Author Topic: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)  (Read 112616 times)

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Animala

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Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
« Reply #285 on: November 07, 2008, 11:40:16 AM »
OK, that sounds like one of the silliest ideas ever.

caranfin

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Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
« Reply #286 on: November 07, 2008, 02:59:02 PM »
I don't. He said it was a company that teaches people how to shop online.

Yes, I'm sure that's what he was told to tell people.  ::)
He was not at all afraid to be killed in nasty ways.

kingsrings

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Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
« Reply #287 on: November 07, 2008, 03:08:26 PM »
I don't know. But I don't think I'm interested enough to want to attend this meeting thing. Now the hard part is telling him, as he is rather pushy, although a good friend.

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Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
« Reply #288 on: November 16, 2008, 11:15:19 PM »
I don't know. But I don't think I'm interested enough to want to attend this meeting thing. Now the hard part is telling him, as he is rather pushy, although a good friend.

I was reading someone on another forum who said they got sucked into a scam involving a company that "taught people how to search online". That particular one turned out to be a load of crock once you scratched below the surface-- but I have no way of knowing if this is the same one or not.

Just Lori

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Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
« Reply #289 on: November 17, 2008, 06:29:14 AM »
Re:  the e-commerce meeting.

It could be this:
http://www.multilevelstore.com/


kingsrings

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Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
« Reply #290 on: November 17, 2008, 01:11:01 PM »
Hmm....I am wondering if that was what he was talking about. Do you know anything more about this, specifically whether it is a scam or not?

Harriet Jones

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Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
« Reply #291 on: November 17, 2008, 01:23:03 PM »
Even if it isn't a scam, it's pretty hard to make much $$ with a MLM. http://www.skepdic.com/mlm.html

Just Lori

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Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
« Reply #292 on: November 17, 2008, 05:17:21 PM »
Hmm....I am wondering if that was what he was talking about. Do you know anything more about this, specifically whether it is a scam or not?

I do not.  However, I would proceed cautiously.  Aside from a few Mary Kay women in pink cars, I know precious few people who've succeeded in MLMs and quite a few who have lost money.

Shoo

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Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
« Reply #293 on: November 17, 2008, 10:59:18 PM »
Hmm....I am wondering if that was what he was talking about. Do you know anything more about this, specifically whether it is a scam or not?

I do not.  However, I would proceed cautiously.  Aside from a few Mary Kay women in pink cars, I know precious few people who've succeeded in MLMs and quite a few who have lost money.

And even those Mary Kay ladies who manage to get the car are in up to their eyeballs in debt for their inventories they had to purchase.  And the cars are leased for them.  If they decide to quit the business, they have to pay off the balance of their leases.  A friend of mine had to pay over $9,000 to get out, when she turned her car in.  That doesn't include the cost of the inventory she had to get rid of.  She lost a bundle.  It's going to take a long time for her to recover financially.  Mary Kay is the debbil.

Just Lori

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Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
« Reply #294 on: November 18, 2008, 06:26:40 AM »
Hmm....I am wondering if that was what he was talking about. Do you know anything more about this, specifically whether it is a scam or not?

I do not.  However, I would proceed cautiously.  Aside from a few Mary Kay women in pink cars, I know precious few people who've succeeded in MLMs and quite a few who have lost money.

And even those Mary Kay ladies who manage to get the car are in up to their eyeballs in debt for their inventories they had to purchase.  And the cars are leased for them.  If they decide to quit the business, they have to pay off the balance of their leases.  A friend of mine had to pay over $9,000 to get out, when she turned her car in.  That doesn't include the cost of the inventory she had to get rid of.  She lost a bundle.  It's going to take a long time for her to recover financially.  Mary Kay is the debbil.

I didn't know that about Mary Kay.

We have two couples in our family who are always pursuing the MLM that's going to make them rich.  Coincidentally, these are the only two couples in the family who ever filed for bankruptcy.   The one husband is always traveling for his "businesss."  We thought, well maybe he's making a go at this one - after all, he is a chiropractor and the MLM involves supplements and other medical devices.   Maybe he has a winning combination.  I did a little research and discovered that this company requires a lot of training seminars, all on your own dime.  It's no wonder they can't make any money.

Tia2

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Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
« Reply #295 on: November 18, 2008, 03:25:11 PM »
Hmm....I am wondering if that was what he was talking about. Do you know anything more about this, specifically whether it is a scam or not?

I do not.  However, I would proceed cautiously.  Aside from a few Mary Kay women in pink cars, I know precious few people who've succeeded in MLMs and quite a few who have lost money.

And even those Mary Kay ladies who manage to get the car are in up to their eyeballs in debt for their inventories they had to purchase.  And the cars are leased for them.  If they decide to quit the business, they have to pay off the balance of their leases.  A friend of mine had to pay over $9,000 to get out, when she turned her car in.  That doesn't include the cost of the inventory she had to get rid of.  She lost a bundle.  It's going to take a long time for her to recover financially.  Mary Kay is the debbil.

I vaguely looked into Mary Kay, which is just starting to try to break into the UK market (I decided that selling wasn't for me whether MLM or not).  One of the first sites I found was pinktruth.com which convinced me I wasn't going anywhere near it!

SilverOrb

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Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
« Reply #296 on: March 26, 2013, 10:39:42 AM »
Anyone here get suckered into any of the cookware sales from bridal shows?  It was a new one on me, but I'm lucky in that I'm not desperate for the "free" vacation and my fiance always has his laptop available to research at the drop of a hat.  I've gotten three calls in the last month, the last two refusing to say what kind of cookware they were selling, despite being asked point blank at least three times. 

I think it was Regency cookware, but I can't swear to it.  There's another one under the same corporation but by a different name.  If you know anyone who's getting married, give them the warning, please!

CRUD MONKEYS! it was a scheme! They tried to get me... I told them it seemed too good to be true. Then they refused to meet with me without my fiance. Hahahaha nope!

Emmy

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Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
« Reply #297 on: March 27, 2013, 02:15:47 PM »
I had my own experience with Amway/Quixtar.  I mostly bought the products for myself at the discount, and passed the catalogs around to friends or family (most people didn't order citing the stuff was too expensive and much of it could be purchased at the store for cheaper).  I hate being pushed and hate pushing other people.  I was skeptical and didn't subscribe to the 'sell your soul to Amway' mentality and didn't go the expensive conferences buy the tapes, ect. they were trying to push.  I did waste a few Saturdays sitting through meetings at people's houses and evenings after work traveling 20 minutes one direction to pick up my deliveries.  Personally I find doing work with my hands that is guaranteed to earn money much more satisfying that trying to push product/recruitment onto people which is not guaranteed to make money.  Selling, managing several downlines, ect. is also a time consuming job that usually doesn't pay as much as a real job (except for the few at the top of the pyramid).

Many of these MLM's seem to work through churches.  In the Bible, it says 'the love of money leads to all kinds of evil' and not to covet, yet so many uplines try to entice potential downlines by telling them they will be rich, rich, rich and showing them brochures of fancy houses, vacations, and cars.

jedikaiti

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Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
« Reply #298 on: March 28, 2013, 02:16:37 AM »
Anyone here get suckered into any of the cookware sales from bridal shows?  It was a new one on me, but I'm lucky in that I'm not desperate for the "free" vacation and my fiance always has his laptop available to research at the drop of a hat.  I've gotten three calls in the last month, the last two refusing to say what kind of cookware they were selling, despite being asked point blank at least three times. 

I think it was Regency cookware, but I can't swear to it.  There's another one under the same corporation but by a different name.  If you know anyone who's getting married, give them the warning, please!

CRUD MONKEYS! it was a scheme! They tried to get me... I told them it seemed too good to be true. Then they refused to meet with me without my fiance. Hahahaha nope!

I keep getting calls about Ameri-something from bridal shows. I saw their cookware, and knives, and wedding bands at the shows. The bands look good, but I could buy them for about 1/4 the price on Amazon, and DF, being a chef, would laugh at me and leave if I brought home the garbage knives & cookware. :-) OK, he wouldn't leave, but he'd laugh. Especially if I paid money for any of it.

Mary Kay reps are EVERYWHERE when you're planning a wedding. They make me glad I signed up for a special Google Voice # for wedding planning stuff.

I have a few Cutco knives - Mom knew someone who was selling them, and got guilt-tripped into buying some about the same time I moved into my first real apartment on my own. Great knives, they have served me well for years. Way better than the Ginsu that were acquired for me at a Berkshire-Hathaway shareholder's convention because they're better than nothing. Not a lot better, but they work when you're young and first starting out on your own.

Once, when I was young and unemployed, a friend referred me to an acquaintance who needed occasional computer help. She ended up needing weekly help, and I started charging her whatever would get me out of her house without owing her change later (she paid with only $100 bills, and I never carried cash). She sold something involving magnets and water filters and tried to sell me on it. Uh, no.

Another friend used to sell the jewelry (I think the same line that's been mentioned earlier in the thread), but gave it up as buying the samples to show people was just way too much $. She now sells a non-MK makeup line that doesn't require buying stock up front - they ship right to the customer. It's some pretty nice stuff, and no more expensive than the department store makeup, so I usually buy what little I use from her. And DH adores their men's products - work great on his skin. It helps that she's not the type to do the full Kool-aid hard-sell recruitment thing. If you're interested, she'll help you out. If not, no worries!
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Waterlight

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Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
« Reply #299 on: April 22, 2013, 10:24:53 PM »
I have a close friend who sells Pampered Chef and have bought a couple of things from her--but they're things I would've bought anyway, and, like jedikaiti's friend, she's not the type to do high-pressure sales or recruitment tactics.  She is also very honest about the sales parties she hosts; she'll tell you right up front that it's a Pampered Chef party. 

That's nothing at all like the experience I had with Amway in the fall of 1995:

I was "prospected" while walking home from the grocery store. The nice man who offered to help carry my bags talked to me about an opportunity to start my own business. It sounded pretty good. I was recently out of school, and looking for work. We exchanged phone numbers.

I called him back, and we arranged to meet at a coffee shop on a Sunday afternoon to discuss this "opportunity." He drew the circles, quoted some statistics, and asked me about my "dream."

Several things bothered me. When the guy drew the circles for me, he commented, "Some people will look at this and say, 'pyramid.' But then, aren't most businesses structured that way?" He emphasized the legality and honesty of "the business"--which until then I hadn't thought to question. Methinks the man did protest too much!  ::)

He also equated "being successful" with making money. The elderly and the poor were "burdens." Diamonds and furs could be mine if I joined the business. He asked me what I would be willing to give up for all those material goods.

What bothered me most was that his personal story sounded entirely too much like a religious testimony. It can be summed up in a few sentences: 1. I was once just like you; 2. Here's what I was doing (exaggerating how awful, boring, etc. it was, of course) before I "got saved" by the business; 3. I had doubts at first, but 4. once I was "saved," it changed my life; 5. My life is wonderful now, and yours can be too!  (I already have a religion--I don't need another.)

Only at the end of the story was Amway mentioned.

He encouraged me to "check the facts" and listen to some tapes. I passed on the tapes, but said I would check the facts, and call him back once I had. I never did call him.

In the course of "checking the facts" I found several books and Web pages critical of Amway, and was horrified at what I found out. The "personal story" I'd heard had been plagiarized from an Amway tape.  I had a 99%+ chance of losing money I could ill afford to lose. (At the time, I was living on a grocery budget of about $20 per week.  Just to give you an idea...)  And in order to "be successful" in Amway, I would have had to give up all the things in my life that were and are central to who I am--my faith, my family, my friends, my writing, my music--in order to "show the plan" five or six nights a week.

In short, it was not worth it.
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