Hostesses With The Mostest > Entertaining and Hospitality

Asked to bring food

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missmew:
My friends have a habit of inviting me to get-togethers at their house, at the last minute, and asking me to bring specific things, like shrimp rings, or once, a bottle of expensive liquor. They don't ask everyone, it's not like it's a pot-luck.
Am I wrong in thinking this is rude? They aren't poor. I think they just weren't raised properly. (For instance, no one got thank-you notes for their wedding presents.)
Is there a polite way to decline to bring anything the next time they ask?

megswsu:
"Oh. I didn't realize it was a pot luck?"   Or is that too snarky?

Whatever you choose to say, unless you've offered to bring something or it's a stated pot luck, they should not be asking you to get anything for the dinner. But that's just me as a hostess. If I invite people over, I'm doing all the work and should be prepared. I mean if they needed plastic cups I could see asking a guest to make a quick stop, maybe. But a last minute food item? Um, no. They need to plan better. Sorry. Wish I had some better advice. Maybe someone else will!  :-\

ShadesOfGrey:
how about "I'm sorry, I wont have time to pick that up before the get together.  See you in a few minutes."  "Gee, I am really strapped right now, I wont be able to. See you in about 15."

good luck.

Bob Ducca:
Drat you, Rdge!!  I agree completely.

And I would begin declining her invitations, and I would be tempted to say, if asked, that it was because I couldn't afford to attend her dinners anymore.  Not that I would, but it would be tempted...

Lisbeth:
Tell your friends, "I'm sorry but I won't be able to do that."

Lather, rinse, repeat.

If these are really good friends who won't be too offended, you might tell them, "I'd really appreciate not being asked to bring things with me when I attend your parties.  It makes me feel like I'm being charged an attendance fee."

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