Author Topic: "can't you just take some aspirin?"  (Read 18911 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Sirius

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 10017
  • Stars in my eyes!
Re: "can't you just take some aspirin?"
« Reply #60 on: April 15, 2008, 01:59:53 AM »

Also don't forget the electric shock sensations going off inside your brain, the ones that make your head feel like a Van der Graaf generator... fun fun fun!

oh yea...  and the SOUND of that!!  sizzle sizzle crackle pop snap
but really loud

And the violent spinning vertigo that sometimes goes with them (hence my username, actually!)

The first time it happened I thought I was having a stroke - it terrified me.

Now? Meh, I just live with it, and try not to let it freak me out.

I get the vertigo, but not the head pain.  I get a woozy, kind of wasted feeling that lasts minutes to hours, and eventually the spinning starts.  Sometimes it stops after a few minutes, and other times it stops after three days.  Once the spinning stops, it's as though I'm hung over and all I want to do is sleep in my living room chair because that's more comfortable than lying flat in bed.  Sometimes I'm able to take meclizine and get the wooziness to stop; other times it doesn't work and I just have to live through it.  I also often get a headache after the spinning, but nothing like what you poor souls are describing.  I've had this since Christmas 1990, and it also freaked me out the first few times it happened. 

I've been told this is benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, but in view of what I've been reading here I'm wondering if maybe what I've got is a migraine variant.  I should talk to my provider.   (Walks off saying "hmmmm..." to self.)

Miss Vertigo

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1754
Re: "can't you just take some aspirin?"
« Reply #61 on: April 15, 2008, 02:24:34 AM »
Sirius, there's a thing called "Migraine Associated Vertigo" that might be worth looking into. I've been told I have BPPV too but in my case it's definitely associated with my migraines.

I'm getting one today; I've woken up (it's 7.15am here) and I can just feel it - just know it's on the way. Head's all woozy, feel very confused, the light in the room looks off, can't quite prise my eyes open fully (that's a really odd one - I don't know why. They just - don't want to open). Really nasty anxiety too - don't want to leave my bedroom - and I have this feeling like I'm about to burst into tears for no reason. Everything feels 'floaty' and I have goosebumps, and cold sensations all over my upper body.

This is how my auras tend to manifest themselves, rather than with flashing lights and stuff - does anyone else get these sensory auras?

I've got a really important day at work today that I just can't afford to miss, and if I call in I'll be in BIG trouble :(

Triggers - I know what's done it. Yesterday I had a very, very tough day emotionally (BF issues) and a bag of flavoured crisps, no doubt loaded with MSG. There's the combo thing. My own fault.

blue2000

  • It is never too late to be what you might have been
  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 6884
  • Two kitties - No waiting. And no sleeping either.
Re: "can't you just take some aspirin?"
« Reply #62 on: April 15, 2008, 06:24:17 AM »

I get the vertigo, but not the head pain.  I get a woozy, kind of wasted feeling that lasts minutes to hours, and eventually the spinning starts.  Sometimes it stops after a few minutes, and other times it stops after three days.  Once the spinning stops, it's as though I'm hung over and all I want to do is sleep in my living room chair because that's more comfortable than lying flat in bed.  Sometimes I'm able to take meclizine and get the wooziness to stop; other times it doesn't work and I just have to live through it.  I also often get a headache after the spinning, but nothing like what you poor souls are describing.  I've had this since Christmas 1990, and it also freaked me out the first few times it happened. 

I've been told this is benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, but in view of what I've been reading here I'm wondering if maybe what I've got is a migraine variant.  I should talk to my provider.   (Walks off saying "hmmmm..." to self.)

*saying hmmm.... with Sirius*

My sympathies to you, Sirius. I get dizzy spells myself. They have been driving me crazy. But I don't usually get them with the migraines. It is an either/or situation. Now I have to wonder if they are connected!!!

But I've never come up with anything to stop the migraines. Just blunt the pain. So I still wouldn't be able to do anything. :(
You are only young once. After that you have to think up some other excuse.

ChristiKayAnn

  • Guest
Re: "can't you just take some aspirin?"
« Reply #63 on: April 15, 2008, 01:06:16 PM »
Triggers: really strong perfumes, peanuts, some chemicals (have to be careful about brand names with cleaners, bathroom cleaners tend to be the worst culprit), MSG...

AFwife_3boys

  • Guest
Re: "can't you just take some aspirin?"
« Reply #64 on: April 15, 2008, 04:07:49 PM »
I would have SMACKED that guy - and then some!

I have gotten migraines ever since I was 14 years old which now adds up to 16 years. They are genetic in my family and, usually, come on with the onset of menstruation.

I used to get between 10-15 a MONTH and some would last upwards of 8-10 days. Finally I got on Pamlor to keep them from happening and Imitrex shots for the pain.  Now I usually only get 1-2 a month, if that, and I can go a couple months without a long-laster. However, when I get a long-laster only a trip to the chiropractor, a shot of Tordol in the emergency room or a massage will get rid of it. Sometimes I actually need all three. It's horrendous!

In addition - name a symptom of a migraine and I get it. Everything from the "fog" a few days prior to one (the other person had a "proper" name for it, I just call it the "fog"), the chills, the nausea, the sensitivity to light and sound (and I mean running to the bathroom and puking if a I see light or hear sound), and etc.

My husband, when we were first dating, used to say "Can't you just take an aspirin or motrin" but after being together for 6+ years and married for 6 years he has now literally SEEN the pain a migraine causes me and no longer uses that line.

For people that do not get migraines they do not understand that a migraine is NOTHING like a headache. NOTHING! A migraine, even if it only lasts a few hours, can have DAYS worth of before-effects or aftereffects or BOTH, not to mention the severity of the pain!

I think your coworker was immensely insensitive and I feel that you should help to see what a migraine is through a true sufferer. Take a ball-pin hammer to his head - LOL!

Sorry he was so rude, but I think you handled yourself beautifully and WAY better than I would have handled it!


AFwife_3boys

  • Guest
Re: "can't you just take some aspirin?"
« Reply #65 on: April 15, 2008, 04:10:01 PM »
As a 15-year veteran of the 5-day migraine (plus the hangover, plus the prodrome), I'm just coming out to offer some support and a hug.

You're right, as with most medical conditions, I guess, it's impossible to understand unless you've had one.

What's the prodome?

The hangover part can be fun.. I get ravenously hungry.  I just inhale everything in my path.

Prodrome is the bit where you feel odd for a few hours or days beforehand, prior to the aura, when you know one's on the way. There's a really good post about it at The Daily Headache, called "The Many Symptoms of Migraine". I'm not sure if I'm allowed to link directly to it but if you Google it, you should find it fairly easily. It's a great blog, actually. Well worth a read for any migraineur :)

I crave carbs during the hangover. And I either feel like I've just gone ten rounds with Mike Tyson, or ridiculously energised and euphoric. It's really odd!

You and I have very similar symptoms of hangover! I, too, crave carbs but, usually, I feel majorly energized after a migraine. The only time I don't is if it's one of my long-lasting, many days of severe pain, just want to curl in a ball and sleep now that it's over, migraines. LOL!

AFwife_3boys

  • Guest
Re: "can't you just take some aspirin?"
« Reply #66 on: April 15, 2008, 04:19:56 PM »
OH - my triggers:

1) Cranberries - this was pregnancy induced. When I was pg with my third son I got violently sick with a migraine that lasted almost 10 days. It was awful. At first we thought I was just dehydrated but when I stopped adding cranberry juice to my water the migraine went away. We retested it and, sure enough, I am now allergic to cranberries. Even one taste/sip/whatever and I'll be in a room for days!

2) Sunlight - I have to wear sunglasses at all times outside (even on cloudy days) otherwise it's migraine time

3) Hunger

4) Fatigue

5) Dehydration (which is a HUGE one for me because I LOATHE water and live in a VERY hot climate area)

I also get muscle tension migraines that are brought on by sleeping weird, staying on the computer to long, watching TV to long etc.

However, for me - I do not get "regular" headaches. It's either a migraine or my head doesn't hurt at all! Which REALLY sucks and means I have to be EXTRA vigilant about avoiding triggers or I'd spend 90% of my life in my bed, in my cool bedroom, with the lights off - LOL!


Miss Vertigo

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1754
Re: "can't you just take some aspirin?"
« Reply #67 on: April 15, 2008, 05:18:26 PM »

In addition - name a symptom of a migraine and I get it. Everything from the "fog" a few days prior to one (the other person had a "proper" name for it, I just call it the "fog"), the chills, the nausea, the sensitivity to light and sound (and I mean running to the bathroom and puking if a I see light or hear sound), and etc.


It's amazing how many different body systems are affected by migraine. I get pretty much all of them too, and here's a sad story that illustrates how misunderstood migraine is by the medical profession.

When I was in my mid 20s, and had been having migraines for about five years or so, I was misdiagnosed with panic disorder. It was only later on that I worked out (for myself) that my bouts of severe anxiety were actually a part of my migraine prodrome.

Due to the misdiagnosis, I spent the next few years on a whole host of SSRIs, beta blockers and eventually, Valium, for the 'anxiety'. The GP left me on Valium for six months, but I was tolerant to it after a month.

It took me six months to withdraw safely from it on a controlled taper. Three weeks after my last dose, my immune system went crazy and I was hospitalised with double pneumonia. After that, the real fun started - I was sick with protracted benzodiazepene withdrawal for two years after my final dose. I still occasionally have problems due to the withdrawal. Sometimes, five years later, the symptoms come back to bite me in the a**.

All because my migraine was misdiagnosed as anxiety.

You'd think that'd be the end of it, right?

Wrong.

After I moved to London, I sought an appointment with a neurologist to try and get the migraines under control. I waited months for this appointment. I was so excited that maybe, they'd get to the root of the problem and offer me something to help. So, off I went; I answered all of his questions as best as I could, explaining how the prodrome affects me as well as the pain stage, and the hangover, etc etc.

He took one look at my notes, told me I was 'untreatable' because didn't fit neatly into any of his boxes, looked over the rim of his glasses at me and said "I'm sure there's help out there for you dear, but maybe it should come from the Royal College of Psychiatrists, rather than the Royal College of Physicians".

At that point, I broke down and cried in his office (which I'm sure strengthened his case, but by that time I had nothing else left to do.)

His response to that was to offer me major tranquilisers and an antidepressant - to treat my migraine.

I left in tears and never went back.

Two weeks later, I got a copy of the letter he'd written to my GP, labelling me as neurotic, anxious, and 'resisting treatment', because I refused to ingest a major tranquiliser for a neurological condition. That letter now forms a part of my medical records.

All because people, including the neurologists who are supposed to treat us, do not have the first clue about the symptoms of migraine.




skbenny

  • Guest
Re: "can't you just take some aspirin?"
« Reply #68 on: April 15, 2008, 10:26:43 PM »
His response to that was to offer me major tranquilisers and an antidepressant - to treat my migraine.

I left in tears and never went back.

Two weeks later, I got a copy of the letter he'd written to my GP, labelling me as neurotic, anxious, and 'resisting treatment', because I refused to ingest a major tranquiliser for a neurological condition. That letter now forms a part of my medical records.

All because people, including the neurologists who are supposed to treat us, do not have the first clue about the symptoms of migraine.

Your doctor has a match in the U.S.  I had a neurologist do the exact same thing to me.  Only I was on work leave after surgery and he wouldn't sign the paperwork so I could return to work and I refused to take his antidepressants.  Oh well, my new job pays better.  I waited until I got to my car before I burst into tears :'(

goblue2539

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3343
  • Caffeine makes the world go 'round.
Re: "can't you just take some aspirin?"
« Reply #69 on: April 24, 2008, 09:55:56 PM »
A little late to the thread, but I wanted to add my apologies for admitting to a wrong diagnosis.  I have never had a migraine as has been described here.  I do watch, because my mom didn't start getting them until after she'd had my brother at 41. 

As for the wrong description, I really did think a migraine was coming out of my sinus headache.  One-sided, eye popping out, sensitivity to light.... obviously from the tales of true experiences I wasn't even close.  I'm sorry that I inadvertently minimized your pain to someone else by answering yes to that question.  And I hope that relief will be available someday soon for all of you. 

Warbaby

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2544
  • "Duty, Honor, Country"
Re: "can't you just take some aspirin?"
« Reply #70 on: May 18, 2008, 10:23:22 AM »
First of all, I am not, nor have I ever been, a doctor.  Second of all, I have never had a migraine, but I did watch my Beloved suffer through them at least once a month.

After having read this entire thread and noting all the symptoms; aura/prodrome, blinding headache, sensitivity to light and noise, after effects, I just wonder if anyone, either in the medical profession or those who suffer from migraines, has compared these symptoms to epileptic seizures?

Reason I ask:  I had a dear friend who was an epileptic and the symptoms he described are an almost exact fit for what you migraine sufferers are describing.  He just never had the headache.

Is there any medical research facility looking into migraines?  What they really are and what causes them?  I think it would be most interesting to compare brain wave activity for both disorders.
"May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live." - R. Heinlein

Miss Vertigo

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1754
Re: "can't you just take some aspirin?"
« Reply #71 on: May 18, 2008, 11:04:56 AM »
Warbaby, that's a very interesting point. Migraine and epilepsy are very close cousins, both neurological conditions, often co-morbid, and share a very similar symptom pattern. Someone very dear to me has epilepsy and although his seizures have been controlled by medication for years, we're regularly struck down by very similar 'peripheral' symptoms, and oddly, usually at the same time (atmospheric pressure, possibly?). The prodrome/aura phases in particular can be very similar, and I know he gets bad headaches associated with his epilepsy which, from his description, sound exactly like my migraines.

There's been quite a bit of research done around it. There's a very interesting document here: http://www.jhasim.com/files/articlefiles/pdf/XASIM_Issue_5_6E_p658_665.pdf (it's a big ole file at 1.7mb, but a good read), and anti-convulsants are regularly used as migraine preventatives, Topamax being the most common, I think.

There was a news story here in the UK a couple of weeks ago about children with epilepsy who had managed to reduce their seizures by anything up to 85% through following a ketogenic diet. It got me to wondering whether this might also be effective for migraine sufferers, and whether it might work for adults, as well as children.

On another note: I've got an appointment with the neurologist tomorrow morning, another attempt to get some help to get my migraines under control. I'm somewhat nervous, given the disaster that was my last neuro appointment, so any good luck thoughts would be very gratefully received :)
« Last Edit: May 18, 2008, 11:06:29 AM by Miss Vertigo »

Miss Vertigo

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1754
Re: "can't you just take some aspirin?"
« Reply #72 on: May 18, 2008, 11:09:29 AM »
His response to that was to offer me major tranquilisers and an antidepressant - to treat my migraine.

I left in tears and never went back.

Two weeks later, I got a copy of the letter he'd written to my GP, labelling me as neurotic, anxious, and 'resisting treatment', because I refused to ingest a major tranquiliser for a neurological condition. That letter now forms a part of my medical records.

All because people, including the neurologists who are supposed to treat us, do not have the first clue about the symptoms of migraine.

Your doctor has a match in the U.S.  I had a neurologist do the exact same thing to me.  Only I was on work leave after surgery and he wouldn't sign the paperwork so I could return to work and I refused to take his antidepressants.  Oh well, my new job pays better.  I waited until I got to my car before I burst into tears :'(


I'm so sorry I missed your reply to me, skbenny. I'm also sorry you had to go through that too - I know how humiliating it can be. Here's hoping we all get some relief soon!

Warbaby

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2544
  • "Duty, Honor, Country"
Re: "can't you just take some aspirin?"
« Reply #73 on: May 18, 2008, 11:48:34 AM »
Warbaby, that's a very interesting point. Migraine and epilepsy are very close cousins, both neurological conditions, often co-morbid, and share a very similar symptom pattern. Someone very dear to me has epilepsy and although his seizures have been controlled by medication for years, we're regularly struck down by very similar 'peripheral' symptoms, and oddly, usually at the same time (atmospheric pressure, possibly?). The prodrome/aura phases in particular can be very similar, and I know he gets bad headaches associated with his epilepsy which, from his description, sound exactly like my migraines.

There's been quite a bit of research done around it. There's a very interesting document here: http://www.jhasim.com/files/articlefiles/pdf/XASIM_Issue_5_6E_p658_665.pdf (it's a big ole file at 1.7mb, but a good read), and anti-convulsants are regularly used as migraine preventatives, Topamax being the most common, I think.

There was a news story here in the UK a couple of weeks ago about children with epilepsy who had managed to reduce their seizures by anything up to 85% through following a ketogenic diet. It got me to wondering whether this might also be effective for migraine sufferers, and whether it might work for adults, as well as children.

On another note: I've got an appointment with the neurologist tomorrow morning, another attempt to get some help to get my migraines under control. I'm somewhat nervous, given the disaster that was my last neuro appointment, so any good luck thoughts would be very gratefully received :)

Whew!!  Most of that was waay over my head, but I did pick up that, although there are similarities, the EEG tracing is significantly different as are the blood flow patterns within the brain. 

You may have a point on atmospheric conditions, especially changes in pressure, being a trigger for both disorders.  I know that I have a couple of disorders that allow me to tell what the weather is going to be just from the changes in barometric pressure.  My sinuses seem to be especially sensitive to those changes.

You have the wishes for good luck and continuing good thoughts for you.  Also, if I may be allowed, a virtual grandfatherly hug to you.  Let us know how things turn out.
"May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live." - R. Heinlein

skbenny

  • Guest
Re: "can't you just take some aspirin?"
« Reply #74 on: May 18, 2008, 12:30:39 PM »
His response to that was to offer me major tranquilisers and an antidepressant - to treat my migraine.

I left in tears and never went back.

Two weeks later, I got a copy of the letter he'd written to my GP, labelling me as neurotic, anxious, and 'resisting treatment', because I refused to ingest a major tranquiliser for a neurological condition. That letter now forms a part of my medical records.

All because people, including the neurologists who are supposed to treat us, do not have the first clue about the symptoms of migraine.

Your doctor has a match in the U.S.  I had a neurologist do the exact same thing to me.  Only I was on work leave after surgery and he wouldn't sign the paperwork so I could return to work and I refused to take his antidepressants.  Oh well, my new job pays better.  I waited until I got to my car before I burst into tears :'(


I'm so sorry I missed your reply to me, skbenny. I'm also sorry you had to go through that too - I know how humiliating it can be. Here's hoping we all get some relief soon!