Hostesses With The Mostest > Entertaining and Hospitality

No, please, don't bring anything

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kiero:
Evern in my family where people all brings things for even fancy meals this would be wrong. 

If the host says no.  Then that means no. 

april:
SO wrong.

It would be one thing if, as you said, there was a very specific dietary requirement (like kosher, vegan, gluten, etc.), but even then, you should both ask and clear it with the host.  I know that if I had a vegan guest, I would be quite comfortable preparing something for them, but if my guest were keeping kosher, I would rather the help....kwim?

I hate it when people do that.  They're usually people who consider all-you-can-eat to be a gourmet treat.  Yuck.

twinkletoes:
Thank you all for your responses!  My coworker told this story to me and another coworker, and the second coworker responded with "what's the big deal?"  It's not the be-all and end-all, but I don't blame my coworker for feeling frustrated and angered with her SiL. 

Sterling:
See if she does more formal gathering and her in-laws do casual I would feel like her that there was a message that my way was "wrong" in thier eyes.

I love to cook and tend to try new fancy meals, however I make sure nothing so strange other wouldn't want to eat it.  If I worked really hard on a feast and someone demanded jello I think I would be hurt.  My mother cooks huge meals for my grandparents (my fathers family) and my grandfather loves to ask her half way through for a peanut butter sandwich.  Its his way of making fun of her cooking since its not "country" enough for him.

Olivia:
Jello?  Really?  That's just too funny. 

Yes, SIL was in the wrong, but at least your co-worker got a good story out of it. 

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