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  • December 10, 2016, 11:01:15 PM

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Author Topic: Does/did your older pet act differently than when it was younger?  (Read 1824 times)

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HoneyBee42

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Re: Does/did your older pet act differently than when it was younger?
« Reply #15 on: October 22, 2016, 04:42:34 PM »
^ 28?!  That belongs in a record book somewhere, I'd think.
 
 

I think the current record-holding cat is 31!

We unfortunately couldn't prove her age as she was a shelter cat with no papers - but based on our very wonderful vet's experience we figured she was about twelve when we got her. Wouldn't have known it from watching her. :)
That sounds like Sam (my parents' cat when I was still living with my parents) ... he had come to us after his first owners died (mother and daughter, ages 90 and 60-something) within three months of each other.   The rest of their family lived far away, and they were just going to have Sam put down because none of them wanted him, so my dad said that he would much rather take Sam.  Sam had lived with the two ladies for twelve years, and had been an adult cat when he showed up, so had to be at least 13 when he became our cat.  He went on to live for eight years with us before his final illness (cancer), so at least 21.

Of course, Sam was already not exactly "younger" when I first met him, so I don't know if his behavior changed much from when he'd first showed up at his first house.

RegionMom

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Re: Does/did your older pet act differently than when it was younger?
« Reply #16 on: October 22, 2016, 05:27:46 PM »
My son had just turned 3 when we found our cat.  She is now 19, and no longer a scaredy cat.  People did not know we had a cat for over a decade!  She still likes to hide, but is no longer ghost cat when we have company.

She is also MUCH more determined to sample humsn food.  Till this past year, it was only my eating tuna that would attract her.  Now, anything!

Kitty is not showing signs of slowing down, but I had no idea we might still have her another decade! 

Both kids are out of the house now, (college and career) and she likes to hang in their empty bedrooms. 

We adopted an elderly dog years ago and he basically told us when he was ready to go.  Stopped eating, literally had a glory day and goodbye to the sunshine with entire family in the yard with him, and privately had a goodbye with each of us.  Even Kitty.  She has seen hamsters, dogs, a guinea pig, a lizard, mice, and fish, come and go. 

If only I could translate her meows!!
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Texas Mom

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Re: Does/did your older pet act differently than when it was younger?
« Reply #17 on: October 22, 2016, 10:57:49 PM »
My oldest dog is a 10 year old Pomeranian.  He has an immune disorder which eventually will be the end of him. so he's showing his age much earlier than a dog of his breed should.  He's more solitary and less social than he was when he was younger.

atirial

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Re: Does/did your older pet act differently than when it was younger?
« Reply #18 on: October 23, 2016, 11:36:56 AM »
Yes, although both cats were 'senior' when we got them, their behaviour did change as they got old. Stephen cut down the amount of time he spent outside, although he liked the door open to sniff the air. He was a lot more reluctant to get into fights than when he was younger, although he still loved people.

Matilda sleeps even more, if that is possible. We used to joke that all she wanted was her food and littertray by her sunny spot and she'd never move. Then we had to put them there due to building work and found out it wasn't a joke. She sulked for weeks when we moved them back! She has also got over her shyness to a degree and visitors might actually see her instead of thinking she's a ghost.

cb140

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Re: Does/did your older pet act differently than when it was younger?
« Reply #19 on: October 23, 2016, 12:49:46 PM »
Our cat is 14 and our dog is 10.

Our 14 year old cat is much gentler and more affectionate than she used to be. She was a real biter and scratcher when she was younger, but now she's desperate for love and attention and just wants to be cuddled. Other ageing things that we have noticed are mainly that she's not as continent as she was - she tends to go on the (tiled) floor just by the litter tray, and also that she is greedy greedy greedy! She is food obsessed, we don't dare leave food out in the kitchen that isn't tightly wrapped, and she's been known to get my husband's sandwiches down from the shelf in the hall where he's left them ready for work the next day, and eaten them (probably somewhat aided by the dog - but I know she will have been the ringleader, he just isn't greedy).

The dog is still just like a puppy. Nobody can believe he is 10.

Mergatroyd

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Re: Does/did your older pet act differently than when it was younger?
« Reply #20 on: October 23, 2016, 05:28:16 PM »
Our dog is 16.

He has slowed down a lot. He was very hyper when we got him 14 years ago, and now we have too co-erce him to go outside for a leak. He is still quite happy though, and moves well enough to hike with us off trail. His eyesight is not what it was and he is pretty near deaf, but other than that it is hard to tell his age most days.

Julian

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Re: Does/did your older pet act differently than when it was younger?
« Reply #21 on: October 23, 2016, 07:35:38 PM »
Morty is 17 on Halloween.

He hasn't really changed much at all.  He's never been a good groomer, never been a lap cat.  He's always craved attention and talked up a blue streak.  He has never been a big eater.

The major change is he's just slowing down a bit.  He can no longer leap 9 feet to the top of the fence (from a sitting start) and land perfectly - he struggles a bit to get up on the bed.  The vet says he's getting a bit stiff in the joints now, and I keep an electric blanket on 'his' bed to warm the old chap up.  He's also getting a bit fussy with food, and is getting skinny - I've had to change his food a couple of times when he just lost interest, but he's doing OK now.  He also gave up hunting, thankfully - this is the boy that used to bring home live snakes and leave them in the house...

Otherwise, he's just as tolerant, as talkative, as loving and contrary as he ever has been.  The old dear still sits out on the deck all day supervising the dogs, he takes no guff from Salem (6), he warns off the neighbour's cats and he'll even reciprocate the doggy kisses he gets.

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Betelnut

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Re: Does/did your older pet act differently than when it was younger?
« Reply #22 on: October 24, 2016, 09:45:47 AM »
Yes, definitely.  My cat--he's about 15--is sooo much more vocal now.  Plus, more inappropriate urination and defecation.  Yuck.

But the meowing is much more intense, loud and frequent.
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FlyingBaconMouse

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Re: Does/did your older pet act differently than when it was younger?
« Reply #23 on: October 24, 2016, 12:01:07 PM »
Inky is 11 and has become much more physically affectionate the past year or so—though I think that's in part because my other cat, Jasper, passed away at 17 last year. Jasper was always a lap cat, and Inky never was before; he's half Himalayan, and I think he doesn't like having his fur messed up by being handled too much! Inky will now climb on me if I'm sitting or lying still, I think because he realizes I miss it. It's very sweet.

On the other hand, the loud meeping, running in fright from his own toys, and what he fondly considers covering his 'business' in the litter box (it's not; he just wipes his paws on the side of the box and wonders why these things aren't magically getting covered) have been the same since he was 8 weeks old.
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DanaJ

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Re: Does/did your older pet act differently than when it was younger?
« Reply #24 on: December 08, 2016, 11:18:23 AM »
Male cats are known for turning into the biggest sucks when they age. Ours was no exception.

currently we have a 14 year old who is built like a tank. When she fell from the second floor trying something reckless involving the railing in the hallway, we rushed her to the vet. She was fine, but had estimated her age at 6, until we corrected them. Aside from being much, much grumpier in her old age, she's frighteningly fine (really does look and act like a 6-year-old). She has the occasional litter box accident, but maily because she's tall and sometimes sticks her butt out the opening when she goes, so we keep her box on a plastic matt.

DP had a 20-something cat who was very, very senile in her final years with dementia. She would sit and meow into a corner. She was otherwise in decent health, so she went to live with my MIL who could give her a lot more supervision. She would carry her around all day, draped over her arm like a panther in a tree.

TracyXJ

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Re: Does/did your older pet act differently than when it was younger?
« Reply #25 on: December 08, 2016, 02:22:06 PM »
Our dogs are 7 and 7.5.  Being lab mixes, they've finally stopped acting like puppies all the time. 

I wish our slightly older one would just stop chewing when we aren't home.  We hoped he'd grow out of it. I think he has separation anxiety, because he only does it when we're gone, but not every time.  And he ignore toys and goes for things that are bad for him.  Like the carpet on the stairs in their basement...  He severely damaged the woodwork in an apartment bathroom then one time we tried that.  We've tried the sprays that are supposed to taste icky and even rubbing habaneroes (peppers) on the stuff he chews on.  He seems to like the taste and goes back for more!