Hostesses With The Mostest > Entertaining and Hospitality

Wording the no host "invitation"

(1/4) > >>

Chocolate Cake:
I'm coordinating a no host event at a local restaurant.  I want to make sure that all invitees understand that, if they choose to attend, they will pay for their own expenses (i.e. dinner/beverage). 

I thought I'd put on the invitation/notice something to this effect:

This is a "no host" occasion.   For your consideration and budget planning, please see the attached menu.  If you have any questions, please let me know.


What do you think?

sparksals:
Would everyone in your circle understand what "no host occasion" means?  Do your outtings typically involve going Dutch?  What type of event is it? Bachelorette party?  Retirement party?  Birthday celebration for family?

I think your example sounds a bit formal and cold. 

jais:

--- Quote from: sparksals on March 20, 2007, 04:58:36 PM ---I think your example sounds a bit formal and cold. 

--- End quote ---

I believe this is just a PORTION of the invitation, not the invitation in it's entirety. 
However, I do agree that until this site, I wouldn't no what a "no host occasion" meant.  Though I really can't think of a better way to word it......

Chocolate Cake:
It is for a dinner in honor of a soon-to-be Mommy (for the fourth time).   Because of the circumstances, it isn't a shower.  I have no idea if most of the group would know what "no host" means.  

I think your example sounds a bit formal and cold.  

Any alternative wording suggestions would be greatly appreciated!

I believe this is just a PORTION of the invitation, not the invitation in it's entirety. 

Correct.  The statement about "no host" would follow all the what/when/where information. 

jais:
I'm sorry dear, I'm stumped as to how to word it so that everyone understands.  I just didn't think it sounded cold and formal when part of something else.  I'll see if I can solicit suggestions from coworkers.  :)

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

Go to full version