Author Topic: S/O PD Student Darwinism  (Read 236621 times)

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greencat

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #1395 on: September 16, 2014, 05:10:43 PM »
Huh! I learned something new today! I never knew the ps was silent.

And people wonder why it's so difficult to learn how to spell English ;)

That's because we got that word from French.

MommyPenguin

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #1396 on: September 16, 2014, 05:35:03 PM »
This reminds me of how, for the longest time, I was convinced that the person to see about passport applications and whatnot was called a "Noda Republic".

My dad was an *adult* working at a federal agency when he wrote a note on his office that he was "next store" and would be back later.  His coworkers got quite the laugh out of that one.  He also used to say that he knew a thing like he knew the back of his head, until a coworker said, "Uh, Dave, just how well *do* you know the back of your head?" and explained that the phrase is about your *hand*.

LazyDaisy

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #1397 on: September 16, 2014, 07:43:59 PM »
I work on a student written/edited magazine. We had one submission that had me laughing even though it was intended to be a somber essay. The second line was "New Mexico's Chaco Canyon ruins—stone behemoths that served as trade centers for the Anasazi tribe, who dominated the entire Southwest a thousand years ago—teethed with strange energy." I'm pretty sure he meant teemed but it made it through 2 editors before it reached me and no one corrected it.

I had a young man email me changes to a brochure I was working on. He wanted to move the "amber sign" to the bottom of the brochure. I couldn't really figure out what "amber sign" meant even in context (there was a small yellow box with text in it -- so that was my guess). After some back and forth communication he meant this symbol --> & the ampersand. He's currently working on his MBA. I don't understand why, if he didn't really know the correct name for it or was having trouble spelling it, he didn't just call it the "and" symbol, or better yet, Google it first.

A spin on the Peace Corps vein...I know an adult who calls the popular U.S. lumber/tool store Home "De-pot" and they're not trying to be cutesy at all. I could understand if they had only heard it and didn't know how to spell it, but how do they not hear that no one else pronounces it like that?
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Hillia

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #1398 on: September 16, 2014, 08:54:52 PM »
DH has a very know-it-all cousin, who entertained me (unintentionally) for several minutes by talking about the Third Rich in Germany.  No amount of gentle correction 'Third Reich' from me would dissuade him, and in fact he would correct me.  It got to be pretty funny (to me, anyway).

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Lady Snowdon

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #1399 on: September 16, 2014, 08:57:04 PM »
I work on a student written/edited magazine. We had one submission that had me laughing even though it was intended to be a somber essay. The second line was "New Mexico's Chaco Canyon ruins—stone behemoths that served as trade centers for the Anasazi tribe, who dominated the entire Southwest a thousand years ago—teethed with strange energy." I'm pretty sure he meant teemed but it made it through 2 editors before it reached me and no one corrected it.

I had a young man email me changes to a brochure I was working on. He wanted to move the "amber sign" to the bottom of the brochure. I couldn't really figure out what "amber sign" meant even in context (there was a small yellow box with text in it -- so that was my guess). After some back and forth communication he meant this symbol --> & the ampersand. He's currently working on his MBA. I don't understand why, if he didn't really know the correct name for it or was having trouble spelling it, he didn't just call it the "and" symbol, or better yet, Google it first.

A spin on the Peace Corps vein...I know an adult who calls the popular U.S. lumber/tool store Home "De-pot" and they're not trying to be cutesy at all. I could understand if they had only heard it and didn't know how to spell it, but how do they not hear that no one else pronounces it like that?

Or he could have meant "seethed with strange energy". 

DH and I refer to the Home Depot as "the home despot" as a joke, although we do know how to pronounce it correctly!

onikenbai

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #1400 on: September 16, 2014, 10:18:03 PM »
Another problem is that 'Peace Corps'  makes sense as a phrase.  'Piece Core' doesn't. 

No it totally makes sense.  Raise your hand if, like me, you now want to work in the middle of a giant Reese's Piece.  Mmmm....

blue2000

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #1401 on: September 16, 2014, 11:06:25 PM »
Another problem is that 'Peace Corps'  makes sense as a phrase.  'Piece Core' doesn't. 

No it totally makes sense.  Raise your hand if, like me, you now want to work in the middle of a giant Reese's Piece.  Mmmm....

That would make a great sci-fi story.

"We made it to the core of the alien ship. Oh my goodness... it's worse that we thought! It's a piece core. It's chocolate."

"Ma'am, we've detected peanut butter in the vicinity as well."

"Dear Diety! Humanity is doomed!!!"
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RooRoo

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #1402 on: September 16, 2014, 11:08:35 PM »
Perhaps he was combining "seethed" and "teemed"? It could have started as a kid thing...

I'm reminded of my mother and her lifelong friend. Best friends from grade school, all the way up to my mother's funeral... Anyway, back in their childhood days swearing was just Not Done. In some circumstances, many people would say "Perish the thought!" or "Heaven forbid!" If you say them out loud a few times, you'll see that they each have four syllables, and the emphases fall in the same place. Mom and her BFF combined them into "Perish forbid!" and thought it was hysterically funny, and then it became a habit, which was passed on to me - and I still say it!

As for student Darwinism, let me just say that studying with a bar candle to the left, and a Manhattan on the right is not conducive to good grades. Neither is being hungover in class.  I don't know anyone who did that, of course, especially not me!  :o ::)         
"Someday we must write a book of Etiquette for sensible people," said Mrs. Morland, "though apart from a few rules it really boils down to an educated mind and a kind heart." ~ Angela Thirkell, Never Too Late

MariaE

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #1403 on: Yesterday at 12:38:41 AM »
Huh! I learned something new today! I never knew the ps was silent.

And people wonder why it's so difficult to learn how to spell English ;)

That's because we got that word from French.

That would explain it :)
 
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Catananche

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #1404 on: Yesterday at 07:22:19 AM »
In Dutch we have the word Korps ( as in Korps Politie = police force) where the -p- is pronounced. We also have the word Corps where the -p- is silent. I love it that Dutch has borrowed so much from other languages that we have words with more or less the same meaning spelled and pronounced differently.

Mediancat

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #1405 on: Yesterday at 08:15:25 AM »
Huh! I learned something new today! I never knew the ps was silent.

And people wonder why it's so difficult to learn how to spell English ;)

That would make it sound like "Piece corpse," which would be a job for the medical examiner -- and possibly a jigsaw puzzle expert, depending on how many pieces you had.

Rob
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Shalamar

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #1406 on: Yesterday at 10:55:39 AM »
When I was a kid, I inadvertently pronounced the Grand Prix auto race as though it rhymed with "tricks".  Yeah.  My mother laughed until she cried and said "That's a different race altogether, dear."

LazyDaisy

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #1407 on: Yesterday at 01:02:40 PM »
I work on a student written/edited magazine. We had one submission that had me laughing even though it was intended to be a somber essay. The second line was "New Mexico's Chaco Canyon ruins—stone behemoths that served as trade centers for the Anasazi tribe, who dominated the entire Southwest a thousand years ago—teethed with strange energy." I'm pretty sure he meant teemed but it made it through 2 editors before it reached me and no one corrected it.

I had a young man email me changes to a brochure I was working on. He wanted to move the "amber sign" to the bottom of the brochure. I couldn't really figure out what "amber sign" meant even in context (there was a small yellow box with text in it -- so that was my guess). After some back and forth communication he meant this symbol --> & the ampersand. He's currently working on his MBA. I don't understand why, if he didn't really know the correct name for it or was having trouble spelling it, he didn't just call it the "and" symbol, or better yet, Google it first.

A spin on the Peace Corps vein...I know an adult who calls the popular U.S. lumber/tool store Home "De-pot" and they're not trying to be cutesy at all. I could understand if they had only heard it and didn't know how to spell it, but how do they not hear that no one else pronounces it like that?

Or he could have meant "seethed with strange energy". 

DH and I refer to the Home Depot as "the home despot" as a joke, although we do know how to pronounce it correctly!
From the context of the rest of the paragraph and essay, it sounded like the student was trying to convey teemed (be full of, be filled with, be alive with, be brimming with, abound in, etc) rather than seethed (be filled with intense but unexpressed anger; to surge or bubble up as a result of being boiled). I still giggle at the thought of a drooling, cranky desert ruin growing teeth with a strange energy.
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VorFemme

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #1408 on: Yesterday at 07:39:55 PM »
Huh! I learned something new today! I never knew the ps was silent.

And people wonder why it's so difficult to learn how to spell English ;)

That would make it sound like "Piece corpse," which would be a job for the medical examiner -- and possibly a jigsaw puzzle expert, depending on how many pieces you had.

Rob

On NCIS, Dr. Ducky Mallard referred to that as a "meat puzzle"...
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