Author Topic: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)  (Read 112781 times)

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Midnight Kitty

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Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
« Reply #240 on: May 06, 2008, 05:10:50 PM »
Within the past few years, once in a while in the mail I will get an invitation to a FREE DINNER! - but I have to sit through a group such-and-such company meeting about retirement options, investments, etc., etc. other business sales pitches. I love free meals more than anybody, but it's not worth going through the hell of someone trying to sucker me into something.
Hence the Robert Heinlein slogan: TANSTAAFL (There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch) >:D
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sadiemae

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Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
« Reply #241 on: June 11, 2008, 10:44:06 AM »
Back when my parents had three young children and were avid campers, they "won" a free weekend vacation at an RV park. We went, enjoyed the weekend, then on Sunday morning my parents went to their "appointment," which was a hard sell to purchase the RV campground version of a timeshare. After over an hour in the room with three kids and many firm refusals to purchase, the representative told them that we had fifteen minutes to pack and leave or we would be charged for the whole weekend and every event we attended. We booked out of there to a scene of other campers breaking down camp in a panic. Seems we weren't the only ones told to buy or leave, NOW...  Anyhow, we got out on time. Many people would have been annoyed and would have vowed never to return. Not my mother- she sensed opprotunity...

See, we were outdoorsy campers who hiked and camped in the wild, and these were RV camps, which are basically a field with trailer after trailer lined up. We would never purchase a space in one place, and especially not a space in a field. However, they always had a pool or a well kept pond and activities for the kids, so it was a nice break away form our normal weekend of hiking and trail blazing.

My mother signed up for every RV timeshare she could find. Since they want to sell, they let you pick the weekend you want to stay. She had us booked for random weekends for a good three years. We went all over portions of the northeast for free, camping on Friday & Saturday night. Mom & Dad would head in for the hard sell and the three kids would pack up camp. They would say no, be told to leave and be driving away minutes later.

Finally, they stopped letting us book weekends. We were fine with that. Of course, I don't think what she did was right, but I will say that it was a creative way to beat the hard sell. My mom really is a salesman's worst nightmare.

Just Lori

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Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
« Reply #242 on: June 11, 2008, 11:01:13 AM »
My husband likes to shop Goodwill.  My daughter shares this love.  They returned from a Goodwill trip the other day and he said, "Look honey, this woman asked me if I wanted a job!"  He showed me her Primerica business card.  He didn't realize it was an MLM organization.

I'm really nervous about anyone who thinks it's good business to offer jobs to strangers, whether they're at a Goodwill store or having dinner in a five-star restaurant.

My Own World

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Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
« Reply #243 on: June 11, 2008, 05:27:56 PM »
Of course, I don't think what she did was right, but I will say that it was a creative way to beat the hard sell. My mom really is a salesman's worst nightmare.
I have no problem with what your parents did.  They agreed to attend a sales pitch in consideration for the Friday and Saturday night stay the business offered them.  I doubt seriously that your parents approached the RV time share to ask to be given a free weekend.  I also doubt that at any time they stated they had ANY intention of buying anything, so they did not go due to a lie.  What did they do that was not "right" in your eyes?

The business asked them to come and hear a sales pitch.  They did that.  Contract fulfilled.
Common sense isn't as common as one might think.

Sophia

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Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
« Reply #244 on: June 11, 2008, 06:47:09 PM »
Of course, I don't think what she did was right, but I will say that it was a creative way to beat the hard sell. My mom really is a salesman's worst nightmare.
I have no problem with what your parents did.  They agreed to attend a sales pitch in consideration for the Friday and Saturday night stay the business offered them.  I doubt seriously that your parents approached the RV time share to ask to be given a free weekend.  I also doubt that at any time they stated they had ANY intention of buying anything, so they did not go due to a lie.  What did they do that was not "right" in your eyes?

The business asked them to come and hear a sales pitch.  They did that.  Contract fulfilled.

I agree.  Plus, It seems to me that the RV park went over the line telling people to leave immediately if they didn't buy. 

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Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
« Reply #245 on: July 02, 2008, 12:29:49 PM »
I have a Rainbow vacuum and it was WELL WORTH the money. My doc even recommends them for his allergy patients. By the way - if you can get your doc to write a note verifying that you need a HEPA filter (or water filter, like a Rainbow) vac because your dust allergies are severe, then you can write the vacuum off as a medical expense. I did.


Until reading this thread, I had no idea that Rainbows were that expensive...or sketchy. My parents were 37 when they got married (first marriage) and had saved up a bit. So I suppose it's less shocking that they'd get such an expensive vacuum.

I can attest to their being very good...I don't know if it was worth the money or not, but it lasted for years and years. Because it's water based, we would use it to suck up termites when we had an infestation. Then they drowned. We'd leave them in there for a while and then dump it into the toilet and flush in case there were survivors. It was quite comforting for dealing with swarmers (my only real childhood memory of that vacuum).

Also really heavy.

One of my friend's wives was recently recruited to sell MonaVie, but she decided to buy it online instead (people getting rid of their products that wouldn't move). I think that's probably the best option for MLM products...if you really want them.

It makes me sad when I see people online who are talking about how they're building their own business, on their way to freedom, etc. Because I know that for most of them it won't work out.

Speaking of Amway and the OP, this site is rather badly designed, but the free ebook about this guy's experience inside Amway is quite illuminating. I read it last year as a part of my fascination with MLM & cults. http://www.merchantsofdeception.com/DOWNLOADBOOK.html


Brentwood

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Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
« Reply #246 on: July 02, 2008, 12:36:18 PM »

Until reading this thread, I had no idea that Rainbows were that expensive... <snip>
I can attest to their being very good...



Cutco knives are also very good - but I object to their marketing practices in much the same way that I object to Rainbow's marketing practices. Both companies use high-pressure tactics, encourage people to trade on their friendships (both suggesting that salespeople tell their friends they "just want to practice their presentation"), and require salespeople to obtain names and phone numbers from the people they present to. A young woman I know who briefly sold Cutco also told me that she was not allowed to receive credit for her sales UNLESS she got 10-15 names and numbers from the buyer.

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Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
« Reply #247 on: July 02, 2008, 12:58:38 PM »
I got sucked into Mary Kay last year......and, no, I do not have time or desire to sell it or recruit.  I have tons of the stuff.....guess what folks are getting for Christmas  >:D

Just Lori

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Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
« Reply #248 on: July 02, 2008, 03:11:18 PM »
My husband's sister was in town last month and wanted to sell us on a new spa treatment that zaps wrinkles from your face.  Now, I'm all about zapping some wrinkles.  But the device is $300 and the assorted lotions are $50, and I just don't have that kind of budget for zapping wrinkles.  I'm more in the L'Oreal wrinkle cream category myself.

I think what I hate most is that these tactics can put you on the spot with people you know and love.  I'd love to support my SIL in this venture. She and my BIL are putting all four kids through college right now.  But I can't buy things I don't want or need.  Besides, I'm a little nervous about a product that basically uses an electronic current to plump up your skin.  I can't see it working well in the long term.

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Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
« Reply #249 on: July 02, 2008, 03:37:33 PM »

Until reading this thread, I had no idea that Rainbows were that expensive... <snip>
I can attest to their being very good...



Cutco knives are also very good - but I object to their marketing practices in much the same way that I object to Rainbow's marketing practices. Both companies use high-pressure tactics, encourage people to trade on their friendships (both suggesting that salespeople tell their friends they "just want to practice their presentation"), and require salespeople to obtain names and phone numbers from the people they present to. A young woman I know who briefly sold Cutco also told me that she was not allowed to receive credit for her sales UNLESS she got 10-15 names and numbers from the buyer.

That's a good point. Even if I had the money, I'd think twice before buying a Rainbow (if they're still available) instead of finding one sold legitimately.

Scritzy

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Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
« Reply #250 on: July 02, 2008, 04:10:04 PM »
Cutco knives are also very good - but I object to their marketing practices in much the same way that I object to Rainbow's marketing practices. Both companies use high-pressure tactics, encourage people to trade on their friendships (both suggesting that salespeople tell their friends they "just want to practice their presentation"), and require salespeople to obtain names and phone numbers from the people they present to. A young woman I know who briefly sold Cutco also told me that she was not allowed to receive credit for her sales UNLESS she got 10-15 names and numbers from the buyer.

Exactly. That's how I got sucked in. And as I said, the girl whined when I wouldn't give her names and phone numbers of my other friends (or worse, co-workers!). She said she wouldn't get credit for the sale. I was so sorry for her. Not.

And I still say the shears I bought are no better than Fiskars. In fact, I like my Fiskars better.
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wolfie

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Re: The Amway \"housewarming\" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
« Reply #251 on: July 02, 2008, 08:52:37 PM »

Until reading this thread, I had no idea that Rainbows were that expensive... <snip>
I can attest to their being very good...



Cutco knives are also very good - but I object to their marketing practices in much the same way that I object to Rainbow\'s marketing practices. Both companies use high-pressure tactics, encourage people to trade on their friendships (both suggesting that salespeople tell their friends they \"just want to practice their presentation\"), and require salespeople to obtain names and phone numbers from the people they present to. A young woman I know who briefly sold Cutco also told me that she was not allowed to receive credit for her sales UNLESS she got 10-15 names and numbers from the buyer.

Either she was lying or her manger was lying to her. I did cutco for one summer - I suck as a salesperson and hardly sold anything or got references. And I got a credit for every sale I did.

Brentwood

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Re: The Amway \"housewarming\" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
« Reply #252 on: July 02, 2008, 10:21:29 PM »


Either she was lying or her manger was lying to her. I did cutco for one summer - I suck as a salesperson and hardly sold anything or got references. And I got a credit for every sale I did.

She had no reason to lie to me.

wolfie

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Re: The Amway \\\"housewarming\\\" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
« Reply #253 on: July 03, 2008, 05:03:48 AM »


Either she was lying or her manger was lying to her. I did cutco for one summer - I suck as a salesperson and hardly sold anything or got references. And I got a credit for every sale I did.

She had no reason to lie to me.

then her manger was lying or they really changed things. Because when i did it they never even asked me how many references I got. They only wanted a signature on a piece of paper saying I did a demonstration. They advertised as being $14 an hour. So if commissions for 40 presentations didn\'t add to up at least that amount they would cut you a check for the difference. So they wanted some proof that you actually did the demonstrations. I did my 40 and never looked back.

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Re: The Amway \\\"housewarming\\\" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
« Reply #254 on: July 03, 2008, 10:38:52 AM »

then her manger was lying or they really changed things. Because when i did it they never even asked me how many references I got. They only wanted a signature on a piece of paper saying I did a demonstration. They advertised as being $14 an hour. So if commissions for 40 presentations didn\'t add to up at least that amount they would cut you a check for the difference. So they wanted some proof that you actually did the demonstrations. I did my 40 and never looked back.

If this was more than two years ago, then it's entirely possible they did change things.