Author Topic: Food Aversions  (Read 7594 times)

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Sibby

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Re: Food Aversions
« Reply #15 on: March 13, 2007, 02:55:51 PM »
I don't want to take this off-topic, but can you tell me what foods they now tell pregnant women to avoid? 

This is what I was told to avoid-
Hot dogs, lunch meat and soft cheeses (listeria)
Raw fish sushi
Peanuts and other tree nuts in the third trimester and if breastfeeding to reduce allergy risks.

Susan



I was also told to avoid not just raw fish sushi, but any cooked fish that might contain a high amount of mercury, such as tuna.  As for cheeses, I was told to avoid all non-pasteurized cheese. 



Exactly any large fish (tuna, shark, etc) has high mercury risk.  Anything normally would be but is unpasturised that isn't (like apple cider).  Raw or very soft eggs.  Nuts.  Things with alcohol (might seem obvious, but people do forget "oh!  It didn't occur to me rum cake would be an issue!")

Gwywnnydd

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Re: Food Aversions
« Reply #16 on: March 13, 2007, 03:33:03 PM »
This has undoubtedly been asked before, but I can't find the relevant posts.  Is it the host's responsibility to ask about a guests food allergies/aversions or does the responsibility lie with the guest to let the host know?  Does it make a difference if the host would reasonably expect to know the preferences of her guests, but those have now changed?

It would be courteous for the host to inquire if their guest has any food restrictions (allergy, religious, etc.). It is equally the guest's responsibility to speak up if their health (or that of an unborn child) could be at risk. Before the event if at all possible, of course.

I am on a very restricted diet, and there are a lot of dishes I just can't eat. If I am asked, I will tell my hosts about this. If I forgot, well, that's my bad. I guess I eat a small meal this time (I can usually find something I can eat). It's not like I'm teetering on the edge of starvation :)

wordgirl

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Re: Food Aversions
« Reply #17 on: March 13, 2007, 09:31:34 PM »
I am on a very restricted diet, and there are a lot of dishes I just can't eat. If I am asked, I will tell my hosts about this. If I forgot, well, that's my bad. I guess I eat a small meal this time (I can usually find something I can eat). It's not like I'm teetering on the edge of starvation :)
That's pretty much how I handle it. My food issues are my problem, not my host's.

If asked, I will briefly outline my allergies (never my aversions) but if if I'm served something I can't eat, I just focus on the good company.

VorFemme

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Re: Food Aversions
« Reply #18 on: March 14, 2007, 01:14:38 AM »
I thought that pregnant women not liking the taste of shrimp was some kind of old wives' tale - until I had a plate of garlic shrimp set in front of my in the first trimester of my first pregnancy.

It was NOT an old wives' tale for me............I would suggest a chicken dish instead of shrimp - since I have found that the meats tend to go well in similar sauces (shrimp curry easily converts to chicken or even turkey curry, chicken in marinara sauce over pasta instead of shrimp, etc.).

Some women crave spicy, some crave sour, and some pregnant women cannont stomach anything but the blandest foods...........so preparing a couple of different things to accompany the main dish is a good idea. 
Let sleeping dragons be.......morning breath......need I say more?

supernova

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Re: Food Aversions
« Reply #19 on: March 14, 2007, 05:49:43 AM »
"Sheree, I'm so glad you and Fred can make it over for dinner next Thursday!  Is there anything you or Fred are allergic to, or just can't eat?  No?  Well, I was thinking about spaghetti, if that's OK?  Great!  See you Thursday!"

"Mary, thank you so much; Tom and I would be delighted to come for dinner on Wednesday.  You remember I'm a vegetarian and Tom can't eat mustard, right?  Oh, you're making fettucine alfredo?  It's my favorite!  Great!  See you Wednesday!"

In other words...  it's both the hostess's responsibility to ask on issuing the invitation; and the guest's to remind the hostess well in advance, especially if the hostess forgets to ask.  It's the belt-and-suspenders theory.   :)

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magdalena

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Re: Food Aversions
« Reply #20 on: March 14, 2007, 06:38:56 AM »
Is it the host's responsibility to ask about a guests food allergies/aversions or does the responsibility lie with the guest to let the host know?  Does it make a difference if the host would reasonably expect to know the preferences of her guests, but those have now changed?

I've just moved and lost and lots of friends have let us know that they'd love to visit ;-) Everytime we plan the visit/dinner/weekend, I make sure to ask if there's anything they do not eat. On the other hand, whenever I'm asked for dinner I try to remind the host gently that I am lactose intolerant and will not eat lots and lots of milk even if I do take the enzyme pills. I don't mind them servind dairy anyhow, I'll just skip some  :)
I really appreciated it when a friend reminded me that her soon to be husband cannot stomach spicy foods. I usually cook very very hot dishes, but will adjust and look for yummy mild things we can all enjoy, or I'd rather know that Babs doesn't like onions than see her suffer at dinner  ;)



Mammavan

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Re: Food Aversions
« Reply #21 on: March 15, 2007, 12:33:02 PM »
Thank you all for all the information on food pregnant women should avoid.  I guess most of them are common sense, but I don't think that I would have thought of them had this post not pointed them out.

Jaywalker

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Re: Food Aversions
« Reply #22 on: March 15, 2007, 02:12:14 PM »
rum cake really isn't an issue -- the amount of alcohol is not enough
to matter

in fact an occasional drink after the first trimester especially really isn't an issue although many women avoid it entirely and that is fine too 

we find that people usually say something like 'Is there anything you don't eat?' when issuing dinner invitations -- which invites people to chime in with allergies and aversions -- as well as vegetarian status.  And with vegetarians you really have to get specific as it can range from Vegan (hard to adapt to) to people who only avoid red meat

WestAussieGirl

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Re: Food Aversions
« Reply #23 on: March 18, 2007, 12:29:49 AM »
I don't want to take this off-topic, but can you tell me what foods they now tell pregnant women to avoid?  It's been quite a few years since I was pregnant and, while I might have paid for it with excruciating heartburn later, there were no foods that I was told to avoid.  I would like to ensure that I don't serve my pg guests foods they cannot eat but assume people would know about.

I haven't been too well for the last few days so I haven't been able to log in, sorry.  I think this has been pretty well covered by others by now but, for the record, I don't eat any kind of cold meats or seafood (or anything that might have touched cold meat or seafood e.g. the salad on the same platter), anything with mayonnaise, pate, soft cheeses, raw or undercooked eggs, shellfish that are filter feeders (e.g. oysters, mussels).  I don't eat large fish (because of the mercury) as a rule, but if it were served to me I would (since it is quantity of that that is the problem).  Basically the foods that are high risk for food poisoning.

IndianInlaw

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Re: Food Aversions
« Reply #24 on: March 18, 2007, 09:22:57 AM »
In the picky, picky world of etiquette, one should eat what one can among the dishes that are served.

If the hostess asks everyone their preferences (or what is allowable), what would she serve?

Not that I'm not sympathetic to your plight, that's just what Miss Manners says.

Mikayla

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Re: Food Aversions
« Reply #25 on: March 18, 2007, 11:31:15 AM »
In the picky, picky world of etiquette, one should eat what one can among the dishes that are served.

If the hostess asks everyone their preferences (or what is allowable), what would she serve?

Not that I'm not sympathetic to your plight, that's just what Miss Manners says.

That's exactly how I see it.  Of course, there are shades of gray.  If it's 2 couples getting together and you don't know the hostess well, that might be a bit different.  But for a larger gathering, I personally (vegetarian) just go with the flow and eat what I can.  If asked, of course I tell the person I'm a veggie, but it would horrify me if I ever thought someone changed a menu on my behalf. 

freakyfemme

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Re: Food Aversions
« Reply #26 on: March 19, 2007, 01:46:08 AM »
In the picky, picky world of etiquette, one should eat what one can among the dishes that are served.

If the hostess asks everyone their preferences (or what is allowable), what would she serve?

Not that I'm not sympathetic to your plight, that's just what Miss Manners says.

Except, supposing the hostess has gone to a TREMENDOUS amount of work, making baked ham, steak, chicken, pork-fried rice, and vegetables cooked in lard?  Would I be rude if I just didn't touch ANYTHING?  Or, would it be ruder to mention in advance that I'm a vegetarian even if I wasn't asked? 

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Re: Food Aversions
« Reply #27 on: March 19, 2007, 09:47:39 AM »
In the picky, picky world of etiquette, one should eat what one can among the dishes that are served.

If the hostess asks everyone their preferences (or what is allowable), what would she serve?

Not that I'm not sympathetic to your plight, that's just what Miss Manners says.

Except, supposing the hostess has gone to a TREMENDOUS amount of work, making baked ham, steak, chicken, pork-fried rice, and vegetables cooked in lard?  Would I be rude if I just didn't touch ANYTHING?  Or, would it be ruder to mention in advance that I'm a vegetarian even if I wasn't asked? 

If I were the hostess, I would be horrified to discover I had invited you to a meal where you couldn't eat a single thing (or only a couple of side dishes). I'd prefer that you remind me you're a vegetarian.
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Lisbeth

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Re: Food Aversions
« Reply #28 on: March 19, 2007, 11:50:13 AM »
In the picky, picky world of etiquette, one should eat what one can among the dishes that are served.

If the hostess asks everyone their preferences (or what is allowable), what would she serve?

Not that I'm not sympathetic to your plight, that's just what Miss Manners says.

Except, supposing the hostess has gone to a TREMENDOUS amount of work, making baked ham, steak, chicken, pork-fried rice, and vegetables cooked in lard?  Would I be rude if I just didn't touch ANYTHING?  Or, would it be ruder to mention in advance that I'm a vegetarian even if I wasn't asked? 

If I were the hostess, I would be horrified to discover I had invited you to a meal where you couldn't eat a single thing (or only a couple of side dishes). I'd prefer that you remind me you're a vegetarian.

If you were the hostess, and every guest reminded you that they're vegan/eat only free-range/are on Atkins/are allergic/are diabetic/are celiac/are kosher, etc., etc., are you going to prepare a separate dish for each and every one?
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Venus193

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Re: Food Aversions
« Reply #29 on: March 19, 2007, 12:57:09 PM »
If you were the hostess, and every guest reminded you that they're vegan/eat only free-range/are on Atkins/are allergic/are diabetic/are celiac/are kosher, etc., etc., are you going to prepare a separate dish for each and every one?

If my guest list included all those people I wouldn't try for a sit-down dinner.  I would do a buffet with everything very carefully arranged.