Author Topic: surgery stories - who does this?  (Read 1848 times)

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DianeRN

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Re: surgery stories - who does this?
« Reply #30 on: October 23, 2014, 03:52:22 PM »
Some of the advice that I, and I'm sure others get, for diabetes. If I use 1 tsp of cinnamon each day, I'll never need to take my meds and my sugar will be in control for ever.

I have a SIL who knows everything about healthcare despite barely having finished high school and has no medical background. When my dad was diagnosed with cancer, she advised that he skip the chemo and radiation and "just juice". He opted to follow the doctors' recommendations and stretched is six month prognosis to five and a half years.

Sinus surgery, I've had it twice. Put ice bags on in the recovery room and for as much time as possible afterwards. No bruising, no swelling, never needed anything for pain.

blueyzca01

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Re: surgery stories - who does this?
« Reply #31 on: October 23, 2014, 05:13:15 PM »
I love being able to tell my story to people about to have wisdom teeth pulled:
AM:  Surgery went great, got home, Mom put me to bed.  Around 1 PM:   I will tell them that I woke up in “some” pain, but mom slapped a couple of pain pills in my mouth, put ice packs on my face, and I went back to sleep.  7PM:  ate salmon for dinner. 

Sunday morning:  get up and drive back to LA to my college apartment.  I walked in and my roommates practically fell over, with their exclamations of, “My God, you still have cheekbones!!” 
I like to think it give them some hope.
No one ever says, "Why me?!?!" when something good happens.

amandaelizabeth

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Re: surgery stories - who does this?
« Reply #32 on: October 23, 2014, 05:57:08 PM »
When I was diagnosed with cancer, those pessimistic stories started to get to me, and really upset my mother.  I explained to her that for my type of cancer there was a 82% chance of a cure.  So if she took all those people who died in agony etc and added them up, my chances were greatly enhanced.  This comforted her no end, and she started a 'bingo' game.  Eight years later when I was given the all clear, she was diagnosed with the same cancer.  I asked her about grim stories and she said she already had several stories to add to her total.  Three years down the track and she is still clear.

SamiHami

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Re: surgery stories - who does this?
« Reply #33 on: October 23, 2014, 06:08:41 PM »
We had a teacher and another parent work on our sons to convince them that diabetics lived for 20 years past onset and then would pretty much drop dead.  I am diabetic.  We knew the boys had some anxiety about my diabetes, but really spent time talking with them and providing education about the condition.  We were concerned when their anxiety continued to escalate.  They would start talking to each other and us about "countdowns" as to how much longer I had, and they would keep checking on me to make sure I was still there.  Every day at pick-up they would look horribly worried until they saw me.

They finally told us that the teacher had taken them aside one day and just told them "You know that your Mother is going to die.  She is a diabetic."  The mother of the classmate had lost her husband to complications of diabetes some years before. She told them that I had those 20 years, then poof, because that is what happened to her husband.  >:( I asked classmate's Mom and she confirmed what she had said.  "Your sons deserve to know"

Many years later with lots of work on things have passed, and my sons still have anxiety about it.

How did she go from "deserves to know" all the way to "so that means I must be the one to tell them?" It never occurred to her in, in all her saintly wisdom, to discuss it with you before terrifying your children? I sincerely hope you reported the teacher involved and that she received some very stern discipline--even termination--for her part in all this.

What have you got? Is it food? Is it for me? I want it whatever it is!

goldilocks

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Re: surgery stories - who does this?
« Reply #34 on: October 23, 2014, 08:50:15 PM »
OP here!

Surgery went fine and he is doing great.

This was all more complicated because he has NEVER had surgery before, he's 55.   Not even dental.  So he was ultra-nervous.

I will admit to playing the "childbirth" game - telling stories of how hard my labor was, usually when my friends are all trying to one-up each other.  For some reason we all want to be the one with the worst labor!   I pity any newly pregnant woman that overhears us.

mmswm

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Re: surgery stories - who does this?
« Reply #35 on: October 23, 2014, 08:52:32 PM »
I'm glad things went well. :)

There's a difference between the childbirth game between a bunch of veteran moms and deliberately trying to scare a first timer. Though I never get to play the childbirth game.  My friends disqualified me years ago.  Apparently there's a med school tourist attraction disqualification somewhere in the rules.
Some people lift weights.  I lift measures.  It's a far more esoteric workout. - (Quoted from a personal friend)

Diane AKA Traska

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Re: surgery stories - who does this?
« Reply #36 on: October 23, 2014, 11:59:12 PM »
Good surgery story: 12 years old, had my tonsils removed.  Next morning, checked myself out of the hospital at 6AM (I don't know what they were thinking) and went home and made toast for myself (you know, the flour version of steel wool!)

Mom called the hospital (I am not surprised she called, I *am* surprised she didn't unload on them about letting a young teen check themselves out of the hospital!) and asked the doctor about the toast thing.  Doctor asks "is there any pain?"  Mom responds that I appear to be eating just fine.  Doctor replies "it's a better way to start the day than a sugary cereal."
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