Author Topic: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)  (Read 105638 times)

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geordicat

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Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
« Reply #195 on: January 19, 2008, 08:24:26 PM »
Amway is VERY cult-ish speaking as one who was involved with it for 3+ years (I'm sorry!  I know better now!)
They sold my DH on it using the old "American Dream" dream scenario - work like the devil for 5 years and relax and have time for the kids then.  One of his daughters had a game or something (this was all 20+ years ago) and he was loading up the car for a meeting,  telling her he couldn't go.  She was disappointed of course, and he was explaining he was doing these meetings for HER and he would be able to retire in 5 years, etc, etc.  She looked him in the eye and said "Dad, in 5 years I'll be in college and I'll be too busy to spend any time with you then."  Cue Harry Chapin music - Dad started unpacking the car and that was the last Amway we ever did.
As you moved up in the levels, they had reading lists for the women: how to support your busy husband, how to care for the details and leave him free to concentrate on business, how to dress, talk, act.  They even made special trips to shop for clothing all together so everyone could 'help' with your choices.  They made the Stepford Wives look like a bunch of wild, tattooed biker babes! (speaking as a formerly wild, still tattooed biker not so much a babe anymore ;D)

that's spooky
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seren

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Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
« Reply #196 on: January 19, 2008, 08:31:46 PM »
According to our pitchman, it was our dream to own a "motorcoach."  To this day, DH snickers when he hears the term.

He wanted to own a Greyhound bus???

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LJM

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Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
« Reply #197 on: January 20, 2008, 09:03:23 AM »
The strangest thing is that my hubby should've been much more aware, having lost his distant relative to a religious sect many years ago and being very critical about her gullibility. He fell for the same "meat" served under slightly different dressing. :shock:

I think that whenever someone is in transition and trying to get their sea-legs in a new situation, they are more vulnerable to things that under ordinary circumstances they'd never fall for.

You know that some things are naturally going to be different now, but you don't yet have a handle on HOW, so something that would normally raise a lot of suspicion doesn't raise quite as much. In addition to the positive effects of being determined to make things work, I think it's a state where it's easier to lie to yourself. I know I came dangerously close to falling for some whoppers when I was in transition and struggling to find my feet (both in the form of "employment opportunities" one of which was clearly a scam, the other was at least exceedingly dishonest and a bad deal all around.)

The Amway folks (and assorted other cult groups, scammers, con-artists, and the like) know all this, and so work particularly hard to target people who are in that state.

baglady

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Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
« Reply #198 on: January 21, 2008, 08:25:43 PM »
Aha, I learned something from this thread. My boyfriend lost his job in October and in addition to registering with employment agencies, answering ads wherever he can find them, networking, etc., he's posted his resume on all the help-wanted sites. And he keeps getting calls from people who want to "hire" him to sell insurance. He *hates* the very idea of selling and has nothing on his resume that would indicate he's interested in a sales position of any kind, much less insurance.

I never heard of an MLM that sold insurance, but now I'm guessing it's Primerica people making these calls. Vultures.
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LadyDyani

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Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
« Reply #199 on: January 22, 2008, 07:09:07 AM »
Aye.  I've had four calls from Primerica since my unemployment started, as well.
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scap64

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Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
« Reply #200 on: March 19, 2008, 06:59:18 PM »
The strangest thing is that my hubby should've been much more aware, having lost his distant relative to a religious sect many years ago and being very critical about her gullibility. He fell for the same "meat" served under slightly different dressing. :shock:

I think that whenever someone is in transition and trying to get their sea-legs in a new situation, they are more vulnerable to things that under ordinary circumstances they'd never fall for.

The Amway folks (and assorted other cult groups, scammers, con-artists, and the like) know all this, and so work particularly hard to target people who are in that state.

Precisely.

Shoo

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Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
« Reply #201 on: March 24, 2008, 05:10:45 PM »
I have a close friend who just confided that her MK business has cost her and her family something like $50k in debt.  She's got the car, which she's trying to give back, and it's going to cost her around $9k just to get them to take the stupid car back.  Now she's trying to sell off all the inventory she purchased.  She's offering BOGO's and other good deals to try and recoup some of her money.

She was in it around 1.5 years.  She became a "director" and got the car (the entry level Grand Pris or whatever it is).  She did every single thing they ever told her to do.  She sold, she recruited, she held shows.   She sacrificed time with her family and her home life was wrecked.  Her kids are a mess and her dh was threatening to leave her.

The sad part is that she BELIEVED every thing they told her.  She absolutely believed it.  Never questioned it.  Until the walls came tumbling down on the house of cards she had built.

And that's what an MLM will do to you.


kingsrings

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Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
« Reply #202 on: March 24, 2008, 07:25:21 PM »
Oh dear, I'm afraid I let a MK rep sucker me last week. She was one of the vendors at the membership appreciation day my health club was holding. I was just going around to each one, looking at the stuff. And I love little free samples of beauty products, so that is where she got me. I just can't bring myself to say no sometimes, so she got my personal info, such as name, address, email, and phone number. At least I did say no to the free facial, though. However, I fear I am going to get hounded through the other means of communication now, especially since I gave her permission to send me little free samples of some MK stuff.

Just Lori

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Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
« Reply #203 on: March 24, 2008, 07:27:59 PM »
I was at a jewerly party a few months ago and the topic turned to buying the discontinued jewelry on Ebay.  From there, we discussed other Ebay finds.  I mentioned that I've heard you can get some good deals on Ebay from former Mary Kay consultants who are trying to unload their inventory and recoup their investment.

Wouldn't you know it, there was a Mary Kay consultant at the party.  She quickly pointed out that they don't recommend buying off Ebay, because you should only keep makeup for a year.  Yes, shoe leather left an aftertaste in my mouth that night.   :-[

Midnight Kitty

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Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
« Reply #204 on: March 24, 2008, 07:45:16 PM »
I was at a jewerly party a few months ago and the topic turned to buying the discontinued jewelry on Ebay.  From there, we discussed other Ebay finds.  I mentioned that I've heard you can get some good deals on Ebay from former Mary Kay consultants who are trying to unload their inventory and recoup their investment.

Wouldn't you know it, there was a Mary Kay consultant at the party.  She quickly pointed out that they don't recommend buying off Ebay, because you should only keep makeup for a year.  Yes, shoe leather left an aftertaste in my mouth that night.   :-[

In my experience, people who sell make up tell you that you have to toss it after a year, people who sell motor oil tell you to change it every 3,000 miles, and people who sell shoes tell you to buy new ones every year.  Anyone else detect a common thread here?  Yep, the people who are saying it benefit by having you toss something that was probably perfectly serviceable and buying what they are selling.

Call me cynical, but I'll keep my comfortable shoes until I wear them out, use my make up until it's gone, change my oil every 5,000 miles, and keep my hard earned money in the bank until I really need to spend it.
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Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
« Reply #205 on: March 24, 2008, 07:51:16 PM »
This is the part that gets me.  If all these MLMs are SO great and wonderful and everyone makes a gazillion dollars, why all the secrecy and subterfuge to get people to attend the danged meetings?

Fifteen years ago, an acquaintance from church asked me to look into this "great, new marketing business" he was starting.  I asked him point blank if this his own up start company or if it was like a franchise of something else.  He assured me he was starting the business for himself.  I went with him to a meeting he was having with some of the people involved in "his" business.  Yep.  Amway.  Our group sat for a ninety minute sales presentation.   After it was over, he came over to me and asked me what I thought about it.  I told him I was shocked that he had lied to me about this being HIS business.  He smiled and said that Amway allows him to set up his own business DBA for his marketing,  so it WAS his own business.  He just did business solely with Amway for his distributor.  I told him that if lying and/or telling half truths was the way he did business, then I was not about to trust him or the organization.  He got mad at me for saying that and did not have much to do with me after that night.

About three years later, another friend asked me to look into his "multilevel marketing" company he was operating.  I asked him outright if it was Amway.  He asked me why I asked him that; and when I responded that I was not interested in dealing with Amway after my experience with the first guy, he laughed and said to trust him that what he wanted to show me was nothing like anything I had seen before.  I agreed to go to his house to see this business.  Yep. Amway again - but this time REVAMPED in its recruiting presentation, so it was "nothing like" what I had seen before.  My friend got a kick out of telling me that.  I left rather quickly.
This friend dropped out of Amway after a few money-losing months.  He later told me that Amway trains people not to let on what it is they are recruiting for because Amway has such a bad reputation.  He said that Amway admitted that if most people knew ahead of time the business was Amway, they would stop the sales pitch and walk away, so Amway was coming up with ways to avoid saying its name.  Some of these involved creative "parties" that never mentioned business until the "guests" arrived.  He also said that he was told that lying about the name was OK as it was for the betterment of the person being recruited and the sales person had the other person's "best interests" at heart.  He told me that from what he experienced, Amway EARNED its poor reputation.
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Harriet Jones

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Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
« Reply #206 on: March 24, 2008, 11:31:30 PM »
I was at a jewerly party a few months ago and the topic turned to buying the discontinued jewelry on Ebay.  From there, we discussed other Ebay finds.  I mentioned that I've heard you can get some good deals on Ebay from former Mary Kay consultants who are trying to unload their inventory and recoup their investment.

Wouldn't you know it, there was a Mary Kay consultant at the party.  She quickly pointed out that they don't recommend buying off Ebay, because you should only keep makeup for a year.  Yes, shoe leather left an aftertaste in my mouth that night.   :-[

In my experience, people who sell make up tell you that you have to toss it after a year, people who sell motor oil tell you to change it every 3,000 miles, and people who sell shoes tell you to buy new ones every year.  Anyone else detect a common thread here?  Yep, the people who are saying it benefit by having you toss something that was probably perfectly serviceable and buying what they are selling.

Call me cynical, but I'll keep my comfortable shoes until I wear them out, use my make up until it's gone, change my oil every 5,000 miles, and keep my hard earned money in the bank until I really need to spend it.

And there's also a difference in *used* makeup that's a year old and new-in-package makeup of the same age.

mindibrad

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Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
« Reply #207 on: March 25, 2008, 09:08:35 AM »
I was at a jewerly party a few months ago and the topic turned to buying the discontinued jewelry on Ebay.  From there, we discussed other Ebay finds.  I mentioned that I've heard you can get some good deals on Ebay from former Mary Kay consultants who are trying to unload their inventory and recoup their investment.

Wouldn't you know it, there was a Mary Kay consultant at the party.  She quickly pointed out that they don't recommend buying off Ebay, because you should only keep makeup for a year.  Yes, shoe leather left an aftertaste in my mouth that night.   :-[

MK Corporate and Directors tell their consultants to say that.  The image that they hope to create is one where eBay sellers are wiping their bumm with the makeup right before they list it.

The reality is that many of these sellers are the same as these Directors and Consultants, just a few months/years later.  They are the ones who were told "you can't sell from an empty wagon" and convinced that the only way that they would be successful is with a "full store" of products that are quickly discontinued, revamped and/or repackaged.

The other people selling are MK liquidators, who make their living buying remaining inventories from Consultants looking to cut their losses and don't have the time/energy to eBay it themselves.  And of course, there are the people selling for Directors...the ones who have a unit that is not producing enough for them to maintain their Director status, so they make up the difference on their own credit cards and then try to recoup the money by having a friend sell it for them on eBay.

MK Reps like to say "well, you don't know if the stuff was kept in a hot/freezing car" or whatever "scare tactic conditions" they want to say.  But the truth is, you don't know what conditions under which ANY rep keeps their product.  You just have to trust that the seller (whether an eBay-er or current MK Rep) is providing you with honest and accurate info.

(oh - of course there is the standard disclaimer that if the color/product was discontinued 4 years ago, then you know it is 4 years old.  But if it is a current product in the current packaging, then chances are the item is safe to buy)

Sorry - don't mean to sound ranty - I just know too many people who were bullied/pressured in to spending money on inventory they couldn't afford, then guilted in to keeping it (as opposed to sending it back for the 90% buyback) because their Director (who pressured them to buy it in the first place) would be charged back the commission.  I sold MK for about 6 months, made money (because I never bought in to the "must have a full store" mentality") and got out when I opened my eyes and saw what they were doing to a large portion of the sales force.  I still liked the products - I just refused to have my name associated with a company that silently condoned the horrible tactics of the Directors.

Check out www.pinktruth.com for more information on the deceptive practices of MK and their sales force


ginlyn32

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Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
« Reply #208 on: March 25, 2008, 09:35:45 AM »
POD to the nth degree Mindibrad!

I was an MK consultant for about a year. I never sent back my inventory because I bought the lie that I would never be allowed to sell again. Not that I'd want to.

So my DH and I went into to debt so I could get $1,000 of product that I couldn't sell.

I tried everything, right down to cold calling (which we were told not to do). I'm afraid I even made a few etiquette blunders as well (what can I say? I was young and stupid) and pressured friends and family into having parties.

When I finally decided to quit, I never recieved a call from my director or anyone asking me what the problem was. I liked their product and still continued to use it, even after I quit. I stopped using it years ago when it was easier just to go to Estee Lauder or to the drug store.

I was almost conned into Vector (sold Cutco knives) and Primerica (insurance). The thing that made me mad about the both of these org. is that they farm names off Careerbuilder and Monster looking for people who are desperate for a job. Esp. when they pretend it is a legit. job. I asked at least 3 times at my interview if the job was commission or salary and the lady wouldn't answer me. So I walked out of the interview.

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Just Lori

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Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
« Reply #209 on: March 25, 2008, 11:40:35 AM »
My husband's siblings are currently selling machines that scan your finger and tell you how many antioxydants you need.  They'll then graciously offer to sell you the antioxydants, for a few hundred dollars a month.  I did some research on the company for my FIL, because his kids wanted him to buy into it.  The best analysis I read was from someone who said that if this were an amazing medical breakthrough, the company owners would sell the rights to a biotech firm and go retire to Cancun.  They wouldn't be trolling the internet trying to recruit people who want to work at home in their jammies.