; I have added cubed ham, but mostly like it plain).

I have never liked Kraft mac & cheese, although some people here and elsewhere like it best.
Maryland

Sneezy

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Re: Tell this European how to make real Mac'n'Cheese
« Reply #39 on: February 24, 2008, 08:17:10 PM »
Also, the easy version of Mac 'n Cheese with Danish ingredients:

This is very similar to how I do it myself.  It's a good way to use up all of the loose ends of cheese in the fridge before they start going bad.  I also add a tiny bit of chili powder, so small you don't know it's there.


Nuku

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Re: Tell this European how to make real Mac'n'Cheese
« Reply #40 on: March 07, 2008, 04:53:23 PM »
I've only made homemade mac & cheese once, and I didn't like it that much. However, I've loved it when other people/restaurants make it from scratch, so I think it was my recipe.

I personally prefer the Annie's brand for an easy boxed mac & cheese dinner. It's more expensive, but it's a more natural product and tastier. (I grew up with Kraft, and I tried the Velveeta version once. If you didn't eat it as a kid, you don't like it as an adult.) But I always add broccoli and/or peas to my boxed mac & cheese.